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BROADWAY’S MARY STUART IN THE NEWS

BROADWAY’S MARY STUART

IN THE NEWS

 

The Donmar Warehouse production of Friedrich Schiller’s MARY STUART, in a new version by Peter Oswald and directed by Phyllida Lloyd, opened on Sunday, April 19 at the Broadhurst Theatre.  The production stars Janet McTeer as Mary, Queen of Scots and Harriet Walter as Queen Elizabeth I.  The production, which received rave reviews from critics yesterday, has also been making headlines. 

 

Here are some recent stories about the production:

 

New York Times

Battling Divas of History: It’s Acting Folks

By Patrick Healy

Sunday, April 19

 

As Elizabeth I might have said, let us dispense forthwith on the matter of catfights. While Elizabeth and her cousin Mary Stuart are in bloody battle on Broadway this spring in Friedrich Schiller’s “Mary Stuart,” are the actresses in those roles – Harriet Walter and Janet McTeer – actually getting along?

 

It’s hard to tell from an orchestra seat at the Broadhurst Theater, given how viciously the women rip into each other over three hours of re-enacting one of the most famous family feuds in royal history. “Mary Stuart,” which opens Sunday, is one of the relatively rare plays that offer two equally powerhouse roles for actresses, and Elizabeth’s and Mary’s competing desire for attention – from male courtiers, from England, from each other – has many theatergoers assuming that the rivalry must spill over offstage.

 

During a recent visit with these two British veterans of the London stage, it did not escape notice that the dressing room of Ms. McTeer, whose Mary, Queen of Scots, is the heroine of the play, was on the ground floor of the Broadhurst while Ms. Walter’s was one floor below. Yet from the first words of the interview, the bravura onstage hostilities slipped out of mind.

 

“If you’re lucky enough to be offered lovely leading roles, you very rarely get to work with actresses you put on pedestals because you’re usually in competition for the same role,” Ms. McTeer said. “But this was a chance to work with Hattie. I’ve loved her forever; she’s always on a bit of a pedestal.”

 

“Not anymore,” Ms. Walter replied playfully, a wink to the way Mary, in the play and in history, takes on Elizabeth.

 

 

NYTimes.com

A Queen’s Rain

Audio slide show produced by Erik Piepenburg

 

A backstage look at the mechanics of the simulated storm in the play “Mary Stuart.”

 

 

Bergen Record

Story of the ultimate family conflict returns to Broadway

By Robert Feldberg

Sunday, April 19

 

“What are the chances of a 209-year-old German play making it on Broadway?

 

With “Mary Stuart,” you’d have to say it has a shot.

 

Friedrich Schiller’s historical drama, about the battle of wills between England’s Elizabeth I and Mary, Queen of Scots against a backdrop of court intrigue, has been revived on Broadway before over the centuries – including a repertory engagement in 1900 – but none of the runs lasted very long.

 

This production, however, arrives bearing glowing reviews and success in London, as well as its two acclaimed British stars, Janet McTeer (Mary) and Harriet Walter (Elizabeth).

 

During a recent joint interview in McTeer’s dressing room at the Broadhurst Theatre, where the play opens today, Walter said she believes one reason for the play’s appeal is its contemporary resonance.

 

“There are endless references to the country’s security,” she said. “It was paramount. Because of fear, people sacrificed their integrity and their liberality.”

 

 

 

Wall Street Journal

From ‘Mamma’ to Mary

After a global box-office smash, a director returns to the stage

By Ellen Gamerman

Friday, April 17

 

“Mary Stuart,” a nearly three-hour drama about the rivalry between Elizabeth I and Mary Queen of Scots written by a German playwright more than 200 years ago, does not sound like the most likely follow-up project for the director of the Broadway musical and movie megahit, “Mamma Mia!”

 

But Phyllida Lloyd, whose 2008 summer blockbuster based around music from the Swedish pop group ABBA became the highest-grossing movie worldwide by a female director, is returning to the classical work that she says defines her. “Mary Stuart” opens Sunday at the Broadhurst Theatre in New York.

 

“To me, the standards and the vision and the ambition for ‘Mamma Mia!’ are exactly the same” as for “Mary Stuart,” Ms. Lloyd says. “The goals are the same: to create something that will make a difference.”

 

 

Broadway.com

Q&A with Janet McTeer

By Kathy Henderson

 

One of the many arresting images in the current Broadway production of Mary Stuart is Janet McTeer (as the title character, Mary Queen of Scots) standing center-stage surrounded by six men in modern-day business suits. Although she’s a prisoner, garbed in a plain period dress, and they are royal courtiers, McTeer’s Mary is by far the most powerful person on the stage. “Regal” doesn’t begin to describe the 6′ 1″ British actress, known to Broadway audiences for her Tony Award-winning performance as Nora in the 1997 revival of Ibsen’s A Doll’s House. Since then, McTeer has nabbed a Best Actress Oscar nomination (for Tumbleweeds, in which she assumed a spot-on Southern accent) and continued winning raves on the London stage for productions ranging from God of Carnage (in the role Marcia Gay Harden is playing on Broadway) to an all-female Taming of the Shrew (as Petruchio). Chatting during previews in her stage-side dressing room at the Broadhurst Theatre, the 47-year-old actress brushed away talk of theatrical awards and spoke generously about the other Broadway shows she’s been devouring since arriving in New York.

What’s it like to do Mary Stuart on Broadway four years after your London run?
It’s going incredibly well. I don’t think I’ve ever worked with a cast that is (a) so good and (b) so gorgeous [laughs]. We’ve got new people and new relationships, so it’s a completely different experience.

