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PAL JOEY’S MATTHEW RISCH IN THE NEWS

ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY

 

Pal Joey

 

Star

Matthew Risch

 

In the News

 

Pal Joey opens tonight on Broadway at Studio 54

 

Matthew Risch, currently starring as “Joey Evans” in Roundabout Theatre Company’s PAL JOEY, is in the news.

 

Click the links below to learn more about Matthew’s role in this classic Rodgers and Hart musical:

 

Playbill.com:

Brief Encounter

 

Broadway.com:

Fresh Face

Opening Night video

 

NPR’s “Morning Edition”:

Pal Joey on NPR

 

Roundabout Theatre Company (Todd Haimes, Artistic Director) presents Stockard Channing (Vera Simpson), Matthew Risch (Joey Evans) and Martha Plimpton (Gladys Bumps) in this new Broadway production. PAL JOEY features a new book by Tony¬ģ Award winner Richard Greenberg , based on the original book by John O’Hara, with music direction by Tony¬ģ Award winner Paul Gemignani, choreography by Graciela Daniele and directed by two-time Tony¬ģ Award winner Joe Mantello at Studio 54 on Broadway.

 

PAL JOEY opens officially tonight on Broadway at Studio 54 (254 West 54th Street).  This is a limited engagement through February 15th, 2009.

 

Set in Chicago in the late 1930s, PAL JOEY is the story of Joey Evans, a brash, scheming song and dance man with dreams of owning his own nightclub.¬†¬† Joey abandons his wholesome girlfriend Linda English, to charm a rich, married older woman, Vera Simpson, in the hope that she’ll set him up in business.¬†

 

The Rodgers & Hart score for PAL JOEY includes such classic songs as “Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered,” “I Could Write a Book,” “You Mustn’t Kick It Around,” and “Zip,” among others.¬†¬† The new production of PAL JOEY will also feature “I’m Talking to My Pal,” a song that had been dropped from the score during its out-of-town tryout.

           

TICKET INFORMATION & PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE:

Tickets are available by phone at (212) 719-1300, online at www.roundabouttheatre.org or at the Studio 54 Box Office (254 West 54th Street).  Tickets on Tuesdays, Wednesdays & Thursdays range from $36.50 to $121.50.  Tickets on Fridays, Saturdays & Sundays range from $36.50 to $126.50. 

 

Pal Joey plays Tuesday through Saturday evenings at 8:00PM with a Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday matinee at 2:00PM.

 

www.roundabouttheatre.org

 

#          #          # 

PAL JOEY STAR STOCKARD CHANNING IN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Roundabout Theatre Company’s PAL JOEY opens on Broadway tonight, Thursday, December 18 at Studio 54.

 

ASSOCIATED PRESS

December 18, 2008

 

Stockard Channing, back singing on Broadway, is ‘wild again, beguiled again’

By Mark Kennedy

 

 

NEW YORK (AP) – If you want Stockard Channing eating out of your hand – and who doesn’t? – just compliment her pipes.

The 64-year-old Tony and Emmy winner is singing on Broadway for the first time since 1984 and would appreciate a little encouragement.

Channing has four songs in the update of the Richard Rogers-Lorenz Hart musical “Pal Joey,” including the stunning “Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered.”

“It’s great to sing again,” she says before a recent preview performance. “You know how you sing in the shower or you sing in your head? The issue is to get the stuff that’s in your head out of your mouth.”

To get in the mood to sing “Bewitched” – with its lyrics “I’m wild again, beguiled again/A simpering, whimpering child again” – Channing listened to a CD of the greats who covered it, including Frank Sinatra and Mel Torme.

“I had a tradition to be part of: I wasn’t just going to talk the song,” she says. “If anyone says that they love the way I do ‘Bewitched,’ I’m theirs forever. I’ll be honest with you. If you really want to get into my heart, that’s all you have to say.”

Set in Chicago in the late 1930s, “Pal Joey” tells the story of a venal song-and-dance man who is romancing two women: a wholesome girl, and a wealthy, married older woman, Vera Simpson, played by Channing.

“She is the original cougar,” Channing says, with a smile.

Of the sexy show, she says, “It’s more Billy Wilder than Walt Disney. I wouldn’t bring your 10-year-old.” Then she thinks better of it: “Oh, who knows? Maybe. Why not? Ten-year-olds these days.”

The current production has had a rocky start, with the original Joey – Christian Hoff – leaving about a week into previews after sustaining a foot injury while on stage.

“We were all stunned,” says Channing, who credits Hoff’s understudy, Matthew Risch, for valiantly stepping into the role. “It really has been extraordinary. But there’s no business like show business.”

Channing knows all about that: She’s been a fixture on stage, TV and film since making her debut as an undergrad in a Harvard University production of “The Threepenny Opera.”

She first hit Broadway in 1971 in “Two Gentlemen of Verona” and her early film credits include the 1978 movie version of “Grease,” in which she played bad girl Rizzo.

She won the 1985 Tony for her role in “A Day in the Life of Joe Egg,” and went on to act in “Six Degrees of Separation” on stage and in the film version, which earned her an Oscar nomination. She has most recently been recognized for her role as first lady on the former NBC series “The West Wing.”

Along the way, she’s tried to avoid what she calls “pinata parts” – those roles for older actresses that call for grotesque monsters, such as drunken mothers-in-law.

“Your job is to come out there and have people with sticks beat you,” she says, ruefully. “For women of a certain age, unfortunately, that’s a pinata part to me.”

Her latest role is definitely not like that, and Channing is visibly pumped to exercise both her pipes and live theater muscles.

“It’s really exciting to remember what this thing is like, having this big plane lift off the ground and just go,” she says. “It’s really thrilling.”

 

To read the entire story, click here:

http://www.newsday.com/entertainment/news/wire/sns-ap-theater-stockard-channing,0,4729411.story

 

 

 

PAL JOEY’S STOCKARD CHANNING FEATURED IN W MAGAZINE

 

ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY

 

PAL JOEY

Star  

 STOCKARD CHANNING

 

FEATURED IN THE CURRENT ISSUE OF

W MAGAZINE

 

On stands now!

 

Stockard Channing, star of the Roundabout Theatre Company’s Broadway production of Pal Joey, is featured in the “Eye” section of W Magazine (December Issue). Stockard Channing talks to W writer Diane Solway about her role in this highly anticipated revival that has not been seen on Broadway in over 30 years. An original portrait of Channing is included. The magazine is on stands now.¬†

 

Opening night is Thursday, December 18th

On Broadway at Studio 54

 

Roundabout Theatre Company (Todd Haimes, Artistic Director), in association with Marc Platt, presents Stockard Channing (Vera Simpson), Matthew Risch (Joey Evans) and Martha Plimpton (Gladys Bumps) in a new Broadway production of Pal Joey with Robert Clohessy (Mike), Jenny Fellner (Linda English), Daniel Marcus (Ludlow Lowell), Steven Skybell  (Ernest), Timothy J. Alex, Brian Barry, Kurt Froman, Bahiyah Sayyed Gaines, Lisa Gajda,         

Anthony Holds, Nadine Isenegger, Mark Morettini, Kathryn Mowat Murphy, Abbey O’Brien, Hayley Podschun, Krista Saab and Eric Sciotto.¬†

 

PAL JOEY features a new book by Tony¬ģ Award winner Richard Greenberg , based on the original book by John O’Hara, with musical direction by Tony¬ģ Award winner Paul Gemignani, choreography by Graciela Daniele and directed by two-time Tony¬ģ Award winner Joe Mantello at Studio 54 on Broadway.

 

PAL JOEY opens officially on Thursday, December 18th, 2008 at Studio 54 on Broadway (254 West 54th Street).  This will be a limited engagement through February 15th, 2009.

