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WAITING FOR GODOT concludes limited engagement 7/12

Final Week!

ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY

 

Nathan Lane, Bill Irwin, John Goodman, John Glover

(in order of speaking)

in

Waiting for Godot

By Samuel Beckett

Directed by Anthony Page

concludes its limited engagement Sunday, July 12th, 2009

“This ‘Waiting for Godot’ is a smart, engaging production and deeply satisfying. Mr. Page and his cast generate brisk comic liveliness throughout the show with tasty variety of style and pacing enforced by the grace of fine actors. ”

 – Ben Brantley, New York Times

“Roundabout Theatre Company’s revival is beautifully simple — and very, very funny.”

– Terry Teachout, Wall Street Journal 

On Broadway at Studio 54

Roundabout Theatre Company’s (Todd Haimes, Artistic Director) limited engagement of Waiting for Godot will play its final performance on Sunday, July 12that 2:00 PM. This revival of Samuel Beckett’s classic play stars (in order of speaking) Nathan Lane (Estragon), Bill Irwin (Vladimir), John Goodman (Pozzo) and John Glover (Lucky), directed by Anthony Page.  

Waiting for Godot will have played 31 preview performances and 85 regular performances.  Previews began on April 3rd, 2009 and opened officially on April 30th, 2009 at Studio 54 on Broadway (254 West 54th St). 

The cast also includes Cameron Clifford (A Boy) and Matthew Schechter (A Boy).  The design team includes Santo Loquasto (Sets), Jane Greenwood (Costumes), Peter Kaczorowski (Lights) and Dan Moses Schreier (Sound).

Waiting for Godot remains Samuel Beckett’s most magical and beautiful allegory.  The story revolves around two seemingly homeless men waiting for someone – or something – named Godot.  Vladimir (Bill Irwin) and Estragon (Nathan Lane) wait near a tree on a barren stretch of road, inhabiting a drama spun from their own consciousness.  The result is a comical wordplay of poetry, dreamscapes and nonsense, which has been interpreted as a somber summation of mankind’s inexhaustible search for meaning. 

TICKET INFORMATION:

Tickets are available by calling Roundabout Ticket Services at (212)719-1300, online at www.roundabouttheatre.org or at the Studio 54 theatre box office (254 West 54th Street).

PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE:

Waiting for Godot plays Tuesday through Saturday evening at 8:00 p.m. with Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m. 

WAITING FOR GODOT’S GLOVER IN THE NEW YORK TIMES

Tony nominee, John Glover is currently starring in WAITING FOR GODOT at Roundabout’s Studio 54 on Broadway.
 

The New York Times

May 15, 2009

 

Sunday Styles

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/17/fashion/17night.html?ref=todayspaper

 

A Night Out With | John Glover

Act 1, Purl 2  

By SANDY KEENAN

 

JOHN GLOVER, who is known for the twisted villains he portrays, fingered the buttery fibers of bamboo, cashmere, cotton and silk that filled the bins at the Point Knitting Cafe in Greenwich Village. He settled on an eco-friendly bark-hued wool from Peru and a softer but pricier black cotton from Argentina.

 

“Isn’t this a good green?” he asked, holding up another skein.

 

He knits only scarves, luxuriously long and wide.

 

Virtually unrecognizable from his role as Lionel Luthor in “Smallville,” Mr. Glover, 64, was dressed in dark yoga-style clothing. His signature shock of brown hair was gone, shaved daily for his role in the Roundabout Theater Company’s new production of “Waiting for Godot,” for which he has just been nominated for a Tony Award.

 

This learning a craft upon a craft began in the 1960s, during his first Equity job at Stage West in Springfield, Mass. He couldn’t stand the monotony of theater life, so the wardrobe director taught him to knit.

 

“Once I started this knitting, this making, this creating, I stopped being so angry,” Mr. Glover said over a double espresso. “It was kind of a meditation. That’s why I only do scarves: it keeps it very simple. I can keep my mind fresh, and stay where I am mentally.”

 

“Godot” is different from other plays in that it doesn’t allow him time for knitting at work. In the physically demanding role as Lucky, a slave, Mr. Glover is constantly on stage but mute save for one long nonsensical monologue. Dark greasepaint dirtying his hands and body is another obstacle.

 

As he built a résumé of Broadway, television and film roles, his knitting skills waned. Then the actress Annette O’Toole, a colleague on the WB series “Smallville,” assigned the show’s “knitting women” to complete squares for an afghan to be auctioned for Mr. Glover’s dearest cause, the Alzheimer’s Association. When one woman failed to complete her squares, he stepped in. The project rekindled his love of knitting.

 

Click here to read the full article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/17/fashion/17night.html?ref=todayspaper  

ROUNDABOUT’S WAITING FOR GODOT EXTENDS TO JULY 12

ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY 

Announces a one-week extension!

 

Nathan Lane, Bill Irwin, John Goodman, John Glover

(in order of speaking)

Star in a new Broadway production of

WAITING FOR GODOT

By Samuel Beckett

Directed by Anthony Page

 

Now through Sunday, July 12th, 2009.

On Broadway at Studio 54

 

“This ‘Waiting for Godot’ is a smart, engaging production and deeply satisfying. Mr. Page and his cast generate brisk comic liveliness throughout the show with tasty variety of style and pacing enforced by the grace of fine actors. ” – Ben Brantley, New York Times

 

“Roundabout Theatre Company’s revival is beautifully simple — and very, very funny.”