Elizabeth is a bigger part than Mary. Why did you choose to play the title role?
Two reasons really. They’re both sensational parts, but I thought, “In 10 years’ time I’ll be too old to play Mary, so I might as well do it now.” Also, if you’re lucky enough to be a leading actress, you hardly ever get to work with other actresses you admire. Either you’re playing the Duchess of Malfi or they are. So this was a chance, if I played Mary, to get to work with Harriet [Walter as Elizabeth], one of the actresses I had looked up to for a very long time.

What’s the appeal of Mary Stuart for a modern audience?
It’s more than a historical drama, it’s a mammoth, tense thriller about the politics of being in prison, who’s going to do what to whom, and whether Mary can free herself. Instead of pulling out the differences between Elizabeth and Mary in this production, we’ve tried to pull out the similarities. I start out in short hair and a black frock, and Elizabeth ends up in short hair and a black frock. She starts out glamorous and I end up glamorous-the idea being that although I lose the political power struggle and she wins, personally speaking, I win and she loses. Even though it’s a classical play, it’s very exciting and very modern.

 

 

Playbill

Queen to Queen: Reinventing Schiller’s Mary Stuart

By Ruth Leon

April issue       

Mary Stuart, Friedrich Schiller’s 1800 drama about England’s Queen Elizabeth I and Mary, Queen of Scots confounds all those complaints about there being no roles for actresses “of a certain age” (read: over 25). This recent transfer from London’s West End, currently playing at the Broadhurst Theatre, provides two.

They are inhabited by two of Britain’s favorite stage actors, neither of whom seems to have any problem finding suitable roles on either side of the Atlantic: Harriet Walter (Elizabeth) was last on Broadway with the Royal Shakespeare Company’s wildly successful All’s Well That Ends Well in 1983 and received the Evening Standard Best Actress Award in 2005 for this performance in Mary Stuart, and Janet McTeer (Mary) won a Tony Award in 1997 as Best Actress for her Nora in Ibsen’s A Doll’s House. Both are, by any measure, the real thing, experienced and much-loved performers at the top of their game, and thrilled to be back in New York with a fine supporting cast of American actors in a great play.

 

The Huffington Post

Making Torture Lawful

By Allison Silver

Tuesday, April 21

 

“The argument is being played out in front of us.

 

Dark deeds were done at the leader’s behest, to achieve desirable, even honorable, goals. The nation’s security and stability depend on this, and terrorism and national upheaval averted. So, though unlawful, it all seems necessary. The leader clearly wants it — and is asking agents to do it. Accepting public responsibility, however, is another matter.

 

But this is not about torture and the Bush administration’s use of “enhanced” interrogation methods that were outside of U.S. law and the Geneva Conventions. This is not about the wide array of unlawful actions that the Bush team asserted were vital to save the United States from another Al Qaeda attack.

 

Instead, this is a play, Mary Stuart, written in 1800 by Friedrich Schiller, the German playwright and poet. This riveting drama, which just opened on Broadway to glowing reviews presents a powerful tale: Queen Elizabeth I clearly wants her cousin, Mary Stuart killed, but doesn’t want to be held responsible. She wants it done — without having her fingerprints on it.”

 

 

Opening Night Coverage

Playbill On Opening Night

Broadway.com Opening Night Video Feature

Broadway.com Opening Night Photo Op

Broadway.TV Opening Night Video Feature

BroadwayWorld.com Photo Coverage

TheaterMania Opening Night Photo Coverage

 

 

Tickets for MARY STUART are available through Telecharge at 212-239-6200, through www.telecharge,com or at the Broadhurst Theatre box office (235 West 44th Street).  The production plays a limited run through Sunday, August 16.

 

 

# # # #

 

www.MaryStuartOnBroadway.com

2008-2009 DRAMA LEAGUE AWARD NOMINATIONS

2008-2009 DRAMA LEAGUE AWARD NOMINATIONS

 

Nominations for the 75th annual Drama League Awards, celebrating excellence in Broadway and Off-Broadway theatre, were announced this morning.

 

 

33 VARIATIONS has been nominated for Distinguished Production of a Play (Moisés Kaufman) and Distinguished Performance Award (Jane Fonda).

 

 

ACCENT ON YOUTH has been nominated for a Distinguished Performance Award (David Hyde Pierce).

 

 

ALL MY SONS has been nominated for a Distinguished Performance Award (Patrick Wilson), as well as an honor for previous Distinguished Performance Award winner John Lithgow.

 

 

THE CRIPPLE OF INISHMAAN has been nominated Distinguished Revival of a Play (Garry Hynes) and Distinguished Performance Award (David Pearse).

 

 

DISTRACTED has been nominated for Distinguished Performance Award (Cynthia Nixon).

 

 

EXIT THE KING has been nominated for Distinguished Revival of a Play and two Distinguished Performance Awards  (Geoffrey Rush and Susan Sarandon).

 

 

GOD OF CARNAGE has been nominated for Distinguished Production of a Play and two nominations for the Distinguished Performance Award (Marcia Gay Harden and James Gandolfini).

 

 

MARY STUART has been nominated Distinguished Revival of a Play and two Distinguished Performance Awards (Janet McTeer, Harriet Walter).

 

 

THE NORMAN CONQUESTS has been nominated for Distinguished Revival of a Play and Distinguished Performance Award (Ben Miles).

 

 

PAL JOEY has been nominated for Distinguished Revival of a Musical and Distinguished Performance Award (Martha Plimpton).