 

Set in Chicago in the late 1930s, PAL JOEY is the story of Joey Evans, a brash, scheming song and dance man with dreams of owning his own nightclub.¬†¬† Joey abandons his wholesome girlfriend Linda English, to charm a rich, married older woman, Vera Simpson, in the hope that she’ll set him up in business.¬†

 

TICKET INFORMATION & PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE:

Tickets are available by phone at (212) 719-1300, online at www.roundabouttheatre.org or at the Studio 54 Box Office (254 West 54th Street).  Tickets on Tuesdays, Wednesdays & Thursdays range from $36.50 to $121.50.  Tickets on Fridays, Saturdays & Sundays range from $36.50 to $126.50. 

 

Pal Joey will play Tuesday through Saturday evenings at 8:00PM with a Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday matinee at 2:00PM.

 

www.roundabouttheatre.org

###  

 

PAL JOEY STAR STOCKARD CHANNING IN NY TIMES

NEW YORK TIMES, Arts & Leisure

December 7, 2008

 

Bewitched, Bothered and Back

By ERIK PIEPENBURG

 

To experience the audio slideshow click here:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2008/12/07/theater/20081207-stockard-channing/index.html#

 

 

HOW you know the name Stockard Channing may depend on how you’re entertained. She was the naughty bun-in-the-oven Rizzo, with Olivia Newton-John and John Travolta, in the 1978 movie adaptation of “Grease.” Theater fans remember her as Ouisa Kittredge in John Guare’s play “Six Degrees of Separation” in 1990 (she reprised the role in the 1993 film adaptation, which also starred Will Smith and Donald Sutherland). And for several seasons she was Abbey Bartlet, the wife of the president on the NBC series “The West Wing.”

“It’s interesting to be known as an errant teenager or the first lady of the United States, depending who you’re talking to,” Ms. Channing said.

 

Last seen on Broadway in the 1999 revival of “The Lion in Winter” opposite Laurence Fishburne, Ms. Channing, 64, is returning as Vera Simpson in the Roundabout Theater Company’s production of the Rodgers and Hart musical “Pal Joey” at Studio 54. The show, with a new book by the playwright Richard Greenberg, is directed by Joe Mantello, with musical direction by Paul Gemignani.

The title of Vera’s big number, “Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered,” is an apt description of the backstage dramatics that unfolded shortly after previews started. Christian Hoff, 40, who was to play Joey Evans, withdrew from the show after a foot injury and was replaced permanently by his understudy, Matthew Risch, 27. The show’s opening was pushed back a week, to Dec. 18.

Before a recent preview performance Erik Piepenburg sat down with Ms. Channing to discuss the challenges of a sudden cast change, her light-bulb moment with Brecht and Weill, and letting go of “Grease.” Excerpts from the interview follow.

 

Losing a Co-Star

It’s been hard on the company, any time you lose a member of the company so suddenly who’s been such an organic part of the creative process. … You can see how demanding the show is physically. I obviously wasn’t present for these conversations, but everybody had to make a quick decision. I think from his part, to bow out – he could injure himself permanently if he came back too soon. The temptation in any kind of athletic situation, I think, is “I don’t want to let the team down,” which is very much Christian’s way. … It was terribly dramatic because we had to cancel the Saturday matinee. …We’re blessed, and we also have a great loss at the same time, which is really stressful. I’m sure it was a very painful decision for him to make.

 

Old Joey, New Joey

I think we’re telling a slightly different story. There’s a much larger gap in age, which concerns me sometimes, that Vera Simpson is not going to be arrested for robbing the cradle. On the other hand there’s a great tradition that goes back to Colette, of an older woman and a younger man. It’s been going on for a long time.

 

Vocal Chops

I said I’m not going to do this unless I go to Paul Gemignani, who is brilliant and candid. I went to talk to him and he said: “Yeah, you can do it. I’m not here to make you look bad.” Mr. Bluster. And I said, well, I’ll bow to that. I went back to my roots, which is also ironically musical roots. When I first started acting in college we did rock musicals, “Trojan Women” as a musical, all that kind of stuff we did back in those days when we were brave.

 

Acting in the ’60s

I was still an undergraduate at Harvard, but I was married. and my husband was in the business school. That was the life I was supposed to be leading. A friend of mine had come up to me at the Hasty Pudding Club and said, “I want you to audition for Jenny in ‘Threepenny Opera.’¬†” I said, “Why not?” I sang for him, and that was it. This was kind of a legendary production, as it turns out, at Harvard those days. I’ll never forget it. …

 

There was a bunch of us at Harvard around that time: Tommy Lee Jones, Jimmy Woods, John Lithgow and various other people. There was a synchronicity of a lot of young talent and energy. Singing that song, telling the story of that song, I went home and could not sleep. I knew a thunderbolt had happened in my life. It was very inconvenient.

 

A Theatrical Childhood

My parents would go to musicals a lot. You’d come home, and they would put records on at cocktail time. I know the complete score of “Happy Hunting,” “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes,” “South Pacific.” … I remember seeing my now good friend Elaine Stritch in “Goldilocks.” I was home from school – it was my birthday or something – and my father took me to see her. It didn’t last very long. It was a very obscure musical. It was a very long time ago. I can see it like it was yesterday. I know every word of the score.

 

To read the full story, click here:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/07/theater/07Piep.html?_r=1&ref=theater

PALL JOEY STARS CHANNING AND PLIMPTON IN NY MAGAZINE

NEW YORK MAGAZINE

December 8, 2008

 

Conversation: The Pals of ‘Pal Joey’

By Jesse Oxfeld

 

The emphasis is on the female leads in this revival of the Rodgers and Hart classic. Never mind that neither has sung onstage in 25 years.

 

In the past few seasons, Martha Plimpton has played a female pope, a Shakespearean princess, and some Russian revolutionaries; Stockard Channing played First Lady Abbey Bartlet on The West Wing and, oddly, narrates Meerkat Manor. Now they’re both belting Rodgers and Hart classics like “Bewitched, Bothered, and Bewildered” in the Roundabout revival of Pal Joey, which, with a new book by Richard Greenberg, makes its debut on December 18. (Opening night has been delayed a week, after the planned Joey, onetime Jersey Boy Christian Hoff, hurt his foot and left the production.) The two women spoke to Jesse Oxfeld.

This production is so much darker than the classic Frank Sinatra-Rita Hayworth-Kim Novak movie, which has a happy ending.
Channing: The movie was very sanitized. The play, the original play, was funky. The play was about, you know, a married woman and a young guy. In the movie, Rita Hayworth was a widow. And, a little bit conveniently, an ex-stripper.
Plimpton:So she could do [the striptease song] “Zip.”

Which Martha’s character, Gladys-who’s barely a presence in the movie-now sings. Had you read the original John O’Hara stories the play is based on?
Channing: I’d read other stuff by John O’Hara, so I knew the tone. And then Joe Mantello, our director, gave me a copy of the original play, and it’s very close in tone to this-but it’s very choppy in the second act.

So Greenberg’s work was fixing the story.
Channing: Yes. But the language is very fair-the rhythms and the bleakness of it are very, very close to the original O’Hara.

Neither of you is known as a musical star‚ÄČ…
Plimpton: It’s my first singing role as an adult. When I was a child, I did downtown musicals with the Public, and then I didn’t do another musical for 25 years, until now. This is my first [Puts on affected British accent] big Broadway show!
Channing: [To Plimpton] You told me you were doing a cabaret thing.
Plimpton: I don’t call it cabaret.
Channing: I’m outing her act!
Plimpton: I have done, you know, evenings of song. I have some friends … I did a show with Lucy Wainwright Roche and Dan Lipton at the Zipper in August. But I haven’t ever done it, you know, for money.

Stockard, have you had a major singing role since Grease?
Channing: Well, yeah, I actually replaced Liza Minnelli in The Rink.

And were you trying to get back to it?
They definitely came to me. I thought it was the stupidest idea I’d ever heard-it seemed so far-fetched. I thought, don’t you want Christine Ebersole or Bernadette Peters? [Laughs] And they didn’t; they wanted me. I tried to take that as a compliment.

