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PAL JOEY ON BROADWAY OPENS TO RAVE REVIEWS

Last night (December 18), Rodger’s and Hart’s “Pal Joey” opened at Roundabout Theatre Company’s Studio 54 and the early reviews are raves.  Links to the full reviews follow first paragraphs.  For more information about “Pal Joey” go to: www.roundabouttheatre.org

 

Associated Press

Bloomberg News

Variety

WOR Radio

 

Nearly 70 years after an unrepentant cad named Joey Evans first graced a Broadway stage in “Pal Joey,” he’s back, with his ambition and charm intact.  The musical, featuring a vintage Richard Rodgers-Lorenz Hart score, has been revived several times on Broadway over the decades, but none of the productions has been as thoroughly a refurbishing as the small yet effective redo that the Roundabout Theatre Company opened Thursday at Studio 54.  Playwright Richard Greenberg, author of “Take Me Out” and “Three Days of Rain,” has given John O’Hara’s original book (based on O’Hara’s New Yorker short stories) a new sheen without changing the general outline of the story: punkish song-and-dance man scores big, gets his comeuppance but soldiers on.  Greenberg’s rewrite is crisp and to the point. There is a hard-boiled briskness to his work, a film-noir sensibility in its punchy dialogue that ricochets lickety-split across the stage.

Associated Press, Michael Kuchwara

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081219/ap_en_re/theater_review_pal_joey_1

 

 

”Pal Joey,” snazzily revived by the Roundabout Theatre Company, pumps much-needed fresh blood into a Broadway grown anemic.  A spate of pre-opening drama — when the gifted understudy, Matthew Risch, was promoted to protagonist — appears to have done no harm. Stockard Channing and Martha Plimpton supply additional star power and Richard Greenberg contributes a sleek new book to the top-notch Rodgers and Hart score.  Based on John O’Hara’s raffish stories and book, this is a rare, truly grown-up musical, having enough great songs, spectacle, adult and adulterous plot to satisfy all but the kiddies, for whom there are other shows aplenty.

Bloomberg News, John Simon

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601098&sid=a2hUKFjBMzdo&refer=movie

 

The Rodgers and Hart songs in “Pal Joey” are certainly easy on the ear, but what makes the Roundabout revival of their 1940 show so compelling is Richard Greenberg’s trenchant adaptation of the original book by John O’Hara. Erasing the sanitizing stamp of musical-theater coyness, Greenberg brings a fascinating melancholy grubbiness to this cynical story of sordid emotional transactions and opportunistic behavior in late-1930s Chicago. It’s a dark show for desperate times, with enough dramatic meat on its bones to work even as a nonmusical play. And like “Cabaret” a few years back, it seems right at home in the decadent former playpen of Studio 54.

Variety, David Rooney

http://www.variety.com/index.asp?layout=print_review&reviewid=VE1117939247&categoryid=33

 

You gotta go see Pal Joey at Studio 54.  You’ll come out singing the songs and dancing in the streets.  How often do we do that with musicals today?  So, enjoy.

WOR Radio, Joan Hamburg

http://broadwaybroadcast.wordpress.com/2008/12/18/pal-joey-on-the-joan-hamburg-show/

 

 

www.roundabouttheatre.org

PAL JOEY’S MATTHEW RISCH IN THE NEWS

ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY

 

Pal Joey

 

Star

Matthew Risch

 

In the News

 

Pal Joey opens tonight on Broadway at Studio 54

 

Matthew Risch, currently starring as “Joey Evans” in Roundabout Theatre Company’s PAL JOEY, is in the news.

 

Click the links below to learn more about Matthew’s role in this classic Rodgers and Hart musical:

 

Playbill.com:

Brief Encounter

 

Broadway.com:

Fresh Face

Opening Night video

 

NPR’s “Morning Edition”:

Pal Joey on NPR

 

Roundabout Theatre Company (Todd Haimes, Artistic Director) presents Stockard Channing (Vera Simpson), Matthew Risch (Joey Evans) and Martha Plimpton (Gladys Bumps) in this new Broadway production. PAL JOEY features a new book by Tony® Award winner Richard Greenberg , based on the original book by John O’Hara, with music direction by Tony® Award winner Paul Gemignani, choreography by Graciela Daniele and directed by two-time Tony® Award winner Joe Mantello at Studio 54 on Broadway.