 

 

RUINED has been nominated for Distinguished Production of a Play (Lynn Nottage) and Distinguished Performance Award (Saidah Arrika Ekulona).

 

 

THE SEAGULL has been nominated for Distinguished Revival of a Play and Distinguished Performance Award (Kristin Scott Thomas).  

 

 

SHREK THE MUSICAL has been nominated for Distinguished Production of a Musical and two Distinguished Performance  Awards (Sutton Foster , Christopher Sieber).

 

 

WAITING FOR GODOT has been nominated for two Distinguished Performance Awards  (John Glover , Bill Irwin).

 

 

Not for profit company nominations:

 

ATLANTIC THEATER COMPANY has been honored with two nominations for THE CRIPPLE OF INISHMAAN.

 

 

MANHATAN THEATRE CLUB productions have been honored with three nominations including two for RUINED and one for ACCENT ON YOUTH.

 

 

ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY productions have been honored with five nominations including two for WAITING FOR GODOT, two for PAL JOEY and onefor DISTRACTED. In addition past recipients of the Distinguished Performance Award will be honored on the dais for their work this season which includes: Stockard Channing (PAL JOEY), Frank Langella (A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS) and Mary-Louise Parker (HEDDA GABLER). 

 

 

 TO READ THE COMPLETE LIST OF NOMINEES, VISIT: http://tinyurl.com/c7f89a

CRITICS LOSE THEIR HEADS OVER MARY STUART

CRITICS LOSE THEIR HEADS OVER

JANET McTEER AND HARRIET WALTER IN
MARY STUART

THE DONMAR WAREHOUSE PRODUCTION OF THE CLASSIC

FRIEDRICH SCHILLER PLAY, IN A NEW VERSION BY PETER OSWALD

AND DIRECTED BY PHYLLIDA LLOYD, OPENS TO RAVES

The Donmar Warehouse Production of Friedrich Schiller’s MARY STUART, in a new version by Peter Oswald and directed by Phyllida Lloyd and starring Janet McTeer and Harriet Walter, opened last night on Broadway at the Broadhurst Theatre.   

Here are the links to the reviews of the production: 

Ben Brantley, New York Times

http://theater2.nytimes.com/2009/04/20/theater/reviews/20mary.html?ref=arts

“You can argue all you like, as historians and theologians have for centuries, about which of them has the greater claim to the English throne. But after seeing the terrifically exciting new production of Friedrich Schiller’s “Mary Stuart,” which opened Sunday night at the Broadhurst Theater, you won’t doubt that both the queens it portrays are born to rule. So, I might add, are the actresses who play them.

That would be Janet McTeer, as Mary Queen of Scots, and Harriet Walter, as Elizabeth I. And they embody what may be the most storied rivalry in English history with a transfixing willfulness and devious artistry that could easily make the susceptible lose their heads. This being the year of our Lord 2009, no such sacrifices will be demanded literally. But it’s hard not to be at least a little in love with – and more than a little in awe of – the very leading ladies in Phyllida Lloyd’s crackling revival (first seen at the Donmar Warehouse in London) of this 1800 tragedy of double-dealing politics.

The classical combination of strengths, weakness and circumstance that define tragic heroes has seldom been parsed with such flash, vigor and lacerating insight.”

Elisabeth Vincentelli, New York Post

http://www.nypost.com/seven/04202009/entertainment/theater/queens_for_any_day_165301.htm

“Spring has brought plenty of hyped shows and stars to Broadway. But don’t let those high- wattage marquees blind you to this sleeper, which delivers plenty more thrills than most of its neighbors.

A London import as gripping as it is elegant, “Mary Stuart” is packed with political machinations, mind games and rhetorical bouts about justice and power. Think of it as “Frost/Nixon” with women, beheadings and ruffs.

Joe Dziemianowicz, Daily News

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/arts/2009/04/20/2009-04-20_a_family_battle_royal_in_mary_stuart.html

“What to do about that pesky cousin? Behead her? Have her killed? Let her rot in jail?

Those questions face Elizabeth I in “Mary Stuart,” now on Broadway in a bold revival from London’s Donmar Warehouse. Friedrich Schiller’s drama, adapted by Peter Oswald, depicts shifting loyalties by all the queens’ men, but this slice of history is all about the leading ladies.

With Tony winner Janet ­McTeer (“A Doll’s House”) as Mary and Harriet Walter as Elizabeth, who signed her rival’s death warrant, there’s a pair of powerhouses on the thrones of Scotland and England.”

Linda Winer, Newsday

http://www.newsday.com/entertainment/stage/ny-etstu2012670671apr18,0,4181778.story

“Just when you think you’re catching up with this speedway of a Broadway spring season, along comes a real stunner to move the finish line again. How thrilling.

“Mary Stuart,” which opened last night in a production from London’s Donmar Warehouse, is a riveting showcase for Janet McTeer and Harriet Walter – two towering actresses in a monumentally entertaining regina smackdown.

But this is more than just a star vehicle about the deadly collision of the Protestant Elizabeth I and Mary, the Catholic Queen of Scotland. Phyllida Lloyd, the director known here only for “Mamma, Mia!,” has staged Peter Oswald’s taut three-hour compression of Friedrich Schiller’s massive 1800 drama with all the visceral, unpredictable psychology of a popular page-turner.”

Mike Kuchwara, Associated Press

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2009/04/19/entertainment/e160010D25.DTL

“It’s quite a faceoff.