Well, Vera’s an urbane, arch, sexy woman of a certain age. You see her and think, that’s clearly a Stockard Channing role.
And then she opens her mouth and sings! [Laughs]

So you were nervous about that.
I was very much aware of the responsibility of singing these songs. I mean, “Bewitched,” for God’s sakes.
Plimpton: We were both terrified. Channing: We were sitting next to each other at the first reading going, “I can’t believe we’re doing this!”
Plimpton: I think I took a beta-blocker that morning.

Pal Joey
Roundabout Theater Company at Studio 54.
Opens December 18.

To read the entire story, please click here:  http://nymag.com/arts/theater/features/52580/

 

 

 

 

 

PAL JOEY STAR IN THE NEW YORK TIMES

Roundabout Theatre Company’s production of Pal Joey is playing at Studio 54 on Broadway.

 

 

NEW YORK TIMES

November 21, 2008

 

A Jersey Boy’s Moment as Broadway’s New Pal

By PATRICK HEALY

 

It’s not every day that an actor is tapped to play a role immortalized by Gene Kelly onstage and Frank Sinatra on screen. It is not every day, either, that producers choose to revisit that role, Joey Evans in “Pal Joey,” given that it has a title character who uses and exploits women and has a legendarily uneven book that goes with the famous Rodgers and Hart score.

 

Given how risk-averse Broadway is, such a role might seem reserved for a bankable, household-name star who guarantees the extraordinary charisma that the rakish, antihero Joey must project – a Harry Connick Jr., say, or a Hugh Jackman, both rumored as potential Joeys in recent years.

 

So the weight of history and high expectations now sits on the shoulders of one Christian Hoff. He is not a household name; he is not a bankable star. What he is – besides the lead in Roundabout Theater Company’s revival of “Pal Joey,” now in previews at Studio 54 – is a Broadway classic himself: a determined, confident actor who found midcareer fame (and a featured-performance Tony) as Tommy DeVito in “Jersey Boys” and has his first shot at a major leading role.

 

For Mr. Hoff the role is one he said he was born to play after years as guys “you would not want your daughter to date.”

“The success I’m having right now is the result of 32 years of hard work and perseverance and my share of struggle to get to this point to go to the next step and lead one of our of great American musicals,” Mr. Hoff said in an interview on Monday in the quiet New Jersey suburb of Milburn, where he lives with his wife, Melissa, and their young daughter.

 

“And the most challenging part of this is realizing that everything I need to do to succeed in this role is there,” he said. “I just need to exercise it. Everything I am, I’ve got to pull out: my dark side, humor, charm, my song-and-dance man, my go-getter, my cutthroat Machiavellian side. But it’s on me to make it happen.”

 

Mr. Hoff said he was not intimidated by the expectations for the show, which is having its first Broadway revival in more than 30 years, or by comparisons to Kelly or Sinatra, who performed in a film version that was significantly different from the stage musical. During an hour and a half of conversation he exuded a mix of certainty and humility about his success, speaking evenly and forcefully. At one point during the interview, his lawyer called to talk about Mr. Huff’s custody battle with his first wife over his two other children; he took note of the lawyer’s number and continued talking, not thrown off a smidge by his offstage family drama.

 

“Rather than follow in the footsteps of the great icons who have played the role of Joey Evans – Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra, Bob Fosse – as an actor I’m enjoying filling the shoes of Joey Evans as a character and taking it to that level,” Mr. Hoff, 40, said.

 

“Having that history gives me a real sense of responsibility,” he added. “But I don’t feel the weight of history. Some would, but there’s so much more to this story and its impact on the audience. I’m relishing in that and not any expectation or preconception. We are defining what this show is, not redefining.”

 

Based on several New Yorker short stories by John O’Hara about a rakish, scheming song-and-dance man, the musical is known far better for its songs – gold-plate standards like “Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered,” “I Could Write a Book” and “Zip” – than for ever being seen by audiences. Mr. Hoff himself was only vaguely familiar with its story and history when he was approached about the part, amid the runaway commercial success of “Jersey Boys.”

 

“I had no idea what it was about, no idea of all of the songs that were in it, no idea of who was in it, and no idea what an underdog it was,” Mr. Hoff said.

 

He said he instantly connected with Joey, in no small part because he was the sort of lovably roguish character that Mr. Hoff has long played, like Tommy DeVito, the real-life Four Seasons singer who struggled with gambling debts and inner demons. On television he has appeared on “Law & Order: Criminal Intent” and as a roguish district attorney on “Ugly Betty.” For decades he has played supporting characters who have dark or troubled sides, though he also became known for playing a lighter role, as the voice of the cartoon character Richie Rich.

 

As he prepared to play Joey, Mr. Hoff grew excited that he could define a role for audiences who might be drawn to a flawed central character more than they were in Kelly’s day, for the premiere in 1940. Reviews then were mixed to negative.

 

“People are willing to accept a musical about an ambitious antihero and those who enable him to succeed – and who ultimately pull the rug from under him,” Mr. Hoff said.

 

“People are ready to see and identify with a character who is less than perfect,” he continued. “We all have something in common with Joey Evans. We all want to please people, we all fancy ourselves as altruistic, and yet it is inevitable that we are self-serving ultimately. The only question is, where along the line do you learn the difference between ambition and abuse of power?”

 

The artistic director of Roundabout, Todd Haimes, began mulling a revival of “Pal Joey” 11 years ago, after reading a new book for the musical by the playwright Richard Greenberg (“Take Me Out,” “Three Days of Rain”). In an interview this week Mr. Haimes said he thought the Greenberg adaptation transformed the original “flawed book” by enriching the dialogue and sharpening the characters of not only Joey but the women in his life, like the damaged society wife Vera Simpson (Stockard Channing) and the wronged chanteuse Gladys Bumps (Martha Plimpton). In other words, there would be a stronger story that might match the well-known songs.

 

“When it was written in 1938, and I’m speculating here, you couldn’t go to as dark a place as you can go now,” Mr. Haimes said. “It’s certainly not something that’s done in high schools.” But the rights to the show remained in the hands of commercial producers for a long nine years. There were fits and starts over that time: a 1998 reading with Mr. Connick, talk of a production directed by Robert Altman. Eventually Roundabout acquired the rights, and Mr. Haimes enlisted one of his favorite directors, Joe Mantello, who decided early that he wanted Mr. Hoff – based largely on his work in “Jersey Boys”- and Ms. Channing.

 

To read the entire story, clike here:  http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/21/theater/21hoff.html?_r=1&ref=theater 

ROUNDABOUT’S PAL JOEY BEGINS PREVIEWS TONIGHT

ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY

 

Previews begin tonight!

 

STOCKARD CHANNING     CHRISTIAN HOFF

MARTHA PLIMPTON

star in a new Broadway production of

PAL JOEY

 

with

Robert Clohessy, Jenny Fellner, Daniel Marcus, Steven Skybell

Timothy J. Alex, Brian Barry, Bahiyah Sayyed Gaines, Lisa Gajda,

Anthony Holds, Nadine Isenegger, Mark Morettini, Kathryn Mowat Murphy,

Abbey O’Brien, Hayley Podschun, Matthew Risch, Krista Saab, Eric Sciotto

 

Music by RICHARD RODGERS       Lyrics by LORENZ HART

New Book by RICHARD GREENBERG

Based on the original book by JOHN O’HARA

 

Music Direction by PAUL GEMIGNANI

Choreography by GRACIELA DANIELE

Directed by JOE MANTELLO

 

Official Opening Thursday, December 11th, 2008

on Broadway at Studio 54

 

Roundabout Theatre Company’s (Todd Haimes, Artistic Director) Pal Joey will begin previews tonight, Friday, November 14th at 8:00PM. Pal Joey stars Stockard Channing (Vera Simpson), Christian Hoff (Joey Evans) and Martha Plimpton (Gladys Bumps) with Robert Clohessy (Mike), Jenny Fellner (Linda English), Daniel Marcus (Ludlow Lowell), Steven Skybell ¬†(Ernest), Timothy J. Alex, Brian Barry, Bahiyah Sayyed Gaines, Lisa Gajda, Anthony Holds, Nadine Isenegger, Mark Morettini, Kathryn Mowat Murphy, Abbey O’Brien, Hayley Podschun, Matthew Risch, Krista Saab and Eric Sciotto.¬†

 

PAL JOEY features a new book by Tony¬ģ Award winner Richard Greenberg , based on the original book by John O’Hara, with music direction by Tony¬ģ Award winner Paul Gemignani, choreography by Graciela Daniele, directed by two-time Tony¬ģ Award winner Joe Mantello at Studio 54 on Broadway.