 

PAL JOEY opens officially tonight on Broadway at Studio 54 (254 West 54th Street).  This is a limited engagement through February 15th, 2009.

 

Set in Chicago in the late 1930s, PAL JOEY is the story of Joey Evans, a brash, scheming song and dance man with dreams of owning his own nightclub.   Joey abandons his wholesome girlfriend Linda English, to charm a rich, married older woman, Vera Simpson, in the hope that she’ll set him up in business. 

 

The Rodgers & Hart score for PAL JOEY includes such classic songs as “Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered,” “I Could Write a Book,” “You Mustn’t Kick It Around,” and “Zip,” among others.   The new production of PAL JOEY will also feature “I’m Talking to My Pal,” a song that had been dropped from the score during its out-of-town tryout.

           

TICKET INFORMATION & PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE:

Tickets are available by phone at (212) 719-1300, online at www.roundabouttheatre.org or at the Studio 54 Box Office (254 West 54th Street).  Tickets on Tuesdays, Wednesdays & Thursdays range from $36.50 to $121.50.  Tickets on Fridays, Saturdays & Sundays range from $36.50 to $126.50. 

 

Pal Joey plays Tuesday through Saturday evenings at 8:00PM with a Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday matinee at 2:00PM.

 

www.roundabouttheatre.org

 

#          #          # 

PAL JOEY STAR STOCKARD CHANNING IN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Roundabout Theatre Company’s PAL JOEY opens on Broadway tonight, Thursday, December 18 at Studio 54.

 

ASSOCIATED PRESS

December 18, 2008

 

Stockard Channing, back singing on Broadway, is ‘wild again, beguiled again’

By Mark Kennedy

 

 

NEW YORK (AP) – If you want Stockard Channing eating out of your hand – and who doesn’t? – just compliment her pipes.

The 64-year-old Tony and Emmy winner is singing on Broadway for the first time since 1984 and would appreciate a little encouragement.

Channing has four songs in the update of the Richard Rogers-Lorenz Hart musical “Pal Joey,” including the stunning “Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered.”

“It’s great to sing again,” she says before a recent preview performance. “You know how you sing in the shower or you sing in your head? The issue is to get the stuff that’s in your head out of your mouth.”

To get in the mood to sing “Bewitched” – with its lyrics “I’m wild again, beguiled again/A simpering, whimpering child again” – Channing listened to a CD of the greats who covered it, including Frank Sinatra and Mel Torme.

“I had a tradition to be part of: I wasn’t just going to talk the song,” she says. “If anyone says that they love the way I do ‘Bewitched,’ I’m theirs forever. I’ll be honest with you. If you really want to get into my heart, that’s all you have to say.”

Set in Chicago in the late 1930s, “Pal Joey” tells the story of a venal song-and-dance man who is romancing two women: a wholesome girl, and a wealthy, married older woman, Vera Simpson, played by Channing.

“She is the original cougar,” Channing says, with a smile.

Of the sexy show, she says, “It’s more Billy Wilder than Walt Disney. I wouldn’t bring your 10-year-old.” Then she thinks better of it: “Oh, who knows? Maybe. Why not? Ten-year-olds these days.”

The current production has had a rocky start, with the original Joey – Christian Hoff – leaving about a week into previews after sustaining a foot injury while on stage.

“We were all stunned,” says Channing, who credits Hoff’s understudy, Matthew Risch, for valiantly stepping into the role. “It really has been extraordinary. But there’s no business like show business.”

Channing knows all about that: She’s been a fixture on stage, TV and film since making her debut as an undergrad in a Harvard University production of “The Threepenny Opera.”

She first hit Broadway in 1971 in “Two Gentlemen of Verona” and her early film credits include the 1978 movie version of “Grease,” in which she played bad girl Rizzo.

She won the 1985 Tony for her role in “A Day in the Life of Joe Egg,” and went on to act in “Six Degrees of Separation” on stage and in the film version, which earned her an Oscar nomination. She has most recently been recognized for her role as first lady on the former NBC series “The West Wing.”

Along the way, she’s tried to avoid what she calls “pinata parts” – those roles for older actresses that call for grotesque monsters, such as drunken mothers-in-law.

“Your job is to come out there and have people with sticks beat you,” she says, ruefully. “For women of a certain age, unfortunately, that’s a pinata part to me.”

Her latest role is definitely not like that, and Channing is visibly pumped to exercise both her pipes and live theater muscles.