– Terry Teachout, Wall Street Journal

 

 

Roundabout Theatre Company (Todd Haimes, Artistic Director) is pleased to announce a one-week extension of Waiting for Godot through Sunday, July 12th, 2009.

 

Nathan Lane (Estragon), Bill Irwin (Vladimir), John Goodman (Pozzo) & John Glover (Lucky) star (in order of speaking) in a new Broadway production of Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett, directed by Tony® award winner Anthony Page.

 

Waiting for Godot opened officially on April 30th, 2009 at Studio 54 on Broadway (254 West 54th Street) and the limited engagement has been extended through July 12th, 2009.

 

The cast also includes Cameron Clifford (A Boy) and Matthew Schechter (A Boy).  The design team includes Santo Loquasto (Sets), Jane Greenwood (Costumes), Peter Kaczorowski (Lights) and Dan Moses Schreier (Sound).

 

Waiting for Godot remains Samuel Beckett’s most magical and beautiful allegory.  The story revolves around two seemingly homeless men waiting for someone – or something – named Godot.  Vladimir (Bill Irwin) and Estragon (Nathan Lane) wait near a tree on a barren stretch of road, inhabiting a drama spun from their own consciousness.  The result is a comical wordplay of poetry, dreamscapes and nonsense, which has been interpreted as a somber summation of mankind’s inexhaustible search for meaning. 

 

A cornerstone of twentieth century theatre, Waiting for Godot was Samuel Beckett’s first professionally produced play.  It premiered in Paris in 1953 and premiered on Broadway in 1956 at the John Golden Theatre.   Beckett’s language pioneered an expressionistic minimalism that captured the existentialism of post-World War II Europe.

 

Waiting for Godot has been nominated for two Drama Desk Awards including: Outstanding Revival of a Play & Outstanding Actor in a Play (Bill Irwin); five Outer Critic’s Circle Awards including: Outstanding Revival of a Play, Outstanding Actor in a Play (Bill Irwin & Nathan Lane), Outstanding Director of a Play (Anthony Page) and Outstanding Set Design (Santo Loquasto); two Drama League Awards: Distinguished Performance (Bill Irwin & John Glover).

 

 

TICKET INFORMATION:

Tickets are available by calling Roundabout Ticket Services at (212)719-1300, online at www.roundabouttheatre.org or at the Studio 54 theatre box office (254 West 54th Street).  Ticket prices range from $36.50 to $121.50.

 

PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE:

Waiting for Godot plays Tuesday through Saturday evening at 8:00 p.m. with Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m. 

 

 

ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY is one of the country’s leading not-for-profit theatres.  The company contributes invaluably to New York’s cultural life by staging the highest quality revivals of classic plays and musicals as well as new plays by established writers. Roundabout consistently partners great artists with great works to bring a fresh and exciting interpretation that makes each production relevant and important to today’s audiences.

 

  1. Together these three distinctive venues serve to enhance the work on each of its stages.

 

 

 

Roundabout Theatre Company’s 2008-2009 season includes Lisa Loomer’s Distracted featuring Cynthia Nixon, directed by Mark Brokaw; Christopher Hampton’s The Philanthropist, starring Matthew Broderick, directed by David Grindley.  Roundabout’s sold out production of The 39 Steps made its second Broadway transfer to the Helen Hayes Theatre on January 21, 2009.

 

Roundabout Theatre Company’s 2009-2010 season includes Mark Saltzman, Irving Berlin & Scott Joplin’s Tin Pan Alley Rag, directed by Stafford Arima; Patrick Marber’s After Miss Julie, starring Sienna Miller, directed by Mark Brokaw; Michael Stewart, Lee Adams and Charles Strouse’s Bye Bye Birdie, starring John Stamos, Gina Gershon and Bill Irwin, directed and choreographed by Robert Longbottom; Carrie Fisher’s Wishful Drinking, directed by Tony Taccone; Noël Coward’s Present Laughter starring Victor Garber, directed by Nicholas Martin.

 

www.roundabouttheatre.org

 

# # #

HIGHLIGHTS OF A STAR-FILLED 08-09 BROADWAY SEASON

2008-2009 Broadway Season Officially Ends

 

HIGHLIGHTS OF AN HISTORIC STAR-FILLED YEAR,

PACKED WITH PLAYS,  INCLUDES: 

 

The Seagull • A Man For All Seasons •  To Be Or Not To Be • All My Sons • White Christmas 

 Shrek •  Pal Joey •  Soul of Shaolin•  The American Plan  • Hedda Gabler •  33 Variations 

God Of Carnage •  Impressionism •  Exit The King • Mary Stuart •  The Norman Conquests 

The Philanthropist • Accent on Youth •  Waiting for Godot 

 

as well as the stars:

Joan Allen •  Matthew Broderick •  Stockard Channing    Jeff Daniels   Hope Davis

Jane Fonda    Sutton Foster   James Gandolfini •  John Glover •  John Goodman

Colin Hanks   Marcia Gay Harden • Katie Holmes   Jeremy Irons  •  Bill Irwin

Brian d’Arcy James   Nathan Lane •   Frank Langella John Lithgow   Samantha Mathis

Jan Maxwell   Janet McTeer •  Mary Loiuse Parker    David Hyde Pierce

Lily Rabe  David Rasche   Matthew Risch     Mercedes Ruehl    Geoffrey Rush

Susan Sarandon •  Peter Sarsgaard   Christopher Sieber  Kristin Scott Thomas

Harriet Walter • Steven Weber •  Dianne Wiest   Patrick Wilson

 

Visit the link below for a 2.5 minute glance back at the stars and shows this season

www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZ1ZH2TZNT8

 

 

Here are some highlights from the season. 