 

PAL JOEY opens officially on Thursday, December 11th, 2008 at Studio 54 on Broadway (254 West 54th Street).  This will be a limited engagement through February 15th, 2009.

 

The design team includes two-time Tony¬ģ Award winner Scott Pask (Sets), five-time Tony¬ģ Award winner William Ivey Long (Costumes), Tony¬ģ Award nominee Paul Gallo (Lights), Tony Meola (Sound), Don Sebesky (Orchestrator), Eric Stern (Dance Arranger) and Paul Huntley (Hair and Wig Design)..

             

Set in Chicago in the late 1930s, PAL JOEY is the story of Joey Evans, a brash, scheming song and dance man with dreams of owning his own nightclub.¬†¬† Joey abandons his wholesome girlfriend Linda English, to charm a rich, married older woman, Vera Simpson, in the hope that she’ll set him up in business.¬†

 

TICKET INFORMATION & PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE:

Tickets are available by phone at (212) 719-1300, online at www.roundabouttheatre.org or at the Studio 54 Box Office (254 West 54th Street).  Ticket prices range from $36.50 to $121.50. 

 

Pal Joey will play Tuesday through Saturday evenings at 8:00PM with a Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday matinee at 2:00PM.

 

Through ACCESS Roundabout, 100 tickets will be available for the first preview performance (November 14th) for only $10 each. 

 

www.roundabouttheatre.org

### 

 

 

 

PAL JOEY FEATURED IN VOGUE MAGAZINE

ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY

 

PAL JOEY

Star CHRISTIAN HOFF

 

FEATURED IN THE CURRENT ISSUE OF

VOGUE MAGAZINE

 

On stands now!

 

Christian Hoff, star of the Roundabout Theatre Company’s Broadway production of Pal Joey, is featured in the “People Are Talking About” section of Vogue Magazine (November Issue). Christian Hoff talks to Vogue writer Adam Green about this highly anticipated revival that has not been seen on Broadway in more than 30 years. An original photograph of Hoff is included. The magazine is on stands now.¬†

 

Pal Joey begins previews on Friday, November 14th 

Opening night is Thursday, December 11th

 

Roundabout Theatre Company (Todd Haimes, Artistic Director), in association with Marc Platt, presents Stockard Channing (Vera Simpson), Christian Hoff (Joey Evans) and Martha Plimpton (Gladys Bumps) in a new Broadway production of Pal Joey  with Robert Clohessy (Mike), Jenny Fellner (Linda English), Daniel Marcus (Ludlow Lowell), Steven Skybell  (Ernest), Timothy J. Alex, Brian Barry, Bahiyah Sayyed Gaines, Lisa Gajda, Anthony Holds,

Nadine Isenegger, Mark Morettini, Kathryn Mowat Murphy, Abbey O’Brien, Hayley Podschun, Matthew Risch, Krista Saab and Eric Sciotto. ¬†

 

PAL JOEY will feature a new book by Tony¬ģ Award winner Richard Greenberg , based on the original book by John O’Hara, with music direction by Tony¬ģ Award winner Paul Gemignani, choreography by Graciela Daniele and directed by two-time Tony¬ģ Award winner Joe Mantello at Studio 54 on Broadway.

 

PAL JOEY will begin previews on Friday, November 14th, 2008 and opens officially on Thursday, December 11th, 2008 at Studio 54 on Broadway (254 West 54th Street).  This will be a limited engagement through February 15th, 2009.

 

The design team includes two-time Tony¬ģ Award winner Scott Pask (Sets), five-time Tony¬ģ Award winner William Ivey Long (Costumes), Tony¬ģ Award nominee Paul Gallo (Lights), Tony Meola (Sound), Don Sebesky (Orchestrator), Eric Stern (Dance Arranger) and Paul Huntley (Hair and Wig Design).

Set in Chicago in the late 1930s, PAL JOEY is the story of Joey Evans, a brash, scheming song and dance man with dreams of owning his own nightclub.¬†¬† Joey abandons his wholesome girlfriend Linda English, to charm a rich, married older woman, Vera Simpson, in the hope that she’ll set him up in business.¬†

 

TICKET INFORMATION & PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE:

Tickets are available by phone at (212) 719-1300, online at www.roundabouttheatre.org or at the Studio 54 Box Office (254 West 54th Street).  Ticket prices range from $36.50 to $121.50. 

 

Pal Joey will play Tuesday through Saturday evenings at 8:00PM with a Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday matinee at 2:00PM.

 

Through ACCESS Roundabout, 100 tickets will be available for the first preview performance (November 14th) for only $10 each. 

 

www.roundabouttheatre.org

###  

 

PAL JOEY’S STOCKARD CHANNING FEATURED IN THE JOURNAL NEWS

The Journal News

September 28, 2008

 

http://www.lohud.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080928/ENTERTAINMENT/809280307/1164

 

Stockard Channing returns to Broadway

 

Peter D. Kramer

 

Stockard Channing has been in stage musicals and movies. She knows the difference.

 

But she’s concerned that people who come to see her latest musical – the first Broadway revival of Rodgers & Hart’s musical “Pal Joey” in 32 years, at the Roundabout’s Studio 54 theater this fall – will be coming to see the 1957 movie that starred Frank Sinatra, Kim Novak and Rita Hayworth.

 

“It’s so different,” says Channing. “I watched it a couple of weeks ago and I thought ‘My goodness! People are going to expect a whole other thing, a whole other story.'”

 

The musical, which first opened on Christmas Day 1940 and ran for 374 performances, was based on John O’Hara’s stories about a rakish 1930s Chicago nightclub singer, Joey Evans, who claimed to be everyone’s pal. He meets a woman of means who agrees to keep him in a style to which he could easily become accustomed.

 

The original production starred Gene Kelly as Joey and Vivienne Segal as Vera Simpson. At Studio 54, it’ll be Christian Hoff (“Jersey Boys”) and Channing.

 

The 1957 movie was a Sinatra vehicle set in San Francisco, but it was less dark than its original material.

 

“Frank Sinatra is fabulous, as are the women, but they gotta have that so-called ‘happy ending,'” says Channing. “Rita is a widow, there’s no adultery and some intimations of some sex, but not with Kim. It was the mid-’50s.”

 

The Roundabout revival isn’t the movie, but it also isn’t the original play. Richard Greenberg (“Take Me Out”) has written a new adaptation of the story.

 

“Vera is still Vera,” Channing says. “She’s a woman of considerable means.”

 

There’s little to like about this cougar or the man she keeps.

 

“Joey’s the antihero,” Channing says. “I can’t imagine what it was like when it first hit the stage. That’s what made it groundbreaking, and the whole loucheness, low-life aspect of it was embraced more than people were used to. Not to mention a married woman keeping this guy as a paramour in a musical, no less.”

 

Vera sings five songs, not the least of which is “Bewitched, Bothered, Bewildered,” a Rodgers & Hart classic.

 

People who only know Channing from her eight-year run as first lady Abbey Bartlet in “The West Wing” may not know that she made her Broadway debut in a musical version of “Two Gentlemen of Verona” in 1971.

 

“I was in the chorus and an understudy and I ended up taking over one of the leads in New York and on the road. That’s what brought me to Los Angeles and really started everything rolling,” she says.