“It’s really exciting to remember what this thing is like, having this big plane lift off the ground and just go,” she says. “It’s really thrilling.”

 

To read the entire story, click here:

http://www.newsday.com/entertainment/news/wire/sns-ap-theater-stockard-channing,0,4729411.story

 

 

 

PAL JOEY’S STOCKARD CHANNING FEATURED IN W MAGAZINE

 

ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY

 

PAL JOEY

Star  

 STOCKARD CHANNING

 

FEATURED IN THE CURRENT ISSUE OF

W MAGAZINE

 

On stands now!

 

Stockard Channing, star of the Roundabout Theatre Company’s Broadway production of Pal Joey, is featured in the “Eye” section of W Magazine (December Issue). Stockard Channing talks to W writer Diane Solway about her role in this highly anticipated revival that has not been seen on Broadway in over 30 years. An original portrait of Channing is included. The magazine is on stands now. 

 

Opening night is Thursday, December 18th

On Broadway at Studio 54

 

Roundabout Theatre Company (Todd Haimes, Artistic Director), in association with Marc Platt, presents Stockard Channing (Vera Simpson), Matthew Risch (Joey Evans) and Martha Plimpton (Gladys Bumps) in a new Broadway production of Pal Joey with Robert Clohessy (Mike), Jenny Fellner (Linda English), Daniel Marcus (Ludlow Lowell), Steven Skybell  (Ernest), Timothy J. Alex, Brian Barry, Kurt Froman, Bahiyah Sayyed Gaines, Lisa Gajda,         

Anthony Holds, Nadine Isenegger, Mark Morettini, Kathryn Mowat Murphy, Abbey O’Brien, Hayley Podschun, Krista Saab and Eric Sciotto

 

PAL JOEY features a new book by Tony® Award winner Richard Greenberg , based on the original book by John O’Hara, with musical direction by Tony® Award winner Paul Gemignani, choreography by Graciela Daniele and directed by two-time Tony® Award winner Joe Mantello at Studio 54 on Broadway.

 

PAL JOEY opens officially on Thursday, December 18th, 2008 at Studio 54 on Broadway (254 West 54th Street).  This will be a limited engagement through February 15th, 2009.

 

Set in Chicago in the late 1930s, PAL JOEY is the story of Joey Evans, a brash, scheming song and dance man with dreams of owning his own nightclub.   Joey abandons his wholesome girlfriend Linda English, to charm a rich, married older woman, Vera Simpson, in the hope that she’ll set him up in business. 

 

TICKET INFORMATION & PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE:

Tickets are available by phone at (212) 719-1300, online at www.roundabouttheatre.org or at the Studio 54 Box Office (254 West 54th Street).  Tickets on Tuesdays, Wednesdays & Thursdays range from $36.50 to $121.50.  Tickets on Fridays, Saturdays & Sundays range from $36.50 to $126.50. 

 

Pal Joey will play Tuesday through Saturday evenings at 8:00PM with a Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday matinee at 2:00PM.

 

www.roundabouttheatre.org

###  

 

PAL JOEY STAR STOCKARD CHANNING IN NY TIMES

NEW YORK TIMES, Arts & Leisure

December 7, 2008

 

Bewitched, Bothered and Back

By ERIK PIEPENBURG

 

To experience the audio slideshow click here:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2008/12/07/theater/20081207-stockard-channing/index.html#

 

 

HOW you know the name Stockard Channing may depend on how you’re entertained. She was the naughty bun-in-the-oven Rizzo, with Olivia Newton-John and John Travolta, in the 1978 movie adaptation of “Grease.” Theater fans remember her as Ouisa Kittredge in John Guare’s play “Six Degrees of Separation” in 1990 (she reprised the role in the 1993 film adaptation, which also starred Will Smith and Donald Sutherland). And for several seasons she was Abbey Bartlet, the wife of the president on the NBC series “The West Wing.”

“It’s interesting to be known as an errant teenager or the first lady of the United States, depending who you’re talking to,” Ms. Channing said.

 

Last seen on Broadway in the 1999 revival of “The Lion in Winter” opposite Laurence Fishburne, Ms. Channing, 64, is returning as Vera Simpson in the Roundabout Theater Company’s production of the Rodgers and Hart musical “Pal Joey” at Studio 54. The show, with a new book by the playwright Richard Greenberg, is directed by Joe Mantello, with musical direction by Paul Gemignani.