 

This was one of the busiest, starriest and eclectic Broadway seasons in years, featuring productions and performances that will make it one to remember.   Starting in October with The Seagull starring Kristin Scott Thomas and Peter Sarsgaard, through last night’s Roundabout Theatre Company revival of Waiting for Godot starring Nathan Lane, Bill Irwin, John Goodman and John Glover, 43 productions have opened on Broadway, including 10 new musicals, nine new plays, four musical revivals, 16 play revivals and five “special events.” 

 

Fall kicked off with the Royal Court’s acclaimed production of Chekhov’s The Seagull directed Ian Rickson, examining the romantic entanglements and regrets of a group of artists gathered on a Russian estate. 

 

Roundabout Theatre Company began autumn exploring politics, religion and power with Frank Langella in A Man for All Seasons directed by Doug Hughes, and wrapped up 2008 with Stockard Channing , Martha Plimpton  and Matthew Risch in Pal Joey, directed by Joe Mantello.  Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler starring Mary Louise Parker rang in the new year at Roundabout, in an adaptation by Christopher Shinn.

 

 

Arthur Miller’s All My Sons, asked audiences to reexamine the costs of war when it returned to Broadway this fall, directed by Simon McBurney and starring John Lithgow, Patrick Wilson, Dianne Wiest and Katie Holmes. 

 

Snow fell early on Broadway when Irving Berlin’s White Christmas, a new stage adaptation of the classic film, opened in November starring Stephen Bogardus, Kerry O’Malley, Jeffry Denman and Meredith Patterson, featuring direction by Tony Award winner Walter Bobbie and choreography by Randy Skinner.

 

The Great White Way saw green in December when Shrek The Musical landed at the Broadway Theatre starring Brian d’Arcy James as the loveable ogre and Sutton Foster as Princess Fiona. Also starring Daniel Breaker, Christopher Sieber and John Tartaglia, the new musical is directed by Jason Moore and written by David Lindsay Abaire (book & lyrics) and Jeanine Tesori (musical) with choreography by Josh Prince.   Flying monks were spotted a few blocks south when Soul of Shaolin played a limited run at the Minskoff.

 

Manhattan Theatre Club opened their season with To Be Or Not to Be, directed by Casey Nicholaw and began the new year in the Catskill Mountains of the 1960s with Richard Greenberg’s The American Plan starring Mercedes Ruehl and Lily Rabe.  They wrapped up their season with Samuel Raphaelson’s on-and-off stage love story, Accent on Youth starring David Hyde Pierce and directed by Daniel Sullivan.

 

This spring, Jane Fonda returned to Broadway after 46 years to confront an obsession with Beethoven and to settle with her on stage daughter played by Samantha Mathis in Moisés Kaufman’s 33 Variations, alongside Colin Hanks and Zach Grenier.  Jeff Daniels, Hope Davis, James Gandolfini and Marcia Gay Harden tried to make nice (and failed) in Yasmina Reza’s comedy God of Carnage directed by Matthew Warchus.  Jeremy Irons and Joan Allen returned to Broadway after long absences to star in Michael Jacobs’ examination of art and love in Impressionism, directed by Tony Award-winner Jack O’Brien.

 

Fictitious monarchs Geoffrey Rush, Susan Sarandon, and Lauren Ambrose – and unappreciated servant Andrea Martin – added their regal presence to the Rialto in Eugene Ionesco’s Exit the King under the direction of Broadway newcomer Neil Armfield.  Historic British royalty was welcomed when Harriet Walter and Janet McTeer took to the stage in the Donmar Warehouse production of Mary Stuart, directed by Phyllida Lloyd.  And The Norman Conquests, Alan Ayckbourn’s trilogy, showcased a somewhat more middle class group of Brits, helmed by the busy Matthew Warchus.

 

Christopher Hampton’s The Philanthropist , directed by David Grindley and starring Matthew Broderick and Steven Weber, looked at the empty, insular lives of college intellectuals.  Appropriately closing the season is Samuel Beckett’s historic Waiting for Godot starring Nathan Lane, Bill Irwin, John Goodman and John Glover, and directed by Anthony Page.  It tells of two seemingly homeless men waiting for someone or something to explain life’s meaning – which, of course, never shows up.  Vladimir and Estragon might be relieved to know that as of yesterday, this year’s season has arrived at its end.