“Mary Stuart” superbly explores the link between Elizabeth I and Mary, Queen of Scots, royal relatives locked in a grim battle that only one can win. But what elevates this adaptation of Friedrich Schiller’s venerable play to even greater heights are the thrilling performances of the actresses who portray these formidable ladies: Janet McTeer as Mary and Harriet Walter as Elizabeth.

The suspense is palpable despite the fact we know how the play will end. Credit director Phyllida Lloyd and adapter Peter Oswald, who have created a taut tale of political intrigue, a bruising contest in which the prize is England itself.

The men have been particularly well cast, creating credible, individualistic performances in roles that could become a blur. Among the more memorable portraits are Brian Murray’s commonsense Shrewsbury, a man infused with a generosity of spirit, and John Benjamin Hickey as Shrewsbury’s polar opposite, the duplicitous, calculating Leicester. An intense Chandler Williams also scores as Mortimer, an ardent young supporter of Mary.

But the women are the main focus here, and when the two queens finally meet in Act 2 after an artfully prolonged build-up, the fireworks are more than royal. Call them electrifying, lifting this version of “Mary Stuart” into the realm of high-powered, classic drama.”

David Rooney, Variety

http://www.variety.com/VE1117940074.html

“Phyllida Lloyd’s steely revival of the Friedrich Schiller play simmers and scalds as it should, but it’s the deft balance of the parallel tragedies of two imprisoned queens that makes the production so enthralling. . . .

 Just as Christopher Hampton did with “The Seagull” earlier this season, Peter Oswald’s new version vigorously shakes the dust off the Schiller text. This is no stodgy history lesson but a juicy regal smackdown rendered in direct, muscular language .

This is a superbly focused production that permits no distractions from the antithetical arcs of its heroines, or the political machinations that shape their tragedies.”

Robert Feldberg, Bergen Record

http://www.northjersey.com/entertainment/stage/43262762.html?page=all

“The revival of Friedrich Schiller’s 1800 play “Mary Stuart” is vibrant, audacious and, as the plots are hatched that will send Mary to the gallows, improbably funny. This alchemy is the result of a charged and witty adaptation by Peter Oswald, imaginative direction by Phyllida Lloyd and glorious performances by Janet McTeer (Mary) and Harriet Walter (Elizabeth).”

John Simon, Bloomberg News

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601088&sid=acVEPFlholUw&refer=muse

“The acting is properly timeless.  Janet McTeer is a thoroughly believable Mary: handsome, beautifully spoken, and almost acrobatically agile. Harriet Walter’s Elizabeth shuttles provocatively between starchiness and giddiness, grandeur and ultimate forlornness

And let us not overlook the unscripted rain — the wettest and most real ever staged — to make you fear for the drenched actors’ health. Above all, it is nice to see — whatever kept England and Scotland apart — the English and American theaters so seamlessly blended.”

Frank Scheck, Hollywood Reporter

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/hr/film-reviews/theater-review-mary-stuart-1003964062.story

“Friedrich von Schiller’s 1800 historical drama of royal intrigue comes to blazing life in director Phyllida Lloyd’s staging, imported to Broadway after hugely acclaimed stints at London’s Donmar Warehouse and on the West End. Starring Janet McTeer and Harriet Walter, both making far-too-belated returns to the New York stage, “Mary Stuart” looks to be the prestige hit of the spring season.

Walter and McTeer deliver superbly riveting performances. The former is all tight control, gradually peeling away Elizabeth’s formidable reserve to display the deep anguish caused by her immense responsibilities, and the latter provides an emotive, vigorous turn that emphasizes Mary’s passion, both physical and emotional.

The male players, newly cast for this American production, provide sterling support, with particularly vivid turns by John Benjamin Hickey as the scheming Leicester, Brian Murray as the sympathetic Shrewsbury and Nicholas Woodeson as the calculating Lord Burleigh.”

David Cote, Time Out New York

http://newyork.timeout.com/articles/theater/73697/mary-stuart-at-broadhurst-theatre-theater-review

“Five Stars!  This is a juicy historical drama about two glamorous divas going at it hammer and tongs.  Director Phyllida Lloyd Lloyd and her sublime leading ladies ensure that our sympathies keep ping-ponging until the very end. When I caught the original, more intimate staging at London’s Donmar Warehouse in 2005, the action felt weighted toward beleaguered, pious Mary and against the coolly manipulative Elizabeth. Here, however, there’s no imbalance. In one scene our hearts break for the magnificently hot-blooded McTeer; in the next Walter shows us how she too is just as trapped and desperate. Neither woman is purely a victim, but neither are they political free agents. The look of barely contained desolation on Walter’s face in the final moments of the play-as Elizabeth emerges the winner-is chilling beyond words.

John Lahr, The New Yorker

http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/theatre/2009/04/27/090427crth_theatre_lahr

“The excellent support of John Benjamin Hickey, Chandler Williams, and Nicholas Woodeson as backbiting Tudor courtiers in Friedrich Schiller’s 1800 play “Mary Stuart” (at the Broadhurst, in an outstanding new version by Peter Oswald) gives a special wallop to the evening’s main event: the showdown between the Catholic Mary, Queen of Scots (the strapping Janet McTeer), against Queen Elizabeth I (the fine-boned Harriet Walter). “Mary Stuart” is an exercise in eloquence and intrigue. McTeer and Walter are British actors of exemplary intelligence and sinew. They are alert and articulate; they parse every nuance of every word. The political pragmatism may be predictable, but the theatrical pyrotechnics with which it’s displayed are exceptional.”

www.MaryStuartOnBroadway.com 

 

MARY STUART BEGINS PERFORMANCES TONIGHT AT THE BROADHURST THEATRE

THE BATTLE ROYAL STARTS TONIGHT!