The title of Vera’s big number, “Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered,” is an apt description of the backstage dramatics that unfolded shortly after previews started. Christian Hoff, 40, who was to play Joey Evans, withdrew from the show after a foot injury and was replaced permanently by his understudy, Matthew Risch, 27. The show’s opening was pushed back a week, to Dec. 18.

Before a recent preview performance Erik Piepenburg sat down with Ms. Channing to discuss the challenges of a sudden cast change, her light-bulb moment with Brecht and Weill, and letting go of “Grease.” Excerpts from the interview follow.

 

Losing a Co-Star

It’s been hard on the company, any time you lose a member of the company so suddenly who’s been such an organic part of the creative process. … You can see how demanding the show is physically. I obviously wasn’t present for these conversations, but everybody had to make a quick decision. I think from his part, to bow out – he could injure himself permanently if he came back too soon. The temptation in any kind of athletic situation, I think, is “I don’t want to let the team down,” which is very much Christian’s way. … It was terribly dramatic because we had to cancel the Saturday matinee. …We’re blessed, and we also have a great loss at the same time, which is really stressful. I’m sure it was a very painful decision for him to make.

 

Old Joey, New Joey

I think we’re telling a slightly different story. There’s a much larger gap in age, which concerns me sometimes, that Vera Simpson is not going to be arrested for robbing the cradle. On the other hand there’s a great tradition that goes back to Colette, of an older woman and a younger man. It’s been going on for a long time.

 

Vocal Chops

I said I’m not going to do this unless I go to Paul Gemignani, who is brilliant and candid. I went to talk to him and he said: “Yeah, you can do it. I’m not here to make you look bad.” Mr. Bluster. And I said, well, I’ll bow to that. I went back to my roots, which is also ironically musical roots. When I first started acting in college we did rock musicals, “Trojan Women” as a musical, all that kind of stuff we did back in those days when we were brave.

 

Acting in the ’60s

I was still an undergraduate at Harvard, but I was married. and my husband was in the business school. That was the life I was supposed to be leading. A friend of mine had come up to me at the Hasty Pudding Club and said, “I want you to audition for Jenny in ‘Threepenny Opera.’ ” I said, “Why not?” I sang for him, and that was it. This was kind of a legendary production, as it turns out, at Harvard those days. I’ll never forget it. …

 

There was a bunch of us at Harvard around that time: Tommy Lee Jones, Jimmy Woods, John Lithgow and various other people. There was a synchronicity of a lot of young talent and energy. Singing that song, telling the story of that song, I went home and could not sleep. I knew a thunderbolt had happened in my life. It was very inconvenient.

 

A Theatrical Childhood

My parents would go to musicals a lot. You’d come home, and they would put records on at cocktail time. I know the complete score of “Happy Hunting,” “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes,” “South Pacific.” … I remember seeing my now good friend Elaine Stritch in “Goldilocks.” I was home from school – it was my birthday or something – and my father took me to see her. It didn’t last very long. It was a very obscure musical. It was a very long time ago. I can see it like it was yesterday. I know every word of the score.

 

To read the full story, click here:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/07/theater/07Piep.html?_r=1&ref=theater

PALL JOEY STARS CHANNING AND PLIMPTON IN NY MAGAZINE

NEW YORK MAGAZINE

December 8, 2008

 

Conversation: The Pals of ‘Pal Joey’

By Jesse Oxfeld

 

The emphasis is on the female leads in this revival of the Rodgers and Hart classic. Never mind that neither has sung onstage in 25 years.

 

In the past few seasons, Martha Plimpton has played a female pope, a Shakespearean princess, and some Russian revolutionaries; Stockard Channing played First Lady Abbey Bartlet on The West Wing and, oddly, narrates Meerkat Manor. Now they’re both belting Rodgers and Hart classics like “Bewitched, Bothered, and Bewildered” in the Roundabout revival of Pal Joey, which, with a new book by Richard Greenberg, makes its debut on December 18. (Opening night has been delayed a week, after the planned Joey, onetime Jersey Boy Christian Hoff, hurt his foot and left the production.) The two women spoke to Jesse Oxfeld.

This production is so much darker than the classic Frank Sinatra-Rita Hayworth-Kim Novak movie, which has a happy ending.
Channing: The movie was very sanitized. The play, the original play, was funky. The play was about, you know, a married woman and a young guy. In the movie, Rita Hayworth was a widow. And, a little bit conveniently, an ex-stripper.
Plimpton:So she could do [the striptease song] “Zip.”