 

Please visit the link below for a 2.5 minute long glance back at the stars and shows this season  www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZ1ZH2TZNT8

 

 

#  #  #  # 

 

ROUNDABOUT’S WIATING FOR GODOT IN THE NEW YORK TIMES

NEW YORK TIMES

May 1, 2009

 

THEATER REVIEW | ‘WAITING FOR GODOT’

Tramps for Eternity

By BEN BRANTLEY

 

Read a Q&A with director Anthony Page on NYTimes.com here:  NYTimeswithAnthonyPage

 

Half a century after he first appeared on Broadway, which is also how long it’s been since he last appeared on Broadway, the old tramp still can’t deliver a simple song. Heck, Vladimir can’t even get the tune right as he wanders through the graveyard ditty that begins the second act of Samuel Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot,” which opened on Thursday night at Studio 54.

 

Yet by the time he’s finished struggling through his number — and moods that dance between defeat and defiance — Vladimir the hobo (played by Bill Irwin) is more inspirational than a dozen Susan Boyles belting beat-the-odds renditions of dream-dreaming anthems.

Ms. Boyle’s closely watched performance in a British talent contest may capture show-biz fantasies of the ordinary transfigured. Vladimir’s clumsy musical stylings follow how ordinary life really plays out. His making it through his song, step by faltering step, is like anybody making it through a single day. And the next day, and the next day, and all the next days to come. If he isn’t some sort of hero, then none of us are.

 

That’s entertainment? A grotty, half-senescent guy wrestling a song to a draw? When “Waiting for Godot” first arrived in New York 53 years ago, critics and theatergoers were divided on that question. (It ran for 59 performances, with a revival the following year that lasted less than a week.)

 

But in 2009, Anthony Page’s smart, engaging production for the Roundabout Theater Company makes it clear that this greatest of 20th-century plays is also entertainment of a high order. It seems fitting that “Godot” — which also stars Nathan Lane, John Glover and John Goodman — returns to Broadway in an interpretation that emphasizes the irresistible rhythms achieved by Beckett’s radical literary surgery, that of cutting basic theatrical diversions off at the knees.

 

Listen, for example, to Estragon (Mr. Lane), Vladimir’s vagabond companion of many decades, starting to tell a joke about an Englishman in a brothel and then forgetting all about after it the first line.

 

Or the lordly, arrogant Pozzo (Mr. Goodman, in a bravura Broadway debut), his booming authority fading as he finishes a lush pastoral description and says: “I weakened a little toward the end. Did you notice?” Or the cadaverous Lucky (Mr. Glover), Pozzo’s ill-used slave, trying to dance on collapsing legs.

 

At first glance, Vladimir and Estragon (or Didi and Gogo), side by side, resemble Judy Garland and Fred Astaire, slumming it in Irving Berlin’s larky hobo duet, “A Couple of Swells.” Look closer, though: these tramps’ faces are encrusted with what look like syphilitic chancres and fresh cuts, as well as stage dirt.

 

All the classic music-hall routines have been crippled and in the process acquire their own compelling grace and energy. “Waiting for Godot” may well be the ultimate statement in world drama on existential futility in the wake of the atom bomb and all that. But it’s also a brilliant piece of craftsmanship, which exactly matches its form to its content, while holding a mirror to its audience.

As Kenneth Tynan wrote of Beckett’s tramps after the infamous London premiere of “Godot” in 1955: “Were we not in the theater, we should, like them, be clowning and quarreling, aimlessly bickering and aimlessly making up — all, as one of them says, ‘to give the impression that we exist.’ ”

 

The high-concept reframing of this play over the years, the versions that have set it in assorted slums and postnuclear wastelands, have overdressed a work that needs no accessories. Mr. Page is a strong, naturalistic director who works from within the text rather than layering over it. (His previous Broadway productions include the excellent revivals of “A Doll’s House” in 1997 and “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” in 2005.)

 

To read the entire review, click here: 

http://theater2.nytimes.com/2009/05/01/theater/reviews/01godo.html?ref=arts 

GODOT’S BILL IRWIN IN THE STAR LEDGER

  Roundabout Theatre Company’s WAITING FOR GODOT is playing at Studio 54 on Broadway  

Star-Ledger

April 26, 2009

http://www.nj.com/entertainment/arts/index.ssf/2009/04/bill_irwin_relishing_the_role.html

Bill Irwin relishing the role he’s been waiting for

by Linda Fowler

NEW YORK — Bill Irwin seems to have a hand in everything and his hands on everything.

Within minutes in his dressing room at Studio 54, the restless actor has deftly picked up and put down an array of items, using them to illustrate whatever’s on his mind and leaving a visitor to wonder whether it would be fun to watch him clean an attic. He conducts a tour of his “suite”; demonstrates a hand-held shower attachment he’s rigged to a wall-mounted sink; reads the cards he received that week for his 59th birthday (here’s one from Mom and Dad in California!) and strums a ukulele he uses as a stress-buster.

When he eventually sits down to talk about his role as Vladimir in Samuel Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot,” he straddles the chair backward.

Dubbed the “Clown Prince” on PBS, Irwin is a performer whose magic touch for mixing it up has led to film (most recently as the tender father of the bride in “Rachel Getting Married”), television (“Sesame Street’s” Mr. Noodle) and live performances of his own creation (“The Regard of Flight” and “Mr. Fox: A Rumination”). His career training took place in sawdust-filled rings, under tents and on streets rather than in a high-minded arts conservatory.

A honed sense of comic timing and an agility with pratfalls and props serve him well in Anthony Page’s Broadway staging of Beckett’s allegory, which features another New York theater wiseguy, Nathan Lane, as Estragon. The revival by Roundabout Theatre Company opens Thursday.

