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Final week to see Mary Stuart on Broadway

“It’s hard not to be at least a little in love with — and more than a little in awe of — Janet McTeer and Harriet Walter, the very leading ladies in Phyllida Lloyd’s crackling, terrifically exciting revival of MARY STUART. 

A show that relentlessly keeps you on the edge on your seat.

— Ben Brantley, THE NEW YORK TIMES

FINAL WEEK TO SEE

JANET McTEER         HARRIET WALTER

IN THE DONMAR WAREHOUSE PRODUCTION OF

FRIEDRICH SCHILLER’S

MARY STUART

NEW VERSION BY PETER OSWALD

DIRECTED BY PHYLLIDA LLOYD

LIMITED RUN THROUGH SUNDAY, AUGUST 16 AT THE BROADHURST THEATRE

The Donmar Warehouse production of Friedrich Schiller’s MARY STUART, starring Janet McTeer as Mary, Queen of Scots and Harriet Walter as Elizabeth I, in a new version by Peter Oswald and directed by Phyllida Lloyd is now in the final week of its limited run on Broadway at the Broadhurst Theatre (235 West 44th Street).  The critically acclaimed production plays through Sunday, August 16 only.   

Seduction, greed and deception lie at the heart of the bitter rivalry between Mary, Queen of Scots (Janet McTeer) and her cousin, Elizabeth I (Harriet Walter) of England. After being implicated in her husband’s murder, Mary turns to Elizabeth for help but finds her cousin distrustful of her motives. Thus begins a bloody feud that will threaten not just their family bond, but the crown of England… MARY STUART tells the story of two iconic women whose lust for power reveals one of the most thrilling displays of passion and politics the world has ever seen.

Joining Ms. McTeer and Ms. Walter are Michael Countryman as Sir Amias Paulet; Adam Greer as O’Kelly; John Benjamin Hickey as Earl of Leicester; Michael Rudko as Count Aubespine/Melvil; Robert Stanton as William Davison; Maria Tucci as Hanna Kennedy; Chandler Williams as Mortimer; Nicholas Woodeson as Lord Burleigh and Brian Murray as Earl of Shrewsbury.   The company also features Jacqueline Antaramian, Tony Carlin, Monique Fowler and Guy Paul

The first Broadway production of MARY STUART in almost 40 years is produced by Arielle Tepper Madover, Debra Black, Neal Street Productions/Matthew Byam Shaw, Scott Delman, Barbara Whitman, Jean Doumanian/Ruth Hendel, David Binder/CarlWend Productions/Spring Sirkin, Daryl Roth/James L. Nederlander/Chase Mishkin.

The production is designed by Anthony Ward, with lighting by Hugh Vanstone and sound by Paul Arditti. 

The Donmar Warehouse production of MARY STUART played from July 14 through September 3, 2005.  It then transferred into London’s West End to the Apollo, where it was produced by Arielle Tepper Madover, ACT Productions, Neal Street Productions & Matthew Byam Shaw and played from October 7, 2005 to January 14, 2006.

Tickets are $69.50-$116.50.  Performances are Tuesday through Saturday at 8:00 PM, with matinees Wednesday and Saturday at 2:00 PM, Sunday at 3:00 PM.  Call Telecharge at 212-239-6200 or visit www.telecharge.com.

 www.MaryStuartOnBroadway.com  

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Final four weeks to see Mary Stuart on Broadway

“It’s hard not to be at least a little in love with — and more than a little in awe of — Janet McTeer and Harriet Walter,

the very leading ladies in Phyllida Lloyd’s crackling, terrifically exciting revival of MARY STUART. 

A show that relentlessly keeps you on the edge on your seat.

— Ben Brantley, THE NEW YORK TIMES

FINAL FOUR WEEKS TO SEE

JANET McTEER         HARRIET WALTER

IN THE DONMAR WAREHOUSE PRODUCTION OF

FRIEDRICH SCHILLER’S

MARY STUART

NEW VERSION BY PETER OSWALD

DIRECTED BY PHYLLIDA LLOYD

LIMITED RUN THROUGH SUNDAY, AUGUST 16 AT THE BROADHURST THEATRE

The Donmar Warehouse production of Friedrich Schiller’s MARY STUART, starring Janet McTeer as Mary, Queen of Scots and Harriet Walter as Elizabeth I, in a new version by Peter Oswald and directed by Phyllida Lloyd is now in the final four weeks of its limited run on Broadway at the Broadhurst Theatre (235 West 44th Street).  The critically acclaimed production plays through Sunday, August 16 only.   