 Click here to read the full feature:

http://www.lohud.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080928/ENTERTAINMENT/809280307/1164

ROUNDABOUT ANNOUNCES THE FULL CAST FOR PAL JOEY

ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY

in association with

Marc Platt

 

Is pleased to announce the full company

joining previously announced stars

 

STOCKARD CHANNING     CHRISTIAN HOFF    

MARTHA PLIMPTON

in a new Broadway production of

PAL JOEY

 

The full cast will also include:

Robert Clohessy, Jenny Fellner, Daniel Marcus, Steven Skybell

Timothy J. Alex, Brian Barry, Bahiyah Sayyed Gaines, Lisa Gajda,

Anthony Holds, Nadine Isenegger, Mark Morettini, Kathryn Mowat Murphy,

Abbey O’Brien, Hayley Podschun, Matthew Risch, Krista Saab, Eric Sciotto

 

Music by RICHARD RODGERS       Lyrics by LORENZ HART

New Book by RICHARD GREENBERG

Based on the original book by JOHN O’HARA

 

Music Direction by PAUL GEMIGNANI

Choreography by GRACIELA DANIELE

Directed by JOE MANTELLO

 

Previews begin Friday, November 14th, 2008

Official Opening Thursday, December 11th, 2008

on Broadway at Studio 54

 

Roundabout Theatre Company (Todd Haimes, Artistic Director), in association with Marc Platt, is pleased to announce the full Broadway company for Pal Joey. Joining previously announced stars Stockard Channing (Vera Simpson), Christian Hoff (Joey Evans) and Martha Plimpton (Gladys Bumps) are Robert Clohessy (Mike), Jenny Fellner (Linda English), Daniel Marcus (Ludlow Lowell), Steven Skybell ¬†(Ernest), Timothy J. Alex, Brian Barry, Bahiyah Sayyed Gaines, Lisa Gajda, Anthony Holds, Nadine Isenegger, Mark Morettini, Kathryn Mowat Murphy, Abbey O’Brien, Hayley Podschun, Matthew Risch, Krista Saab and Eric Sciotto.¬†¬†¬†

 

PAL JOEY will feature a new book by Tony¬ģ Award winner Richard Greenberg , based on the original book by John O’Hara, with music direction by Tony¬ģ Award winner Paul Gemignani, choreography by Graciela Daniele and directed by two-time Tony¬ģ Award winner Joe Mantello at Studio 54 on Broadway.

 

PAL JOEY will begin previews on Friday, November 14th, 2008 and open officially Thursday, December 11th, 2008 at Studio 54 on Broadway (254 West 54th Street).  This will be a limited engagement through February 15th, 2009.

 

The design team includes two-time Tony¬ģ Award winner Scott Pask (Sets), five-time Tony¬ģ Award winner William Ivey Long (Costumes), two-time Tony¬ģ Award winner Peggy Eisenhauer and eight-time Tony¬ģ Award winner Jules Fisher (Lights), Tony Meola (Sound), Don Sebesky (Orchestrator) and Eric Stern (Dance Arranger).

 

The production is the first Broadway revival of PAL JOEY in over 30 years. 

 

Set in Chicago in the late 1930s, PAL JOEY is the story of Joey Evans, a brash, scheming song and dance man with dreams of owning his own nightclub.¬†¬† Joey abandons his wholesome girlfriend Linda English, to charm a rich, married older woman, Vera Simpson, in the hope that she’ll set him up in business.¬†

 

In 1939, author John O’Hara approached Richard Rodgers & Lorenz Hart to collaborate on a musical adaptation of his popular “Pal Joey” stories that had originally run in The New Yorker.¬† The musical premiered on Broadway on December 25, 1940, in a production directed and produced by George Abbott, and starring Gene Kelly and Vivienne Segal.¬† While considered a success in 1940, a smash hit 1952 Broadway revival revealed the show as a true landmark Broadway musical, breaking new ground in subject matter, and featuring a score by Rodgers & Hart in their penultimate collaboration.¬† The 1952 production of PAL JOEY won 3 Tony Awards including Best Choreography and the New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award for Best Musical. A film of the musical was made in 1957, starring Frank Sinatra, Rita Hayworth, and Kim Novak.¬† Bob Fosse received a Tony Award nomination for Best Actor in the 1963 production and the 1976 production at Circle in the Square starred Dixie Carter.¬† PAL JOEY was featured in the second season of Encores! at New York City Center in a 1995 concert version starring Patti LuPone and Peter Gallagher.

 

The Rodgers & Hart score for PAL JOEY includes such classic songs as “Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered,” “I Could Write a Book,” “You Mustn’t Kick It Around,” and “Zip,” among others.¬†¬† The new production of PAL JOEY will also feature “I’m Talking to My Pal,” a song that had been dropped from the score during its out-of-town tryout.

 

Stockard Channing won a Tony Award¬ģ for her performance in Roundabout Theatre Company’s Joe Egg in 1985, and also received Tony nominations for her acclaimed performances in The House of Blue Leaves, Six Degrees of Separation, Four Baboons Adoring the Sun and Roundabout Theatre Company’s The Lion in Winter.¬†¬† In 2002, she won two Emmy Awards, one for her role as First Lady Abbey Bartlet in NBC’s “The West Wing” and the other for her performance as Judy Shepard in “The Matthew Shepard Story.” ¬†She was nominated for an Oscar and a Golden Globe when she recreated her role in Six Degrees… ¬†Christian Hoff won a 2006 Tony Award¬ģ for his charismatic portrayal of “Tommy DeVito” in the musical phenomenon, Jersey Boys.¬† He was also an original cast member of The Who’s Tommy.¬† Martha Plimpton is a two-time Tony Award¬ģ nominee for her recent performances in Top Girls & The Coast of Utopia.¬† The leading actors and creative team have a total of 23 Tony Awards¬ģ among them.

 

TICKET INFORMATION & PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE:

Tickets will be available in September 2008, by phone at (212) 719-1300, online at www.roundabouttheatre.org or at the Studio 54 Box Office (254 West 54th Street).  Ticket prices range from $36.50 to $121.50. 

 

Pal Joey will play Tuesday through Saturday evenings at 8:00PM with a Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday matinee at 2:00PM.

 

Through ACCESS Roundabout, 100 tickets will be available for the first preview performance (November 14th) for only $10 each. 

 

Biographies:

 

STOCKARD CHANNING (Vera Simpson) Her extensive theatre credits include Joe Egg (Tony Award, Drama Desk nomination), Hapgood (Drama Desk nomination), Love Letters (original cast), Woman in Mind (Drama Desk Award), The Rink, The Golden Age, They’re Playing Our Song, Little Foxes, and her work in The Lion in Winter, House of Blue Leaves (Drama Desk nomination), Four Baboons Adoring the Sun, and Six Degrees of Separation (Drama Desk nomination) earned her four Tony Award nominations. For Six Degrees… she received an Obie Award and Drama League Award for Performance of the Year as well as an Olivier Award nomination when she performed the play in London. When she recreated her Six Degrees… role for film, she was nominated for an Oscar and a Golden Globe. Other film credits include Bright Young Things, Must Love Dogs, The Business of Strangers (AFI Film Award nomination), Where the Heart Is, Practical Magic, Twilight, The First Wives’ Club, Smoke (SAG nomination), Moll Flanders, Heartburn, Grease (People’s Choice Award), Isn’t She Great? and the upcoming Sparkle, and Multiple Sarcasms.¬† In 2002, Ms. Channing won two Emmy Awards for her roles as First Lady Abby Bartlet on NBC’s “The West Wing,” and for the role of Judy Shepard in “The Matthew Shepard Story,” for which she also received a Screen Actors Guild Award.¬† She received a 2005 Daytime Emmy Award for her role in “Jack”.¬†

 

CHRISTIAN HOFF (Joey Evans) won a Tony Award for his performance as Tommy DeVito in Jersey Boys, whose¬†original Grammy Award winning¬†cast album just went gold.¬†He holds¬†the world record for the most character voices¬†in an¬†audio book and can be heard¬†on television as the voice of American Express and Bank of America. Broadway and national theater credits include The Who’s Tommy, Jesus Christ Superstar, Rocky Horror Show, Lone Star Love, George M!, Will Rogers Follies, Pageant, Camelot and Big River.¬† His screen credits include Encino Man, Star Trek IV, Honor Thy Mother, In Love¬†and¬†War, “Law & Order,” “ER,” “JAG,” “Party of Five,” “Millennium,” “The Comish” and¬†“All My Children.”¬† Christian is¬†the¬†national¬†spokesperson for the Bachmann-Strauss¬†Dystonia and Parkinson Foundation and¬†proud husband and father of three children.