Seriously, folks, “Waiting for Godot” has its laughs — but the 1950 work concerns man’s endless search for hope and self-affirmation in a meaningless world. It’s rife with circus imagery and references, such as Estragon and Vladimir’s hobo rags and bowler hats, and the “ringmaster” character of Pozzo. One scene, in which Lane and Irwin repeatedly and nimbly switch identical bowlers, is taken straight from vaudeville.

“It’s the strangest play and it’s been judged a classic. But it’s still got an outre reputation,” Irwin says. “It’s more Benjamin Britten than it is ‘Tosca.'”

“It’s mystical even to us. But there are great conceits in it, like Nathan’s character is obsessed with his feet and me with the hat. It’s just a great gag. If you were doing circus or vaudeville, you’d come up with that.” (He jokes that the bowler-swap usually goes on “until Nathan decides it’s over.”)

Irwin returns to Broadway toting a 2005 Tony Award for his turn as George in Edward Albee’s “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” but says he’s been “flogging this idea” of reviving “Godot” for years. He’s had the itch to play Vladimir since at least 1988, when he took the part of Lucky opposite Steve Martin and Robin Williams in a Lincoln Center production of “Godot” directed by Mike Nichols. Since much of Irwin’s stage work up to that time was silent, Lucky’s only speech — a 500-word, nonsensical monologue — was the equivalent of “Garbo talks!” to theater cognoscenti.

“I’ve been talking the last few years about the play being seen on a Broadway scale,” says Irwin, picking up one of his half-dozen dog-eared “Godot” paperbacks. “You don’t need to protect this play; it will be around a long time, but it’s usually seen in a small venue.”

“Waiting for Godot” invites any number of interpretations, most often concerning its religious, political and Freudian overtones. “I think any three theater people could look at it and see three different plays,” he says.

But Beckett wasn’t about to enlighten him, even face-to-face. The actor recalls nervously waiting to meet Beckett in a cheap hotel lounge in Paris. The author, nearing the end of his years, lived across the street but was extremely private; Irwin, starstruck, was soon to begin rehearsals as Lucky and was seeking guidance.

“He, true to form, did not really want to talk about the play,” Irwin says. “So I was incredibly shy and he was a shy man and I was petrified. I looked mainly at his hands; we avoided too much direct eye contact and we ended up talking about Northern Ireland and politics and ‘sport,’ as they call it.

 

Click here to read the full article: http://www.nj.com/entertainment/arts/index.ssf/2009/04/bill_irwin_relishing_the_role.html   

WAITING FOR GODOT’S LANE AND IRWIN IN NY MAGAZINE

Roundabout Theatre Company’s WAITING FOR GODOT is playing at Studio 54 on Broadway

 

New York Magazine

April 27, 2009

http://nymag.com/arts/theater/features/56149/  

Laughter in the Dark

Bill Irwin and Nathan Lane on their long wait to play Godot

By Boris Kachka

 

Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot is notorious for its split personality-a howl in the wilderness and a buddy comedy, owing as much to Buster Keaton as to the notion that every man is alone in the universe. So while the West End currently features a knight (Ian McKellen) and an O.B.E. (Patrick Stewart) in the roles of the homeless tramps, Broadway went the other way, with two infamous clowns: Bill Irwin, veteran of the Pickle Family Circus (as well as a recent Tony-winning turn in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?), plays Vladimir; Nathan Lane, Tony-winning star of The Producers, among other musical comedies, plays Estragon. (The production also features John Goodman and John Glover.) Godot‘s U.S. premiere in Miami Beach in 1956 failed miserably after being billed “The Laugh Sensation of Two Continents,” but times change, and this production fully embraces the comedy within the tragedy. Lane and Irwin do know their way around some silly banter, and yet they are dead serious about a play they’ve long revered.

 

[To Irwin] Is it true you have a trampoline in your dressing room?
BILL IRWIN: That doesn’t really describe it. It’s more a little pad that allows you to jog in place.
NATHAN LANE: I thought we were going to hear about bedroom antics. You still have the trampoline and the mirror over the bed?
BI: We have some old photographs of that.
NL: Yes, I saw them on YouTube.

 

The production is in the old Studio 54. Did either of you go dancing here?
NL: I went once. It was a birthday party for Eddie Murphy. All I remember is that it was very dark, and I didn’t feel comfortable, and at one point I walked into a table and knocked over a bottle of Champagne, and this very large man stood up, and it was like a scene from a silent film. I said, “Oh, I’m sorry,” and he said, “You’ll be paying for that.” And so it wound up costing me a couple of hundred bucks.
BI: It confirms me in my decision not to have ever gone.

 

So which of you first wanted to make Waiting for Godot happen?
BI: After doing Virginia Woolf, I made a pest of myself going around saying, “What about Waiting for Godot? And people would tend to nod, but it was a hard thing to bring it to fruition. When it became a conversation with [Roundabout artistic director] Todd Haimes, Todd lit up. He said, “The Roundabout has never done a Beckett play of any kind.”
NL: The moment they said Bill was involved, I said yes, absolutely. A long time ago, we had discussed doing this play.

Together?
NL: No, we were urging each other to do it with other people. Yes, we wanted to do it together!