Which Martha’s character, Gladys-who’s barely a presence in the movie-now sings. Had you read the original John O’Hara stories the play is based on?
Channing: I’d read other stuff by John O’Hara, so I knew the tone. And then Joe Mantello, our director, gave me a copy of the original play, and it’s very close in tone to this-but it’s very choppy in the second act.

So Greenberg’s work was fixing the story.
Channing: Yes. But the language is very fair-the rhythms and the bleakness of it are very, very close to the original O’Hara.

Neither of you is known as a musical star …
Plimpton: It’s my first singing role as an adult. When I was a child, I did downtown musicals with the Public, and then I didn’t do another musical for 25 years, until now. This is my first [Puts on affected British accent] big Broadway show!
Channing: [To Plimpton] You told me you were doing a cabaret thing.
Plimpton: I don’t call it cabaret.
Channing: I’m outing her act!
Plimpton: I have done, you know, evenings of song. I have some friends … I did a show with Lucy Wainwright Roche and Dan Lipton at the Zipper in August. But I haven’t ever done it, you know, for money.

Stockard, have you had a major singing role since Grease?
Channing: Well, yeah, I actually replaced Liza Minnelli in The Rink.

And were you trying to get back to it?
They definitely came to me. I thought it was the stupidest idea I’d ever heard-it seemed so far-fetched. I thought, don’t you want Christine Ebersole or Bernadette Peters? [Laughs] And they didn’t; they wanted me. I tried to take that as a compliment.

Well, Vera’s an urbane, arch, sexy woman of a certain age. You see her and think, that’s clearly a Stockard Channing role.
And then she opens her mouth and sings! [Laughs]

So you were nervous about that.
I was very much aware of the responsibility of singing these songs. I mean, “Bewitched,” for God’s sakes.
Plimpton: We were both terrified. Channing: We were sitting next to each other at the first reading going, “I can’t believe we’re doing this!”
Plimpton: I think I took a beta-blocker that morning.

Pal Joey
Roundabout Theater Company at Studio 54.
Opens December 18.

To read the entire story, please click here:  http://nymag.com/arts/theater/features/52580/

 

 

 

 

 

PAL JOEY STAR IN THE NEW YORK TIMES

Roundabout Theatre Company’s production of Pal Joey is playing at Studio 54 on Broadway.

 

 

NEW YORK TIMES

November 21, 2008

 

A Jersey Boy’s Moment as Broadway’s New Pal

By PATRICK HEALY

 

It’s not every day that an actor is tapped to play a role immortalized by Gene Kelly onstage and Frank Sinatra on screen. It is not every day, either, that producers choose to revisit that role, Joey Evans in “Pal Joey,” given that it has a title character who uses and exploits women and has a legendarily uneven book that goes with the famous Rodgers and Hart score.

 

Given how risk-averse Broadway is, such a role might seem reserved for a bankable, household-name star who guarantees the extraordinary charisma that the rakish, antihero Joey must project – a Harry Connick Jr., say, or a Hugh Jackman, both rumored as potential Joeys in recent years.

 

So the weight of history and high expectations now sits on the shoulders of one Christian Hoff. He is not a household name; he is not a bankable star. What he is – besides the lead in Roundabout Theater Company’s revival of “Pal Joey,” now in previews at Studio 54 – is a Broadway classic himself: a determined, confident actor who found midcareer fame (and a featured-performance Tony) as Tommy DeVito in “Jersey Boys” and has his first shot at a major leading role.

 

For Mr. Hoff the role is one he said he was born to play after years as guys “you would not want your daughter to date.”

“The success I’m having right now is the result of 32 years of hard work and perseverance and my share of struggle to get to this point to go to the next step and lead one of our of great American musicals,” Mr. Hoff said in an interview on Monday in the quiet New Jersey suburb of Milburn, where he lives with his wife, Melissa, and their young daughter.

 

“And the most challenging part of this is realizing that everything I need to do to succeed in this role is there,” he said. “I just need to exercise it. Everything I am, I’ve got to pull out: my dark side, humor, charm, my song-and-dance man, my go-getter, my cutthroat Machiavellian side. But it’s on me to make it happen.”