 

PREVIEWS BEGIN THIS EVENING FOR

THE DONMAR WAREHOUSE PRODUCTION OF

FRIEDRICH SCHILLER’S

MARY STUART

 

STARRING

JANET McTEER and HARRIET WALTER

 

NEW VERSION BY

PETER OSWALD

 

DIRECTED BY

PHYLLIDA LLOYD

 

OPENING NIGHT IS SUNDAY, APRIL 19 AT THE BROADHURST THEATRE

 

 

The critically acclaimed Donmar Warehouse production of MARY STUART, starring Janet McTeer as Mary, Queen of Scots and Harriet Walter as Elizabeth I, begins performances tonight at the Broadhurst Theatre (235 West 44th Street), prior to an opening night on Sunday, April 19

 

McTeer and Walter will be recreating the performances that dazzled London, joined by a stellar supporting company of 11 actors, performing Peter Oswald’s thrilling new version of Friedrich Schiller’s classic play under the direction of Phyllida Lloyd.  

 

Seduction, greed and deception lie at the heart of the bitter rivalry between Mary, Queen of Scots (Janet McTeer) and her cousin, Elizabeth I (Harriet Walter) of England. After being implicated in her husband’s murder, Mary turns to Elizabeth for help but finds her cousin distrustful of her motives. Thus begins a bloody feud that will threaten not just their family bond, but the crown of England… MARY STUART tells the story of two iconic women whose lust for power reveals one of the most thrilling displays of passion and politics the world has ever seen.

 

Ben Brantley, New York Times, hailed this production of MARY STUART as “Ripping. A stage burner of a revival.  Mary Stuart is portrayed to a red-blooded fare-thee-well by Janet McTeer. Queen Elizabeth I is portrayed with glittering iciness by Harriet Walter.  Mary Stuart has never seemed more pertinent than it does in this vivid incarnation, staged by Phyllida Lloyd.”  The Daily Telegraph pronounced it “Exhilarating… Pure Class!”  The Times raved, “Terrific Acting, Terrific Theatre, Terrific Schiller”.   The Daily Mail called the production “Unforgettable”.  The Observer raved, “Phyllida Lloyd has provided a gleaming, intense Mary Stuart. It’s thrillingly staged and acted to the hilt”.  The Sunday Times claimed, “Both female leads crackle with the kind of gun-powder charisma that sparks devotion and forments intrigue.  In this fine production, every lie, every deception, rings true”.   

 

Janet McTeer returns to New York for the first time since she electrified Broadway with her Tony Award-winning portrayal of Nora in A Doll’s House. She won a Golden Globe and was nominated for an Academy Award for her performance in the celebrated film Tumbleweeds. Her other theatre work includes Duchess of Malfi, Uncle Vanya and A Midsummer Night’s Dream

 

Harriet Walter, considered one of England’s greatest classical actresses, is a three-time Olivier Award winner for her performances in Twelfth Night, A Question of Geography  and Three Sisters. Film credits include the Academy Award-nominated Atonement, Babel and Sense & Sensibility.

 

Peter Oswald’s thrilling adaptation of Mary Stuart won the praise of critics and audiences alike in its West End run. His previous adaptations include Schiller’s Don Carlos, Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannos and a stage version of the Sanskrit epic The Ramayana. His original works include The Swansong of Ivanhoe Westeway and Augustine’s Oak.

 

Phyllida Lloyd is one of Britain’s most important theater and opera directors. Internationally she is best known for her work on Mamma Mia!, the Tony-nominated musical sensation currently playing in 16 countries. She directed the Golden Globe-nominated film version of Mamma Mia!, which has become the highest-grossing movie helmed by a woman, as well as the highest-grossing movie ever in the UK. Her other stage credits include major productions at the National Theatre, RSC, Royal Court Theatre, Bristol Old Vic Theatre and Shakespeare’s Old Globe.

 

The Donmar Warehouse is one of London’s leading producing theatres and has garnered critical acclaim for its unparalleled catalogue of work. Since 1992, Donmar-generated productions have received 31 Olivier Awards, 20 Critics’ Circle Awards, 19 Evening Standard Awards and 13 Tony Awards. Productions in the West End include Mary Stuart, Frost/Nixon, Piaf, Guys and Dolls, Design for Living, The Glass Menagerie, Company and  The Real Thing. Productions on Broadway include Frost/Nixon (currently on tour in the US), Cabaret, Electra, The Blue Room, The Real Thing, True West, Nine and the Public Theater and Donmar collaboration of Take Me Out

 

Joining Ms. McTeer and Ms. Walter, will be Michael Countryman as Sir Amias Paulet; Adam Greer as O’Kelly; John Benjamin Hickey as Earl of Leicester; Michael Rudko as Count Aubespine/Melvil; Robert Stanton as William Davison; Maria Tucci as Hanna Kennedy; Chandler Williams as Mortimer; Nicholas Woodeson as Lord Burleigh and Brian Murray as Earl of Shrewsbury.   The company also features Jacqueline Antaramian, Tony Carlin, Monique Fowler and Guy Paul

 

The first Broadway production of MARY STUART in almost 40 years will be produced by Arielle Tepper Madover, Debra Black, Neal Street Productions/Matthew Byam Shaw, Scott Delman, Barbara Whitman, Jean Doumanian/Ruth Hendel, David Binder/CarlWend Productions/Spring Sirkin, Daryl Roth/James L. Nederlander/Chase Mishkin.  

 

The production is designed by Anthony Ward, with lighting by Hugh Vanstone and sound by Paul Arditti. 