 

I’ve read that you put up a scene from Godot in high school.
NL: Well, for some reason I felt compelled to do it in the high-school cafeteria. Another student and I did a scene from Godot and a scene from Inherit the Wind.
BI: Dig those choices!
NL: We did the “All the dead souls” section, and they were very quiet. No screams of “You suck” from the back.

 

Were they eating at the time?
NL: No, it wasn’t dinner theater. As a kid, I loved Godot because of the poetry and the humor and the strangeness, but then as you get older, it’s much more resonant. It’s not so absurdist. I realize that these are the conversations I have every day. “What do we do now?” “Let’s go, yes.” “Did that all happen yesterday?”
BI: Actors tend to be haunted by this play in one direction or the other. Either they have no desire ever to have anything to do with it, or it’s on your list of things that drive you.
NL: Yeah, the number of people who tell you “I hate that play,” or they threaten you with “I might come, because of you, but I don’t know.” Elaine Stritch said to me, “Oh, Nathan, if that play isn’t funny, it’s one long fucking night in the theater.”

 

Click here to read the full article and view the original portrait: http://nymag.com/arts/theater/features/56149/    

2008-2009 DRAMA LEAGUE AWARD NOMINATIONS

2008-2009 DRAMA LEAGUE AWARD NOMINATIONS

 

Nominations for the 75th annual Drama League Awards, celebrating excellence in Broadway and Off-Broadway theatre, were announced this morning.

 

 

33 VARIATIONS has been nominated for Distinguished Production of a Play (Moisés Kaufman) and Distinguished Performance Award (Jane Fonda).

 

 

ACCENT ON YOUTH has been nominated for a Distinguished Performance Award (David Hyde Pierce).

 

 

ALL MY SONS has been nominated for a Distinguished Performance Award (Patrick Wilson), as well as an honor for previous Distinguished Performance Award winner John Lithgow.

 

 

THE CRIPPLE OF INISHMAAN has been nominated Distinguished Revival of a Play (Garry Hynes) and Distinguished Performance Award (David Pearse).

 

 

DISTRACTED has been nominated for Distinguished Performance Award (Cynthia Nixon).

 

 

EXIT THE KING has been nominated for Distinguished Revival of a Play and two Distinguished Performance Awards  (Geoffrey Rush and Susan Sarandon).

 

 

GOD OF CARNAGE has been nominated for Distinguished Production of a Play and two nominations for the Distinguished Performance Award (Marcia Gay Harden and James Gandolfini).

 

 

MARY STUART has been nominated Distinguished Revival of a Play and two Distinguished Performance Awards (Janet McTeer, Harriet Walter).

 

 

THE NORMAN CONQUESTS has been nominated for Distinguished Revival of a Play and Distinguished Performance Award (Ben Miles).

 

 

PAL JOEY has been nominated for Distinguished Revival of a Musical and Distinguished Performance Award (Martha Plimpton).

 

 

RUINED has been nominated for Distinguished Production of a Play (Lynn Nottage) and Distinguished Performance Award (Saidah Arrika Ekulona).

 

 

THE SEAGULL has been nominated for Distinguished Revival of a Play and Distinguished Performance Award (Kristin Scott Thomas).  

 

 

SHREK THE MUSICAL has been nominated for Distinguished Production of a Musical and two Distinguished Performance  Awards (Sutton Foster , Christopher Sieber).

 

 

WAITING FOR GODOT has been nominated for two Distinguished Performance Awards  (John Glover , Bill Irwin).

 

 

Not for profit company nominations:

 

ATLANTIC THEATER COMPANY has been honored with two nominations for THE CRIPPLE OF INISHMAAN.

 

 

MANHATAN THEATRE CLUB productions have been honored with three nominations including two for RUINED and one for ACCENT ON YOUTH.

 

 

ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY productions have been honored with five nominations including two for WAITING FOR GODOT, two for PAL JOEY and onefor DISTRACTED. In addition past recipients of the Distinguished Performance Award will be honored on the dais for their work this season which includes: Stockard Channing (PAL JOEY), Frank Langella (A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS) and Mary-Louise Parker (HEDDA GABLER). 

 

 

 TO READ THE COMPLETE LIST OF NOMINEES, VISIT: http://tinyurl.com/c7f89a

WAITING FOR GODOT’S GOODMAN IN NY TIMES

Roundabout Theatre Company’s WAITING FOR GODOT is playing at Studio 54 on Broadway

The New York Times

April 19, 2009

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/19/theater/19mcgr.html

 

Arts & Leisure

Big Man Tries Beckett

 

By CHARLES McGRATH

 

IN his dressing room last week John Goodman stood up, emitted a long, blaring foghorn blast and then announced in a loudspeaker voice, “Now docking. …” He was describing his Act I entrance as Pozzo, his first theatrical role in four years, in the Roundabout Theater Company production of “Waiting for Godot,” which opens April 30 at Studio 54.

 

Mr. Goodman is a big man – he’s 6 foot 3, and his weight these days hovers around 300 pounds – and in his Pozzo getup he seems even bigger. He wears a derby, boots and a voluminous riding suit with jodhpurs, and when he comes onstage, at the end of a long rope attached to his hapless slave, Lucky (played by John Glover), he does seem a bit like an ocean liner. Vladimir and Estragon (played by Bill Irwin and Nathan Lane) look astonished, and rightly so.