 

Mr. Hoff said he was not intimidated by the expectations for the show, which is having its first Broadway revival in more than 30 years, or by comparisons to Kelly or Sinatra, who performed in a film version that was significantly different from the stage musical. During an hour and a half of conversation he exuded a mix of certainty and humility about his success, speaking evenly and forcefully. At one point during the interview, his lawyer called to talk about Mr. Huff’s custody battle with his first wife over his two other children; he took note of the lawyer’s number and continued talking, not thrown off a smidge by his offstage family drama.

 

“Rather than follow in the footsteps of the great icons who have played the role of Joey Evans – Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra, Bob Fosse – as an actor I’m enjoying filling the shoes of Joey Evans as a character and taking it to that level,” Mr. Hoff, 40, said.

 

“Having that history gives me a real sense of responsibility,” he added. “But I don’t feel the weight of history. Some would, but there’s so much more to this story and its impact on the audience. I’m relishing in that and not any expectation or preconception. We are defining what this show is, not redefining.”

 

Based on several New Yorker short stories by John O’Hara about a rakish, scheming song-and-dance man, the musical is known far better for its songs – gold-plate standards like “Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered,” “I Could Write a Book” and “Zip” – than for ever being seen by audiences. Mr. Hoff himself was only vaguely familiar with its story and history when he was approached about the part, amid the runaway commercial success of “Jersey Boys.”

 

“I had no idea what it was about, no idea of all of the songs that were in it, no idea of who was in it, and no idea what an underdog it was,” Mr. Hoff said.

 

He said he instantly connected with Joey, in no small part because he was the sort of lovably roguish character that Mr. Hoff has long played, like Tommy DeVito, the real-life Four Seasons singer who struggled with gambling debts and inner demons. On television he has appeared on “Law & Order: Criminal Intent” and as a roguish district attorney on “Ugly Betty.” For decades he has played supporting characters who have dark or troubled sides, though he also became known for playing a lighter role, as the voice of the cartoon character Richie Rich.

 

As he prepared to play Joey, Mr. Hoff grew excited that he could define a role for audiences who might be drawn to a flawed central character more than they were in Kelly’s day, for the premiere in 1940. Reviews then were mixed to negative.

 

“People are willing to accept a musical about an ambitious antihero and those who enable him to succeed – and who ultimately pull the rug from under him,” Mr. Hoff said.

 

“People are ready to see and identify with a character who is less than perfect,” he continued. “We all have something in common with Joey Evans. We all want to please people, we all fancy ourselves as altruistic, and yet it is inevitable that we are self-serving ultimately. The only question is, where along the line do you learn the difference between ambition and abuse of power?”

 

The artistic director of Roundabout, Todd Haimes, began mulling a revival of “Pal Joey” 11 years ago, after reading a new book for the musical by the playwright Richard Greenberg (“Take Me Out,” “Three Days of Rain”). In an interview this week Mr. Haimes said he thought the Greenberg adaptation transformed the original “flawed book” by enriching the dialogue and sharpening the characters of not only Joey but the women in his life, like the damaged society wife Vera Simpson (Stockard Channing) and the wronged chanteuse Gladys Bumps (Martha Plimpton). In other words, there would be a stronger story that might match the well-known songs.

 

“When it was written in 1938, and I’m speculating here, you couldn’t go to as dark a place as you can go now,” Mr. Haimes said. “It’s certainly not something that’s done in high schools.” But the rights to the show remained in the hands of commercial producers for a long nine years. There were fits and starts over that time: a 1998 reading with Mr. Connick, talk of a production directed by Robert Altman. Eventually Roundabout acquired the rights, and Mr. Haimes enlisted one of his favorite directors, Joe Mantello, who decided early that he wanted Mr. Hoff – based largely on his work in “Jersey Boys”- and Ms. Channing.

 

To read the entire story, clike here:  http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/21/theater/21hoff.html?_r=1&ref=theater 

ROUNDABOUT’S PAL JOEY BEGINS PREVIEWS TONIGHT

ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY

 

Previews begin tonight!