 

The Donmar Warehouse production of MARY STUART played from July 14 through September 3, 2005.  It then transferred into London’s West End to the Apollo, where it was produced by Arielle Tepper Madover, ACT Productions, Neal Street Productions & Matthew Byam Shaw and played from October 7, 2005 to January 14, 2006.

 

Preview prices are $64-$99, including $1.50 facilities fee. Tickets for performances after April 20 are $69.50-$116.50.  Student rush tickets are $29.50 and may be purchased with valid ID at 10:00 AM at the box office, day of performance.  Limit two per person and subject to availability.  Performances are Tuesday through Saturday at 8:00 PM, with matinees Wednesday and Saturday at 2:00 PM, Sunday at 3:00 PM.  Call Telecharge at 212-239-6200 or visit www.telecharge.com.

 

# # # #

 

www.MaryStuartOnBroadway.com   

 

 

WABC PRESENTS BROADWAY BACKSTAGE: SPRING PREVIEW MARCH 28

 

WABC-7 TV PRESENTS

“BROADWAY BACKSTAGE: SPRING PREVIEW”

SATURDAY, MARCH 28 at 7:30PM-8:00 PM

 

Hosted by WABC-7 News Anchor Lori Stokes and  

Tony Award winner & ACCENT ON YOUTH star

David Hyde Pierce

 

Tune in to WABC on Channel 7 for a sneak peek at

Broadway’s hottest shows including:

 

33 VARIATIONS, ACCENT ON YOUTH, EXIT THE KING, GOD OF CARNAGE, IMPRESSIONISM, MARY STUART, THE NORMAN CONQUESTS, THE PHILANTHROPIST, WAITING FOR GODOT

 

From highly anticipated starry revivals to compelling dramas and light hearted comedies, there’s something for everyone on Broadway this spring. WABC-7 will feature cast interviews and a special behind-the-scenes look at the following new Broadway shows and events:

 

  • 33 VARIATIONS

     Jane Fonda returns to Broadway after a 46 year absence in 33 VARIATIONS, written and directed by Moisés Kaufman. Jane and Moisés talk to    WABC about this new American play.

 

  • ACCENT ON YOUTH

David Hyde Pierce, who is currently in rehearsals for Manhattan Theatre Company’s Broadway production of ACCENT ON YOUTH, co-hosts this WABC special and discusses his return to Broadway in the upcoming comedy.

 

  • EXIT THE KING   

Academy Award-winners Geoffrey Rush and Susan Sarandon talk about how much fun they are having in this new production of the Ionesco classic.

 

  • GOD OF CARNAGE

Academy Award winner Marcia Gay Harden talks about this hilarious critically-acclaimed new play by Yasmina Reza in which she stars with Jeff Daniels, Hope Davis and James Gandolfini.

 

  • IMPRESSIONISM

      WABC speaks to Tony Award winners Jeremy Irons and Joan Allen, who are starring on Broadway in the romantic new play IMPRESSIONISM.

 

  • MARY STUART

      WABC sits down with Janet McTeer who plays the title role in this acclaimed  production from the Donmar Warehouse and London’s West End.

 

  • THE NORMAN CONQUESTS

      WABC provides a sneak peak at the critically praised production of Alan Ayckbourn‘s comedy trilogy, direct from a sold out run at The Old Vic in           London. 

 

  • THE PHILANTHROPIST

Stars Matthew Broderick and Steven Weber discuss their roles as best friends and colleagues in Christopher Hampton’s 1970 award winning academic comedy.

 

  • WAITING FOR GODOT

WABC follows along as stars Nathan Lane, Bill Irwin, John Goodman and John Glover pose for a WAITING FOR GODOT cast photo shoot. 

 

 

MARY STUART BOX OFFICE OPENS MONDAY MARCH 9TH

BROADHURST THEATRE BOX OFFICE OPENS

MONDAY, MARCH 9 FOR

 

JANET McTEER               HARRIET WALTER

 

IN THE DONMAR WAREHOUSE PRODUCTION OF

FRIEDRICH SCHILLER’S

MARY STUART

 

NEW VERSION BY

PETER OSWALD

 

DIRECTED BY

PHYLLIDA LLOYD

 

ACCLAIMED PRODUCTION OPENS SUNDAY, APRIL 19

PREVIEWS BEGIN MARCH 30

 

 

The Broadhurst Theatre box office (235 West 44th Street) opens on Monday, March 9 for MARY STUART, the critically acclaimed Donmar Warehouse production, starring Janet McTeer as Mary Queen of Scots and Harriet Walter as Elizabeth I.  Performances begin Tuesday, March 30 at the Broadhurst, prior to an opening night on Sunday, April 19

 

McTeer and Walter will be recreating the performances that dazzled London, joined by a stellar supporting company of 11 actors, performing Peter Oswald’s thrilling new version of Friedrich Schiller’s classic play under the direction of Phyllida Lloyd.   The production is currently in rehearsal in New York. 

 

Seduction, greed and deception lie at the heart of the bitter rivalry between Mary, Queen of Scots (Janet McTeer) and her cousin, Elizabeth I (Harriet Walter) of England. After being implicated in her husband’s murder, Mary turns to Elizabeth for help but finds her cousin distrustful of her motives. Thus begins a bloody feud that will threaten not just their family bond, but the crown of England… MARY STUART tells the story of two iconic women whose lust for power reveals one of the most thrilling displays of passion and politics the world has ever seen.