 

Pozzo is the least sympathetic and in some ways the trickiest character in “Godot.” He cruelly mistreats Lucky, and yet he is as lost and vulnerable as all the others. He is “an insecure gasbag who needs to be listened to and have things done for him,” as Mr. Goodman put it. “He’s like the Macy’s blimp no one wants to look at.” Pozzo spouts a lot of fustian and hot air, and Mr. Goodman said he was still trying to figure out the right voice for it. His Pozzo speaks in a deep, Goodmanesque rumble but with a lordly British accent.

 

“It’s just a voice I heard in my head,” Mr. Goodman explained, “along with all the other voices there – the barking dogs and the rest. I need to make it more distinctly American, sort of like Bill Buckley. I’m trying to make it more a patrician Yankee voice, but I worry that’s not going to sell. It’s going to sound like a bad English accent. So it’s something I’m still searching for.”

 

Mr. Goodman is good at voices. In the course of a hour or so he imitated Peter O’Toole, Joe Franklin, a pretentious critic and an aged horse, complete with snuffling and foot stomping. But there were also sighs, long pauses, Beckett-like silences and moments when Mr. Goodman’s inner critic would cut him off midsentence.

Mr. Goodman, as anyone knows who has seen one of his several “Saturday Night Live” performances, can be a very funny man. His huge face is rubbery and expressive, made for comedy. He moves lightly and is a more than decent blues singer.

 

Over four decades, appearing in roughly three movies a year, he has played a king, a governor, Babe Ruth and a Stone Age caveman, Fred Flintstone. On “The West Wing” he has been a Republican speaker of the House who temporarily takes over for the president. But as is so often the case with actors his size, he is more often the second banana, the comic foil. His most famous role is Dan Conner, the henpecked husband on “Roseanne.”

 

In person Mr. Goodman is not the stereotypical jolly fat man. For all his success, he remains full of self-doubt. Compliments make him wince, and his conversational default mode is self-deprecation. He sometimes seems to be eyeing himself with suspicion.

 

Mr. Goodman’s friend Tom Arnold, whom he got to know during the years he starred on “Roseanne,” said: “John is much too hard on himself. He’s got that thing. I have it too. That fat kid thing. No matter what, we look in a mirror, and that’s what we see. It comes out in a lot of different ways. I’ve seen him pounding walls over a line in a sitcom. Probably it wasn’t even a good line, but John thinks he should have done it better.”

 

Mr. Goodman, who said he quit drinking a year and a half ago, is trying these days not to beat up on himself so much. “I could never please myself,” he explained. “That’s part of what fuels the alcoholic, I guess. You set yourself impossible goals, and then you kick yourself because you’re not good enough. But I can’t do that every night. I don’t have the energy anymore.”

 

He added: “I don’t know how much the old Jackie Daniels franchise ruined my memory, which is going anyway, because of my advancing decrepitude. I had a 30-year run, and at the end I didn’t care about anything. I was just fed up with myself. I didn’t even want to be an actor anymore.” Indicating his dressing room and the stage, a floor below, he said, “But this is nice. I like this way it is now – now that I’m in my dotage.” (He gave his age as 84, but he is only 56.)

In an e-mail message Mr. Arnold said he thought Mr. Goodman’s blue-collar roots had something to do with his temperament. He’s a “Midwestern boy who comes from a place where accepting praise and accolades is physically painful and even the hint of confidence in one’s talents is sin No. 1,” he wrote.

 

Mr. Goodman was born and grew up in Affton, Mo., a working-class suburb of St. Louis. His father, a letter carrier, died when Mr. Goodman was 2, and his mother raised him, a younger sister and an older brother while working as a waitress and a drugstore cashier. He played football in high school – badly, he says – and also acted a bit. He went to junior college for a year and then transferred to Southwest Missouri State. He “wasted a year in the keg,” he said, but then discovered Southwest’s unusually good drama program. Among his classmates were Kathleen Turner and Tess Harper.

 

In 1975, with a modest bankroll from his brother, Mr. Goodman moved to New York and scrounged for acting work. He found an apartment at Ninth Ave and 51st Street, not far, as it happens, from his current digs at Studio 54. He gave up waiting and bartending, he said, because nobody would hire him. Instead he appeared in dinner theater, did voice-overs and commercials. If you needed a beefy, construction-worker type, Mr. Goodman was your man. He was also the guy who slapped himself in a commercial for Mennen Skin Bracer.

 

“I did anything I could put my hands on,” he said. “I didn’t have any fallback skills. Eventually I got my Equity card and started making enough money to become a full-time alcoholic.”

 

In 1978 he appeared with Nathan Lane in a production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” that had, he said, shaking his head, a “disco slant.” “I weighed about 178, and I was Oberon,” he added. “I coulda been a contender.”

 

The film that put Mr. Goodman on the map was probably “Revenge of the Nerds” (he was the football coach), but he began attracting critical attention with the string of movies that he made with the Coen brothers: “Raising Arizona,” “Barton Fink,” “The Big Lebowski” and “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” Walter, the hotheaded, paranoid, buzz-cut Vietnam vet in “Lebowski” remains his favorite part. In all the Coen brothers’ movies, come to think of it, he plays someone who is either menacing or about to erupt. He’s like a tank of volatile, pressurized hydrogen.