 

STOCKARD CHANNING     CHRISTIAN HOFF

MARTHA PLIMPTON

star in a new Broadway production of

PAL JOEY

 

with

Robert Clohessy, Jenny Fellner, Daniel Marcus, Steven Skybell

Timothy J. Alex, Brian Barry, Bahiyah Sayyed Gaines, Lisa Gajda,

Anthony Holds, Nadine Isenegger, Mark Morettini, Kathryn Mowat Murphy,

Abbey O’Brien, Hayley Podschun, Matthew Risch, Krista Saab, Eric Sciotto

 

Music by RICHARD RODGERS       Lyrics by LORENZ HART

New Book by RICHARD GREENBERG

Based on the original book by JOHN O’HARA

 

Music Direction by PAUL GEMIGNANI

Choreography by GRACIELA DANIELE

Directed by JOE MANTELLO

 

Official Opening Thursday, December 11th, 2008

on Broadway at Studio 54

 

Roundabout Theatre Company’s (Todd Haimes, Artistic Director) Pal Joey will begin previews tonight, Friday, November 14th at 8:00PM. Pal Joey stars Stockard Channing (Vera Simpson), Christian Hoff (Joey Evans) and Martha Plimpton (Gladys Bumps) with Robert Clohessy (Mike), Jenny Fellner (Linda English), Daniel Marcus (Ludlow Lowell), Steven Skybell  (Ernest), Timothy J. Alex, Brian Barry, Bahiyah Sayyed Gaines, Lisa Gajda, Anthony Holds, Nadine Isenegger, Mark Morettini, Kathryn Mowat Murphy, Abbey O’Brien, Hayley Podschun, Matthew Risch, Krista Saab and Eric Sciotto

 

PAL JOEY features a new book by Tony® Award winner Richard Greenberg , based on the original book by John O’Hara, with music direction by Tony® Award winner Paul Gemignani, choreography by Graciela Daniele, directed by two-time Tony® Award winner Joe Mantello at Studio 54 on Broadway.

 

PAL JOEY opens officially on Thursday, December 11th, 2008 at Studio 54 on Broadway (254 West 54th Street).  This will be a limited engagement through February 15th, 2009.

 

The design team includes two-time Tony® Award winner Scott Pask (Sets), five-time Tony® Award winner William Ivey Long (Costumes), Tony® Award nominee Paul Gallo (Lights), Tony Meola (Sound), Don Sebesky (Orchestrator), Eric Stern (Dance Arranger) and Paul Huntley (Hair and Wig Design)..

             

Set in Chicago in the late 1930s, PAL JOEY is the story of Joey Evans, a brash, scheming song and dance man with dreams of owning his own nightclub.   Joey abandons his wholesome girlfriend Linda English, to charm a rich, married older woman, Vera Simpson, in the hope that she’ll set him up in business. 

 

TICKET INFORMATION & PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE:

Tickets are available by phone at (212) 719-1300, online at www.roundabouttheatre.org or at the Studio 54 Box Office (254 West 54th Street).  Ticket prices range from $36.50 to $121.50. 

 

Pal Joey will play Tuesday through Saturday evenings at 8:00PM with a Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday matinee at 2:00PM.

 

Through ACCESS Roundabout, 100 tickets will be available for the first preview performance (November 14th) for only $10 each. 

 

www.roundabouttheatre.org

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PAL JOEY FEATURED IN VOGUE MAGAZINE

ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY

 

PAL JOEY

Star CHRISTIAN HOFF

 

FEATURED IN THE CURRENT ISSUE OF

VOGUE MAGAZINE

 

On stands now!

 

Christian Hoff, star of the Roundabout Theatre Company’s Broadway production of Pal Joey, is featured in the “People Are Talking About” section of Vogue Magazine (November Issue). Christian Hoff talks to Vogue writer Adam Green about this highly anticipated revival that has not been seen on Broadway in more than 30 years. An original photograph of Hoff is included. The magazine is on stands now. 

 

Pal Joey begins previews on Friday, November 14th 

Opening night is Thursday, December 11th

 

Roundabout Theatre Company (Todd Haimes, Artistic Director), in association with Marc Platt, presents Stockard Channing (Vera Simpson), Christian Hoff (Joey Evans) and Martha Plimpton (Gladys Bumps) in a new Broadway production of Pal Joey  with Robert Clohessy (Mike), Jenny Fellner (Linda English), Daniel Marcus (Ludlow Lowell), Steven Skybell  (Ernest), Timothy J. Alex, Brian Barry, Bahiyah Sayyed Gaines, Lisa Gajda, Anthony Holds,

Nadine Isenegger, Mark Morettini, Kathryn Mowat Murphy, Abbey O’Brien, Hayley Podschun, Matthew Risch, Krista Saab and Eric Sciotto.  