 

Ben Brantley, New York Times, hailed this production of MARY STUART as “Ripping. A stage burner of a revival.  Mary Stuart is portrayed to a red-blooded fare-thee-well by Janet McTeer. Queen Elizabeth I is portrayed with glittering iciness by Harriet Walter.  Mary Stuart has never seemed more pertinent than it does in this vivid incarnation, staged by Phyllida Lloyd.”  The Daily Telegraph pronounced it “Exhilarating… Pure Class!”  The Times raved, “Terrific Acting, Terrific Theatre, Terrific Schiller”.   The Daily Mail called the production “Unforgettable”.  The Observer raved, “Phyllida Lloyd has provided a gleaming, intense Mary Stuart. It’s thrillingly staged and acted to the hilt”.  The Sunday Times claimed, “Both female leads crackle with the kind of gun-powder charisma that sparks devotion and forments intrigue.  In this fine production, every lie, every deception, rings true”.   

 

Janet McTeer returns to New York for the first time since she electrified Broadway with her Tony Award-winning portrayal of Nora in A Doll’s House. She won a Golden Globe and was nominated for an Academy Award for her performance in the celebrated film Tumbleweeds. Her other theatre work includes Duchess of Malfi, Uncle Vanya and A Midsummer Night’s Dream

 

Harriet Walter, considered one of England’s greatest classical actresses, is a three-time Olivier Award winner for her performances in Twelfth Night, A Question of Geography  and Three Sisters. Film credits include the Academy Award-nominated Atonement, Babel and Sense & Sensibility.

 

Peter Oswald’s thrilling adaptation of Mary Stuart won the praise of critics and audiences alike in its West End run. His previous adaptations include Schiller’s Don Carlos, Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannos and a stage version of the Sanskrit epic The Ramayana. His original works include The Swansong of Ivanhoe Westeway and Augustine’s Oak.

 

Phyllida Lloyd is one of Britain’s most important theater and opera directors. Internationally she is best known for her work on Mamma Mia!, the Tony-nominated musical sensation currently playing in 16 countries. She directed the Golden Globe-nominated film version of Mamma Mia!, which has become the highest-grossing movie helmed by a woman, as well as the highest-grossing movie ever in the UK. Her other stage credits include major productions at the National Theatre, RSC, Royal Court Theatre, Bristol Old Vic Theatre and Shakespeare’s Old Globe.

 

The Donmar Warehouse is one of London’s leading producing theatres and has garnered critical acclaim for its unparalleled catalogue of work. Since 1992, Donmar-generated productions have received 31 Olivier Awards, 20 Critics’ Circle Awards, 19 Evening Standard Awards and 13 Tony Awards. Productions in the West End include Mary Stuart, Frost/Nixon, Piaf, Guys and Dolls, Design for Living, The Glass Menagerie, Company and  The Real Thing. Productions on Broadway include Frost/Nixon (currently on tour in the US), Cabaret, Electra, The Blue Room, The Real Thing, True West, Nine and the Public Theater and Donmar collaboration of Take Me Out

 

Joining Ms. McTeer and Ms. Walter, will be Michael Countryman as Sir Amias Paulet; Adam Greer as O’Kelly; John Benjamin Hickey as Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester; Michael Rudko as Count Aubespine/Melvil; Robert Stanton as William Davison; Maria Tucci as Hanna Kennedy; Chandler Williams as Mortimer; Nicholas Woodeson as Lord Burleigh and Brian Murray as George Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury.   The company also features Jacqueline Antaramian, Tony Carlin, Monique Fowler and Guy Paul

 

The first Broadway production of MARY STUART in almost 40 years will be produced by Arielle Tepper Madover, Neal Street Productions/Matthew Byam Shaw, Debra Black, Scott M. Delman, Barbara Whitman and David Binder/Ruth Hendel.

 

The production is designed by Anthony Ward, with lighting by Hugh Vanstone and sound by Paul Arditti. 

 

The Donmar Warehouse production of MARY STUART played from July 14 through September 3, 2005.  It then transferred into London’s West End to the Apollo, where it was produced by Arielle Tepper Madover, ACT Productions, Neal Street Productions & Matthew Byam Shaw and played from October 7, 2005 to January 14, 2006.

 

Preview prices are $64-$99, including $1.50 facilities fee. Tickets for performances after April 20 are $69.50-$116.50.  Performances are Tuesday through Saturday at 8:00 PM, with matinees Wednesday and Saturday at 2:00 PM, Sunday at 3:00 PM.  Call Telecharge at 212-239-6200 or visit www.telecharge.com.

 

# # # #

 

www.MaryStuartOnBroadway.com  

 

MARY STUART STARRING JANET MCTEER AND HARRIET WALTER GOES INTO REHEARSAL MONDAY

THE DONMAR WAREHOUSE PRODUCTION OF

FRIEDRICH SCHILLER’S

MARY STUART

STARRING

JANET McTEER and HARRIET WALTER,

GOES INTO REHEARSAL MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23

 

NEW VERSION BY

PETER OSWALD

 

DIRECTED BY

PHYLLIDA LLOYD

 

ACCLAIMED PRODUCTION OPENS SUNDAY, APRIL 19

AT THE BROADHURST THEATRE; PREVIEWS BEGIN MARCH 30

 

 

The critically acclaimed Donmar Warehouse production of Friedrich Schiller’s MARY STUART, starring Janet McTeer as Mary Queen of Scots and Harriet Walter as Elizabeth I, goes into rehearsal on Monday, February 23 in New York.  McTeer and Walter will be recreating the performances that dazzled London, joined by a stellar supporting company of 11 actors, performing Peter Oswald’s praised new version of Schiller’s classic play under the direction of Phyllida Lloyd.   Performances begin Tuesday, March 30, prior to an opening night on Sunday, April 19 at the Broadhurst Theatre (235 West 44th Street). 