 

And of course Mr. Goodman will forever be associated with Dan Conner, the working stiff he played so memorably on “Roseanne,” giving the part not just size and humor but also an edge of melancholy. Mr. Goodman now looks back fondly on the “Roseanne” years, but for a while, he said, he felt trapped in the show.

 

 

Click here to read the full article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/19/theater/19mcgr.html  

2008-2009 OUTER CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD NOMINATIONS

2008-2009 OUTER CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD NOMINATIONS

 

Nominations for the 59th annual Outer Critics Circle Awards, celebrating excellence in Broadway and Off-Broadway theatre, were announced this morning.

 

 

 

33 VARIATIONS has been nominated for five Outer Critics Circle Awards including: Outstanding New Broadway Play (Moisés Kaufman), Outstanding Director of a Play (Moisés Kaufman), Outstanding Featured Actor in a Play (Zach Grenier), Outstanding Set Design (Derek McLane) and Outstanding Lighting Design (David Lander).

 

 

A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS has been nominated for one Outer Critic’s Circle Award including: Outstanding Featured Actor in a Play (Patrick Page).

 

 

BODY AWARENESS has received a John Gassner Award nomination for playwright Annie Baker.

 

 

THE CRIPPLE OF INISHMAAN has received three nominations, including Outstanding Revival of a Play (Broadway or Off-Broadway), Outstanding Director of a Play (Garry Hynes), and Outstanding Featured Actor in a Play (David Pearse).

 

 

EXIT THE KING by Eugene Ionesco has been nominated for two Outer Critics Circle Awards, including: Outstanding Actor in a Play (Geoffrey Rush), and Outstanding Featured Actress in a Play (Andrea Martin). The production is directed by Neil Armfield.

 

 

FARRAGUT NORTH has received two nominations: Outstanding New Off-Broadway Play and the John Gassner Award (Beau Willimon).

 

 

GOD OF CARNAGE by Yasmina Reza has been nominated for two Outer Critics Circle Awards, including: Outstanding New Play and Outstanding Actress in a play (Marcia Gay Harden). The production is directed by Matthew Warchus.

 

 

HUMOR ABUSE, which just concluded its extended run at MTC, has received a nomination for Outstanding Solo Performance (Lorenzo Pisoni).

 

 

MARY STUART has been nominated for three Outer Critics Circle Awards: Outstanding Actress in a Play (Janet McTeer, Harriet Walter) and Outstanding Featured Actor in a Play (John Benjamin Hickey).

 

 

THE NORMAN CONQUESTS has been nominated for two Outer Critics Circle Awards: Outstanding Revival of a Play and Outstanding Director of a Play (Matthew Warchus).  The production has won an award for Outstanding Ensemble Performance for the cast (Amelia Bullmore, Jessica Hynes, Stephen Mangan, Ben Miles, Paul Ritter, Amanda Root).

 

 

PAL JOEY has been nominated for two Outer Critics Circle Awards including: Outstanding Revival of a Musical and Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical (Martha Plimpton).

 

 

RUINED, currently at Manhattan Theatre Club, has received five Outer Critics Circle Award nominations: Outstanding Off-Broadway Play, Outstanding Lead Actress (Saidah Arrika Ekulona), Outstanding Featured Actor (Russell G. Jones), Outstanding Featured Actress (Condola Rashad), and Outstanding Lighting Design (Peter Kaczorowski).

 

 

SHREK THE MUSICAL has been nominated for 10 Outer Critics Circle Awards, including: Outstanding New Broadway Musical, Outstanding New Score (David Lindsay-Abaire & Jeanine Tesori), Outstanding Director of a Musical (Jason Moore), Outstanding Choreographer (Josh Prince), Outstanding Set Design (Tim Hatley), Outstanding Costume Design (Tim Hatley), Outstanding Actor in a Musical (Brian d’Arcy James), Outstanding Actress in a Musical (Sutton Foster), Outstanding Featured Actor in a Musical (Daniel Breaker), Outstanding Featured Actor in a Musical (Christopher Sieber).

 

 

WAITING FOR GODOT has been nominated for five Outer Critics Circle Awards including: Outstanding Revival of a Play, Outstanding Actor in a Play (Bill Irwin & Nathan Lane) Outstanding Director of a Play (Anthony Page) and Outstanding Set Design

(Santo Loquasto).

 

 

WHAT’S THAT SMELL? THE MUSIC OF JACOB STERLING has received two nominations, for Outstanding New Off-Broadway Musical and Outstanding Actor in a Musical (David Pittu).

 

 

ATLANTIC THEATER COMPANY productions have been honored with eight nominations: including three for THE CRIPPLE OF INISHMAAN, two for FARRUGUT NORTH, two for WHAT’S THAT SMELL? THE MUSIC OF JACOB STERLING and one for BODY AWARENESS

 

 

MANHATAN THEATRE CLUB productions have been honored with six Outer Critics Circle nominations: RUINED, received five nominations, the most nominations for an Off-Broadway show; and one nomination for HUMOR ABUSE

 

 

ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY productions have been honored with eight nominations including five for WAITING FOR GODOT, two for PAL JOEY, and one for A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS.

 

 

TO READ THE COMPLETE LIST OF NOMINEES, VISIT:  http://tinyurl.com/crfaja