 

MARTHA PLIMPTON (Gladys Bumps) recently received Tony¬†and Drama League nominations for her work in MTC’s acclaimed revival of Top Girls. Other Broadway: Cymbeline, The Coast of Utopia (Drama Desk, Outer Critics awards, Tony nomination), Shining City, 16 Wounded. Off-Broadway: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Hurlyburly, The False Servant, Flesh & Blood, Boston Marriage, Hobson’s Choice (Obie award), suburbia, Pericles. Regional: Uncle Vanya, Sisters Rosensweig, Heidi Chronicles (Seattle Rep), Absolution (dir.), The Glass Menagerie, The Libertine (Steppenwolf), Hedda Gabler, Playboy of the Western World, (Steppenwolf, Long Wharf). Member of Steppenwolf Theater Company ensemble. She has appeared in over 35 films and was nominated for an Emmy award for her appearance on “Law & Order: SVU.”

  

Robert Clohessy (Mike). Theatre: 12 Angry Men (Roundabout Theatre), Frankie and Johnny, A Streetcar Named Desire (Hartford Stage), Rounding Third (John Houseman Theatre), Heaven (Yale Rep), Bad Habits (MTC), Wild Goose (Ensemble Studio Theatre), Golden Boy, The Homecoming, Citizen Tom Paine, Moon Over Miami (Williamstown), The Taming of the Shrew (National Theatre Company), Lucky Lucy and the Fortunate Man (The Writers’ Theatre), Off Shore Wind, (HB Playwrights’ Conference), Hamlet, As You Like It, Midsummer Night’s Dream (500 Theatre Row Ensemble) and many workshop productions with acting teacher and director Walt Witcover at the Masterworks Laboratory Theater. Film: All Good Things, Synecdoche, New York, Across the Universe, Sixteen Blocks, Thought Crimes, Mating Fresno, Signs of the Cross, Strip Search (directed by Sidney Lumet) and The Interpreter (directed by Sidney Pollack), Angels in the Outfield, Assault at West Point, The Deadly Deadline, Married to a Stranger. Television: “Black Donnellys,” “Six Degrees,” “Kidnapped,” “Good Guys, Bad Guys,” series regular on “Hill Street Blues,” “O’Hara,” “Laurie Hill,” “One of the Boys” and “Oz.” Guest starred on 35 other shows and pilots including “The Book of Daniel,” “NYPD Blue,” “High Society,” “Doogie Howser,” “Boy Meets World,” “Jake and the Fat Man,” “The Practice,” “Third Watch,” “St. Elsewhere,” “Law & Order,” “Chicago Hope” and “All My Children.” BFA from SUNY Purchase.

 

Jenny Fellner (Linda English).¬† Broadway: Mamma Mia (Sophie). 1st National Tour: All Shook Up (Natalie/Ed). Off Broadway: Judith Anderson in The Devil’s Disciple for the Irish Repertory Theatre; Crossing Brooklyn and Marcy in the Galaxy, both for The Transport Group. Regional: Paper Mill Playhouse – Little Shop of Horrors (Audrey), Bay St. Theatre – The Boyfriend (Dulcie) directed by Julie Andrews, NSMT – The Three Musketeers (Constance), The O’Neill Musical Theatre Conference and NY Stage & Film – notes to MariAnne (MariAnne), Goodspeed’s Norma Terris Theatre and The 5th Ave. Theatre – Princesses (Miranda). Other NY: “Go the Distance” part of the American Songbook Series at Jazz at Lincoln Center, concert honoring David Zippel at Merkin Concert Hall. TV: “Law & Order: SVU”.

 

Daniel Marcus (Ludlow Lowell). Broadway: The Woman in White, Urinetown, 1776, A Christmas Carol, The Pirates of Penzance, The Who’s Tommy, CATS. Off-Broadway: The Adding Machine, All About Us, The Apple Tree, Urinetown, Carmelina, The Merchant of Venice. Regional: Paint Your Wagon, Guys and Dolls (Pioneer Theatre Company), Gunmetal Blues (George St. Playhouse), A Funny Thing Happened…(Montclair), The Importance of Being Earnest (Milwakee Rep.). TV: “Saturday Night Live,” “The Freshman,” “Another World.”

 

Steven Skybell (Ernest). Broadway: Wicked, The Full Monty, Love! Valour! Compassion!, Cafe Crown, Ah Wilderness. Off-Broadway credits include Controversy of Valladolid, The Lesson, Much Ado About Nothing, What Didn’t Happen, Exact Center of the Universe, The Food Chain, Troilus and Cressida, Henry VI (Public Theatre),¬† Antigone in NY (Obie Award), Dream True (Vineyard Theatre), Richard II (title role), Titus Andronicus (Theatre for a New Audience). Regional/Overseas: Wicked (Chicago), Henry V (Shakespeare’s Globe), Camelot (Helen Hayes nom. Arena Stage), Uncle Vanya (La Jolla/McCarter), Portia Coughlin (McCarter Theatre), Hamlet (California Shakes. Fest.), Hedda Gabler, When We Dead Awaken (American Repertory Theatre), To Whom It May Concern (Williamstown). In 1997 Mr. Skybell was one of two Americans chosen to reopen Shakespeare’s Globe in London, which included a command performance for Queen Elizabeth (“Great Performances”). Film and television: Tom and Francie, Zoo, Cradle Will Rock, Simply Irresistible, Everybody Wins, Liberty!, “Queens Supreme,” “Law and Order,” “Sex and the City,” “Talk to Me,” “New York News,” “All My Children,” “As the World Turns.” B.A. in Theatre, Yale College, British American Drama Academy, MFA from Yale School of Drama.

 

Timothy J. Alex (Ensemble). Broadway: Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, Never Gonna Dance, Chicago, Thou Shalt Not, Sweet Smell of Success, Man of La Mancha, Titanic. Off Broadway: Stairway to Paradise, Pardon My English. Pre-Broadway workshops: Ragtime, Fosse, Cats, Sunset Boulevard, Joseph…Dreamcoat, Crazy for You. Regional: Kiss Me, Kate, Pirates!, Ragtime, Sunset Boulevard, Crazy For You, Pippin, Joseph…Dreamcoat. TV/Commercials: “All My Children,” “Grand Theft Auto IV” video game.

 

Brian Barry (Ensemble). Broadway/Tour: Radio City Christmas Spectacular, Cats. Regional: White Christmas (Denver Center for PA), Hello, Dolly!, Tommy (Pittsburgh Civic Light Opera), West Side Story (Pioneer Theatre Company), The New Red, Hot and Blue! (Paper Mill Playhouse, Goodspeed Opera House), Footloose (Northshore Music Theatre), Kiss Me, Kate (Houston TUTS), Brigadoon, Bells Are Ringing ( PCLO), Sweet Charity (Arvada Center). Workshop: Carnivale (Radio City Music Hall).

 

Bahiyah Sayyed Gaines (Ensemble).¬† Bahiyah credits her success to acclaimed companies such as Alvin Ailey, Frankfurt Ballet and Creative Outlet Dance Theater of Brooklyn which allowed her a smooth transition into the Broadway scene. She’s an original Broadway member of The Color Purple, The Little Mermaid and is delighted to be joining the cast of Pal Joey.

 

Lisa Gajda (Ensemble).¬† Broadway: Cry Baby, The Times They Are a Changin’, Spamalot; Movin’ Out; Taboo; Urban Cowboy; Sweet Smell of Success; Kiss Me, Kate; Fosse; How to Succeed…; Tommy. Other NY stage: Can-Can for Encores!, Radio City’s Christmas and Easter shows. TV: “Fashion Rocks”, “Viva Variety,” “Academy Awards,” “MTV Music Awards.”