Seduction, greed and deception lie at the heart of the bitter rivalry between Mary, Queen of Scots (Janet McTeer) and her cousin, Elizabeth I (Harriet Walter) of England. After being implicated in her husband’s murder, Mary turns to Elizabeth for help but finds her cousin distrustful of her motives. Thus begins a bloody feud that will threaten not just their family bond, but the crown of England… MARY STUART tells the story of two iconic women whose lust for power reveals one of the most thrilling displays of passion and politics the world has ever seen.

Joining Ms. McTeer and Ms. Walter are Michael Countryman as Sir Amias Paulet; Adam Greer as O’Kelly; John Benjamin Hickey as Earl of Leicester; Michael Rudko as Count Aubespine/Melvil; Robert Stanton as William Davison; Maria Tucci as Hanna Kennedy; Chandler Williams as Mortimer; Nicholas Woodeson as Lord Burleigh and Brian Murray as Earl of Shrewsbury.   The company also features Jacqueline Antaramian, Tony Carlin, Monique Fowler and Guy Paul

The first Broadway production of MARY STUART in almost 40 years is produced by Arielle Tepper Madover, Debra Black, Neal Street Productions/Matthew Byam Shaw, Scott Delman, Barbara Whitman, Jean Doumanian/Ruth Hendel, David Binder/CarlWend Productions/Spring Sirkin, Daryl Roth/James L. Nederlander/Chase Mishkin.

The production is designed by Anthony Ward, with lighting by Hugh Vanstone and sound by Paul Arditti. 

The Donmar Warehouse production of MARY STUART played from July 14 through September 3, 2005.  It then transferred into London’s West End to the Apollo, where it was produced by Arielle Tepper Madover, ACT Productions, Neal Street Productions & Matthew Byam Shaw and played from October 7, 2005 to January 14, 2006.

Tickets are $69.50-$116.50.  Performances are Tuesday through Saturday at 8:00 PM, with matinees Wednesday and Saturday at 2:00 PM, Sunday at 3:00 PM.  Call Telecharge at 212-239-6200 or visit www.telecharge.com.

Mary Stuart star Janet McTeer receives Emmy nomination for “Into the Storm”

AN EMMY FOR CLEMMIE?

MARY STUART STAR JANET McTEER

NOMINATED FOR AN EMMY AWARD FOR HER PERFORMANCE

AS CLEMENTINE CHURCHILL IN HBO’S “INTO THE STORM”

MARY STUART star Janet McTeer received an Emmy Award nomination this morning for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie for her performance as Clementine Churchill in HBO’s “Into the Storm”.   The Emmy Awards will be presented on September 20. 

The Donmar Warehouse production of Friedrich Schiller’s MARY STUART, in a new version by Peter Oswald and directed by Phyllida Lloyd is playing at the Broadhurst Theatre (235 West 44th Street) through August 16 only.   The production stars Janet McTeer as Mary, Queen of Scots and Harriet Walter as Elizabeth I.

Seduction, greed and deception lie at the heart of the bitter rivalry between Mary, Queen of Scots (Janet McTeer) and her cousin, Elizabeth I (Harriet Walter) of England. After being implicated in her husband’s murder, Mary turns to Elizabeth for help but finds her cousin distrustful of her motives. Thus begins a bloody feud that will threaten not just their family bond, but the crown of England… MARY STUART tells the story of two iconic women whose lust for power reveals one of the most thrilling displays of passion and politics the world has ever seen.

Joining Ms. McTeer and Ms. Walter are Michael Countryman as Sir Amias Paulet; Adam Greer as O’Kelly; John Benjamin Hickey as Earl of Leicester; Michael Rudko as Count Aubespine/Melvil; Robert Stanton as William Davison; Maria Tucci as Hanna Kennedy; Chandler Williams as Mortimer; Nicholas Woodeson as Lord Burleigh and Brian Murray as Earl of Shrewsbury.   The company also features Jacqueline Antaramian, Tony Carlin, Monique Fowler and Guy Paul

The first Broadway production of MARY STUART in almost 40 years is produced by Arielle Tepper Madover, Debra Black, Neal Street Productions/Matthew Byam Shaw, Scott Delman, Barbara Whitman, Jean Doumanian/Ruth Hendel, David Binder/CarlWend Productions/Spring Sirkin, Daryl Roth/James L. Nederlander/Chase Mishkin.