 

Seduction, greed and deception lie at the heart of the bitter rivalry between Mary, Queen of Scots (Janet McTeer) and her cousin, Elizabeth I (Harriet Walter) of England. After being implicated in her husband’s murder, Mary turns to Elizabeth for help but finds her cousin distrustful of her motives. Thus begins a bloody feud that will threaten not just their family bond, but the crown of England… MARY STUART tells the story of two iconic women whose lust for power reveals one of the most thrilling displays of passion and politics the world has ever seen.

 

Janet McTeer returns to New York for the first time since she electrified Broadway with her Tony Award-winning portrayal of Nora in A Doll’s House. She won a Golden Globe and was nominated for an Academy Award for her performance in the celebrated film Tumbleweeds. Her other theatre work includes Duchess of Malfi, Uncle Vanya and A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

 

Harriet Walter, considered one of England’s greatest classical actresses, is a three-time Olivier Award winner for her performances in Twelfth Night, A Question of Geography  and Three Sisters. Film credits include the Academy Award-nominated Atonement, Babel and Sense & Sensibility.

 

Peter Oswald’s thrilling adaptation of Mary Stuart won the praise of critics and audiences alike in its West End run. His previous adaptations include Schiller’s Don Carlos, Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannos and a stage version of the Sanskrit epic The Ramayana. His original works include The Swansong of Ivanhoe Westeway and Augustine’s Oak.

 

Phyllida Lloyd is one of Britain’s most important theater and opera directors. Internationally she is best known for her work on Mamma Mia!, the Tony-nominated musical sensation currently playing in 16 countries. She directed the Golden Globe-nominated film version of Mamma Mia!, which has become the highest-grossing movie helmed by a woman, as well as the highest-grossing movie ever in the UK. Her other stage credits include major productions at the National Theatre, RSC, Royal Court Theatre, Bristol Old Vic Theatre and Shakespeare’s Old Globe.

 

The Donmar Warehouse is one of London’s leading producing theatres and has garnered critical acclaim for its unparalleled catalogue of work. Since 1992, Donmar-generated productions have received 31 Olivier Awards, 20 Critics’ Circle Awards, 19 Evening Standard Awards and 13 Tony Awards. Productions in the West End include Mary Stuart, Frost/Nixon, Piaf, Guys and Dolls, Design for Living, The Glass Menagerie, Company and  The Real Thing. Productions on Broadway include Frost/Nixon (currently on tour in the US), Cabaret, Electra, The Blue Room, The Real Thing, True West, Nine and the Public Theater and Donmar collaboration of Take Me Out

 

The first Broadway production of MARY STUART in almost 40 years will be produced by Arielle Tepper Madover, Debra Black, Scott M. Delman, Barbara Whitman, David Binder/Ruth Hendel, Neal Street Productions/Matthew Byam Shaw.

 

Joining Ms. McTeer and Ms. Walter, will be Michael Countryman (Night Must Fall, Laughter on the 23rd Floor) as Sir Amias Paulet; John Benjamin Hickey (Cabaret, Love! Valour! Compassion!,) as Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester; Michael Rudko (The Best Man, Serious Money) as Count Aubespine/Melvil; Robert Stanton (The Coast of Utopia, All in the Timing) as William Davison; Maria Tucci (Tony Award nominee for The Rose Tattoo) as Hanna Kennedy; Chandler Williams (Translations) as Mortimer; Nicholas Woodeson (Jumpers, An Inspector Calls) as William Cecil, Lord Burleigh; and three-time Tony Award nominee Brian Murray (Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, Da, Noises Off) as George Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury. 

 

Ben Brantley, New York Times, hailed this production of MARY STUART as “Ripping. A stage burner of a revival.  Mary Stuart is portrayed to a red-blooded fare-thee-well by Janet McTeer. Queen Elizabeth I is portrayed with glittering iciness by Harriet Walter.  Mary Stuart has never seemed more pertinent than it does in this vivid incarnation, staged by Phyllida Lloyd.”  The Daily Telegraph pronounced it “Exhilarating… Pure Class!”  The Times raved, “Terrific Acting, Terrific Theatre, Terrific Schiller”.   The Daily Mail called the production “Unforgettable”.  The Observer raved, “Phyllida Lloyd has provided a gleaming, intense Mary Stuart. It’s thrillingly staged and acted to the hilt”.  The Sunday Times claimed, “Both female leads crackle with the kind of gun-powder charisma that sparks devotion and forments intrigue.  In this fine production, every lie, every deception, rings true”.   

 

The Donmar Warehouse production of MARY STUART played from July 14 through September 3, 2005.  It then transferred into London’s West End to the Apollo, where it was produced by Arielle Tepper Madover, ACT Productions, Neal Street Productions & Matthew Byam Shaw and played from October 7, 2005 to January 14, 2006.

 

The production is designed by Anthony Ward, with lighting by Hugh Vanstone and sound by Paul Arditti. 

 

Preview prices are $64-$99, including $1.50 facilities fee. Tickets for performances after April 20 are $69.50-$116.50.  Performances are Tuesday through Saturday at 8:00 PM, with matinees Wednesday and Saturday at 2:00 PM, Sunday at 3:00 PM.  Call Telecharge at 212-239-6200 or visit www.telecharge.com.

 

# # # #

 

www.MaryStuartOnBroadway.com