                                                                                               

Anthony Holds (Ensemble). Broadway: Spamalot,¬†Dracula. ¬†Recently played¬†Sir Dennis Galahad on the first national tour of¬†Monty Python’s Spamalot.¬†Off-Broadway: The Great American Trailer Park Musical, Steve Jobs in Nerds at the 2005 New York Musical Theatre Festival. Regional highlights: The Full Monty (Jerry), The Last Five Years (Jamie) and Titanic (Andrews). TV: “Law & Order.” Former naval officer and graduate of Annapolis.

 

Nadine Isenegger (Val).¬† Broadway: A Chorus Line (Lois, Cassie US), 42nd Street (Peggy Sawyer); Kiss Me, Kate; Follies; Cats (Victoria). Tours/regional: 42nd Street (Peggy Sawyer), Titanic, Fame (Iris), White Christmas (Judy), The Studio (Lisa). Film/TV: Sweet and Lowdown, Deconstructing Harry, “AMC,” “AW,” “GL.” Numerous commercials.

 

Mark Morettini (Ensemble). Theatre roles include Twelve Angry Men (National Tour, Roundabout Theatre Company), Bleacher Bums, Lost in Yonkers (Royal George Theatre), London Suite, Laughter on the 23rd Floor (Briar Street Theatre), Lend Me a Tenor (Apollo Theatre, Cherry County Playhouse), An Affair of State (The Set), Incorruptible, Wild Honey, Animal Farm (Bailiwick Repertory), Little Shop of Horrors (Music Theatre North). Film: Let’s Go to Prison, Road to Perdition, US Marshall, Chain Reaction, Home Alone II. TV: “Prison Break,” “Early Edition,” “E.R.,” “The Untouchables,” “Two Fathers: Justice for the Innocent,” “Mario and the Mob.” Over 300 commercials, voiceovers and industrials. B.A. in Theatre Performance from Rhode Island College.

 

Kathryn Mowat Murphy ¬†(Ensemble).¬† Broadway: Fosse, National Tours Chicago, Fosse, Sweet Charity. A Chorus Line.¬†Regional: Cassie in A Chorus Line in theaters across the Country. New York: Plane Crazy (NYMF), W(hole) (33rd Annual Samuel French Off-Off Broadway Short Play Festival). TV: “Saturday Night Live”, “iCarly” (Nickelodeon).

 

Abbey O’Brien (Swing). Favorite credits: Original cast member-Spamalot (Broadway), No Strings (Encores!), NYC Rockettes, Sinatra (Radio City), Will Rogers Follies (Music Circus), Carnivale (Radio City), A Chorus Line (Helen Hayes). ¬†

 

Hayley Podschun (Ensemble). Broadway/First National Tour credits: Sunday in the Park with George at the Roundabout, Hairspray (Tammy u/s Penny, Amber), The Sound of Music (Standby for Louisa/Brigitta).  Film: Hairspray (Tammy).

 

Matthew Risch (Ensemble) is happy to be switching gears after coming from the original company of Legally Blonde (Carlos, Warner u/s) Other Broadway: Chicago (Sgt. Fogarty, Fred Casely u/s).¬† TV: “Lipstick Jungle”.¬† Attended Walnut Hill School and CCM.¬†

 

Krista Saab (Ensemble).  Krista is thrilled to be making her Broadway debut in Pal Joey!  NY Theatre: Camelot with the NY Philharmonic (Lincoln Center), Radio City Rockette.  Tours/Regional Theatre:  Carnival!  (Kennedy Center) Crazy For You (CLOSBC), 42nd St.  TV/Film:  American Gangster, The Great Observer, The Ellen Degeneres Show, PBS Live at Lincoln Center, A Capitol Fourth, Macys Thanksgiving Day Parade. 

 

Eric Sciotto (Swing). BFA in Musical Theatre from Cincinnati College Conservatory of Music, roles there included Emcee (Cabaret), Giorgio (Passion) and Will Parker (Oklahoma!). Broadway credits: Cry-Baby, Sweet Charity, Annie Get Your Gun, Aida, 42nd Street, Sweet Smell of Success. National Tours: Annie Get Your Gun, A Chorus Line. Regional: The Pirates of Penzance (St. Michael’s Playhouse), Aida (Westchester Broadway), Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (Godspeed), West Side Story, A Chorus Line (North Carolina Theatre), …World Goes ‚ÄėRound, Something’s Afoot (Hot Summer Nights), Brigadoon, Bells are Ringing (Pittsburgh CLO), Meet Me in St. Louis (Santa Barbara CLO), Chicago (Ogunquit Playhouse), Crazy for You, The Most Happy Fella (Music Theatre of Wichita).

 

RICHARD RODGERS (Music; 1902-1979) and LORENZ HART (Lyrics; 1895-1943) wrote their first shows together when both were still students attending Columbia University. Their breakthrough came with the score for a 1925 charity show, The Garrick Gaities, which introduced the classic valentine to their hometown, “Manhattan.” Over the next five years they wrote fifteen musical comedies for Broadway and London’s West End before relocating to Hollywood in 1930, where they contributed songs and wrote the scores for several movie musicals, most notably Love Me Tonight starring Maurice Chevalier. In 1935 they returned to New York to write the score for Billy Rose’s circus musical Jumbo, launching a golden era that included On Your Toes, Babes In Arms, I’d Rather Be Right, I Married An Angel, The Boys From Syracuse, Too Many Girls, Higher And Higher, Pal Joey and By Jupiter, which collectively offered such classic songs as “There’s a Small Hotel,” “I Wish I Were In Love Again,” “My Funny Valentine,” “Where Or When,” “The Lady is a Tramp,” “Spring Is Here,” “Falling In Love With Love,” “Sing For Your Supper,” “This Can’t Be Love,” “I Didn’t Know What Time It Was,” “It Never Entered My Mind,” “Bewitched,” “I Could Write a Book,” “Nobody’s Heart,” and “Wait Till You See Her.” In 1943 the partnership disbanded temporarily when Rodgers collaborated with Oscar Hammerstein II on Oklahoma!, but it resumed with a revision of the 1927 Rodgers & Hart hit A Connecticut Yankee, which opened less than a week before Lorenz Hart’s death. For the next two decades, Richard Rodgers collaborated exclusively with Oscar Hammerstein II on such musicals as Carousel, South Pacific, The King And I, and The Sound Of Music, winning Tonys, Oscars, Grammys, Emmys and Pulitzer Prizes.¬† After Hammerstein’s death in 1960, Rodgers continued to write for the musical stage; his fortieth, and final, Broadway musical opened less than eight months before his death in 1979.

 

RICHARD GREENBERG (New Book) is the author of Take Me Out (Drama Desk Award; NY Drama Critics Circle Award; Outer Critics Circle Award; Lucille Lortel Award; Tony Award for Best Play), which received an acclaimed production on Broadway after successful runs at The Donmar on London’s West End and The Public Theater in New York City.¬† Other works include A Naked Girl on the Appian Way at Roundabout, The Violet Hour,The Dazzle at Roundabout (Outer Critics Circle Award: John Gassner, Lucille Lortel nominations), Everett Beekin, Three Days of Rain (L.A. Drama Critics Award; Pulitzer finalist; Olivier, Drama Desk, Hull-Warriner nominations), Hurrah At Last, Night and Her Stars, The American Plan, Life Under Water, and The Author’s Voice, among many other plays.¬† His adaptation of Strindberg’s Dance of Death was seen on Broadway starring Ian McKellen, Helen Mirren, and David Straithairn.¬† Mr.Greenberg received the Oppenheimer Award for a new playwright as well as the first PEN/Laura Pels Award for a playwright in mid-career.¬† He is an associate artist at South Coast Repertory and a member of Ensemble Studio Theater.