 

PAL JOEY will feature a new book by Tony® Award winner Richard Greenberg , based on the original book by John O’Hara, with music direction by Tony® Award winner Paul Gemignani, choreography by Graciela Daniele and directed by two-time Tony® Award winner Joe Mantello at Studio 54 on Broadway.

 

PAL JOEY will begin previews on Friday, November 14th, 2008 and opens officially on Thursday, December 11th, 2008 at Studio 54 on Broadway (254 West 54th Street).  This will be a limited engagement through February 15th, 2009.

 

The design team includes two-time Tony® Award winner Scott Pask (Sets), five-time Tony® Award winner William Ivey Long (Costumes), Tony® Award nominee Paul Gallo (Lights), Tony Meola (Sound), Don Sebesky (Orchestrator), Eric Stern (Dance Arranger) and Paul Huntley (Hair and Wig Design).

Set in Chicago in the late 1930s, PAL JOEY is the story of Joey Evans, a brash, scheming song and dance man with dreams of owning his own nightclub.   Joey abandons his wholesome girlfriend Linda English, to charm a rich, married older woman, Vera Simpson, in the hope that she’ll set him up in business. 

 

TICKET INFORMATION & PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE:

Tickets are available by phone at (212) 719-1300, online at www.roundabouttheatre.org or at the Studio 54 Box Office (254 West 54th Street).  Ticket prices range from $36.50 to $121.50. 

 

Pal Joey will play Tuesday through Saturday evenings at 8:00PM with a Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday matinee at 2:00PM.

 

Through ACCESS Roundabout, 100 tickets will be available for the first preview performance (November 14th) for only $10 each. 

 

www.roundabouttheatre.org

###  

 

PAL JOEY’S STOCKARD CHANNING FEATURED IN THE JOURNAL NEWS

The Journal News

September 28, 2008

 

http://www.lohud.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080928/ENTERTAINMENT/809280307/1164

 

Stockard Channing returns to Broadway

 

Peter D. Kramer

 

Stockard Channing has been in stage musicals and movies. She knows the difference.

 

But she’s concerned that people who come to see her latest musical – the first Broadway revival of Rodgers & Hart’s musical “Pal Joey” in 32 years, at the Roundabout’s Studio 54 theater this fall – will be coming to see the 1957 movie that starred Frank Sinatra, Kim Novak and Rita Hayworth.

 

“It’s so different,” says Channing. “I watched it a couple of weeks ago and I thought ‘My goodness! People are going to expect a whole other thing, a whole other story.'”

 

The musical, which first opened on Christmas Day 1940 and ran for 374 performances, was based on John O’Hara’s stories about a rakish 1930s Chicago nightclub singer, Joey Evans, who claimed to be everyone’s pal. He meets a woman of means who agrees to keep him in a style to which he could easily become accustomed.

 

The original production starred Gene Kelly as Joey and Vivienne Segal as Vera Simpson. At Studio 54, it’ll be Christian Hoff (“Jersey Boys”) and Channing.

 

The 1957 movie was a Sinatra vehicle set in San Francisco, but it was less dark than its original material.

 

“Frank Sinatra is fabulous, as are the women, but they gotta have that so-called ‘happy ending,'” says Channing. “Rita is a widow, there’s no adultery and some intimations of some sex, but not with Kim. It was the mid-’50s.”

 

The Roundabout revival isn’t the movie, but it also isn’t the original play. Richard Greenberg (“Take Me Out”) has written a new adaptation of the story.

 

“Vera is still Vera,” Channing says. “She’s a woman of considerable means.”

 

There’s little to like about this cougar or the man she keeps.

 

“Joey’s the antihero,” Channing says. “I can’t imagine what it was like when it first hit the stage. That’s what made it groundbreaking, and the whole loucheness, low-life aspect of it was embraced more than people were used to. Not to mention a married woman keeping this guy as a paramour in a musical, no less.”

 

Vera sings five songs, not the least of which is “Bewitched, Bothered, Bewildered,” a Rodgers & Hart classic.

 

People who only know Channing from her eight-year run as first lady Abbey Bartlet in “The West Wing” may not know that she made her Broadway debut in a musical version of “Two Gentlemen of Verona” in 1971.

 

“I was in the chorus and an understudy and I ended up taking over one of the leads in New York and on the road. That’s what brought me to Los Angeles and really started everything rolling,” she says.

 Click here to read the full feature:

http://www.lohud.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080928/ENTERTAINMENT/809280307/1164