 

JOHN O’HARA (Original Book), American novelist and short story writer (1905-1970), was born into an Irish Catholic family in Pottsville, Pennsylvania. He began to write fiction in 1927; his first novel, Appointment in Samarra (1934), won popular acclaim and established O’Hara as a craftsman of prose. Over the following years, O’Hara explored his interest in the effects of money, class and social mores on individual freedom in many widely praised works, including Butterfield 8 (1935; film version, 1960) and From the Terrace (1958; film version, 1960). In 1956 he received the National Book Award for Ten North Frederick (1955; film version, 1958). O’Hara’s works also include many short stories, most published by The New Yorker and the late novels Ourselves to Know (1960) and The Lockwood Concern (1965). He collaborated with the team of Rodgers & Hart, writing the book for the musical Pal Joey based on his short stories.

 

JOE MANTELLO (Director).¬† Directing credits include November, The Receptionist, The Ritz (Roundabout), Three Days of Rain, The Odd Couple, Glengarry Glen Ross (Tony nomination), Laugh Whore, Assassins (Roundabout; Tony Award), Wicked, Take Me Out (Tony Award), Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune, A Man of No Importance, Design for Living (Roundabout), Terrence McNally and Jake Heggie’s Dead Man Walking for the San Francisco Opera, The Vagina Monologues, bash, Another American: Asking and Telling, Love! Valour! Compassion! (Tony nomination), Proposals, The Mineola Twins, Corpus Christi, Mizlansky/Zilinsky or Schmucks, Blue Window, God’s Heart, The Santaland Diaries, Snakebit, Three Hotels and Imagining Brad. Mr. Mantello also directed the film Love! Valour! Compassion! As an actor he appeared in Angels in America (Tony nomination) and The Baltimore Waltz. Mr. Mantello is the recipient of Outer Critics Circle, Drama Desk, Lucille Lortel, Helen Hayes, Clarence Derwent, Obie and Joe A. Callaway awards. He is a member of Naked Angels and an associate artist at the Roundabout.

 

GRACIELA DANIELE (Choreographer).¬† Broadway (Director/Choreographer): Chita Rivera: The Dancer’s Life, Annie Get Your Gun, Marie Christine, Once on This Island, Chronicle of a Death Foretold and Dangerous Game.¬† Musical Staging/Choreography includes: Ragtime (Astaire, Ovation, NAACP, and Callaway Awards), The Goodbye Girl, Zorba with Anthony Quinn, The Rink starring Liza Minnelli and Chita Rivera, The Mystery of Edwin Drood and The Pirate Queen. Choreography: The Pirates of Penzance (NYSF) on Broadway, Los Angeles, and London.¬† Film: Pirates, and Woody Allen’s Mighty Aphrodite (1996 Fosse Award) and Everyone Say I Love You (1997 Fosse Award).¬† Lincoln Center Theater (Resident Director): Directed and Choreographed William Finn’s A New Brain and Elegies, Michael John LaChiusa’s Hello Again and Bernarda Alba, and Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty’s Dessa Rose and The Glorious Ones.¬† Mr. Abbott Award (1998) for Outstanding Achievement by a Director/Choreographer, ten Tony nominations, six Drama Desk nominations and inducted into the Theatre Hall of Fame.

 

PAUL GEMIGNANI (Music Director).¬† Musical Director for more than 38 Broadway shows, including: 110 in the Shade, Follies, Pacific Overtures, Candide, A Little Night Music, Sweeney Todd, Evita, Dreamgirls, Merrily We Roll Along, Into the Woods, On the Twentieth Century, Sunday…George, High Society, Kiss Me Kate, Assassins, Frogs. Conducted: Follies (Philharmonic), A Little Night Music (PBS), A Celebration of the American Musical (Great Performances). ¬†Showtime: Into the Woods, Sunday in the Park with George and Passion. Films include: Kramer vs. Kramer, Reds, Eyewitness, and Sweeney Todd. Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement, Special Drama Desk and Los Angeles Drama Critics Awards for Outstanding Musical Direction and Commitment to the Theatre, Emmy for “South Pacific at Carnegie Hall”, and an honorary Doctor of Musical Arts from the Manhattan School of Music. Grammy nominations for Passion, Crazy for You and Kiss Me Kate.

 

MARC PLATT (Producer).¬† Theatre:¬† Wicked (Broadway, Chicago, North American tour, London, Los Angeles, Melbourne); Three Days of Rain (Broadway); and Matthew Bourne’s ballet Edward Scissorhands.¬†¬† Films: ¬†Wanted starring Angelina Jolie, James McAvoy, and Morgan Freeman;¬† Legally Blonde; Legally Blonde 2; Honey; Josie and the Pussycats; The Perfect Man; The Seeker.¬† Upcoming Projects:¬† Rachel Getting Married which reunites Mr. Platt with Oscar-winning director Jonathan Demme on a film starring Anne Hathaway and Debra Winger; and Scott Pilgrim vs. The World being directed by Edgar Wright, starring Michael Cera.¬† He is currently in pre-production on the film Nine with Rob Marshall directing.¬† Television:¬† HBO’s Empire Falls (Golden Globe Award); Once Upon A Mattress (ABC); The Path To 9/11 (ABC).¬†¬† Mr. Platt has served as president for three movie studios (Orion, TriStar and Universal) where he developed and guided the production of such films as Silence of the Lambs; Sleepless In Seattle; Philadelphia; As Good As It Gets; My Best Friend’s Wedding and Jerry Maguire.

 

ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY is one of the country’s leading not-for-profit theatres.¬† The company contributes invaluably to New York’s cultural life by staging the highest quality revivals of classic plays and musicals as well as new plays by established writers. Roundabout consistently partners great artists with great works to bring a fresh and exciting interpretation that makes each production relevant and important to today’s audiences.

 

Roundabout Theatre Company currently produces at three permanent homes each of which is designed specifically to enhance the needs of the Roundabout’s mission.¬†¬†Off-Broadway, the Harold and Miriam Steinberg Center for Theatre, which houses the Laura Pels Theatre and Black Box Theatre, with its simple sophisticated design is perfectly suited to showcasing new plays. The grandeur of its Broadway home on 42nd Street, American Airlines Theatre, sets the ideal stage for the classics.¬†¬†Roundabout’s¬†Studio 54 provides an exciting and intimate Broadway venue for its¬†musical and special event productions.¬† Together these three distinctive venues serve to enhance¬†the work on each of its stages.

 

Lead support provided by Roundabout’s Musical Theatre Production Fund partners:¬† Perry and Marty Granoff,¬†The Kaplen Foundation, Peter and Leni May, John and Gilda McGarry, Tom and Diane Tuft.¬†¬† Major support provided by The Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation.

 

Roundabout Theatre Company productions are made possible, in part, with public funds from the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation; New York State Council on the Arts; National Endowment for the Arts; and New York City Department of Cultural Affairs. American Express is the 2008-2009 season sponsor of the Roundabout Theatre Company.  American Airlines is the official airline of Roundabout Theatre Company.  The Westin New York is the official hotel of Roundabout Theatre Company.   

 

Roundabout Theatre Company is currently presenting Christopher Durang’s The Marriage of Bette & Boo, directed by Walter Bobbie at the Laura Pels Theatre at the Harold and Miriam Steinberg Center for Theatre. Roundabout’s sold out production of The 39 Steps transferred to the Cort Theatre on April 29th, 2008.

 

Roundabout Theatre Company‘s upcoming 2008-2009 season will also include Robert Bolt’s A Man for All Seasons, starring Frank Langella, directed by Doug Hughes; Bob Fosse’s Dancin’; David Rabe’s Streamers, directed by Scott Ellis, Lisa Loomer’s Distracted featuring Cynthia Nixon, directed by Mark Brokaw and Steven Levenson’s The Language of Trees, directed by Alex Timbers.

 

Roundabout Theatre Company’s critically acclaimed Broadway production of Reginald Rose’s Twelve Angry Men is currently booking the third year of its multi-award winning tour.¬† Twelve Angry Men is directed by Tony-nominated director Scott Ellis (Curtains).

 

www.roundabouttheatre.org

 

 

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