The production is designed by Anthony Ward, with lighting by Hugh Vanstone and sound by Paul Arditti. 

The Donmar Warehouse production of MARY STUART played from July 14 through September 3, 2005.  It then transferred into London’s West End to the Apollo, where it was produced by Arielle Tepper Madover, ACT Productions, Neal Street Productions & Matthew Byam Shaw and played from October 7, 2005 to January 14, 2006.

Tickets are $69.50-$116.50.  Performances are Tuesday through Saturday at 8:00 PM, with matinees Wednesday and Saturday at 2:00 PM, Sunday at 3:00 PM.  Call Telecharge at 212-239-6200 or visit www.telecharge.com.

BROADWAY’S MARY STUART IN THE NEWS

BROADWAY’S MARY STUART

IN THE NEWS

 

The Donmar Warehouse production of Friedrich Schiller’s MARY STUART, in a new version by Peter Oswald and directed by Phyllida Lloyd, opened on Sunday, April 19 at the Broadhurst Theatre (235 West 44th Street).  The production stars Janet McTeer as Mary, Queen of Scots and Harriet Walter as Queen Elizabeth I. 

 

The production, which received rave reviews from critics, is nominated for seven Tony Awards, including Revival of a Play, Actress in a Play (Janet McTeer, Harriet Walter) and Director of a Play (Phyllida Lloyd).  McTeer is also the winner of the 2009 Drama Desk Award for Actress in a Play for her performance. 

 

Here are some recent stories featuring the production:

 

Associated Press

Queen to Queen: McTeer, Walter talk Tonys and more

By Douglas J. Rowe

 

Queen to Queen’s sofa. Your move.

 

Janet McTeer and Harriet Walter bookend the couch in McTeer’s dressing room. The two British actresses are both nominated for best actress Tony Awards, and while they’re both pleased by the honor, neither likes the idea of competing.

 

“It’s not nice. It’s no fun,” McTeer says. “But we would, both of us, absolutely adore if Phyllida got one, because she’s a genius.”

 

She’s, of course, talking about Phyllida Lloyd, the director of the critically acclaimed Broadway drama, Mary Stuart.

 

Walter plays England’s Queen Elizabeth I and McTeer the title role of Mary, Queen of Scots.  McTeer has already picked up this year’s Drama Desk Award for her portrayal of the doomed Mary, and she has a Tony for her performance in A Doll’s House, in 1997.

 

To read the complete article, click here: http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5iuH7eRzP_XBmIiL5SA5HKjwvrK5wD98IGAVO0

 

New York Magazine

Command Performances

As the Queen of Scots or Mrs. Churchill, Janet McTeer demands attention.

By Jesse Green

 

A Broadway beheading was never such a high as it is for Janet McTeer in the title role of Mary Stuart. Though the Scots queen has been imprisoned, rained upon for twelve solid minutes, and sentenced to death, she goes to the ax happily, beaming with faith. “And since I am still her when I come offstage,” says the strapping McTeer, “that happiness comes with me—at least until I fall asleep two hours later.”

 

Great performances are forged in the tension between an actor’s sufficiency and insufficiency: Janet McTeer is clearly not Mary Stuart, and yet, for those three hours, eight times a week, Mary Stuart can only be Janet McTeer. To turn what could easily have been a botch into a triumph (McTeer is up for her second Tony award in June) takes technique—and then “years of practice” to make it disappear. “You should be able to do it like driving a car,” she says—or like a plane whose wheels retract after takeoff.

 

To read the complete article, click here:

http://nymag.com/arts/theater/features/56906/

 

 

New York Times

Forget the Ingénues; Cue the Grown-Ups

By Patti Cohen

 

In Mary Stuart the British stage actress Harriet Walter, 58, is the 16th century’s most powerful woman, Queen Elizabeth, while Janet McTeer, 48, is her nemesis — roles that have earned them both nominations for best actress at the Tony Awards.

 

In film “women’s roles on the whole are defined in terms of their family relationship to the hero,” Ms. Walter said from her basement dressing room at the Broadhurst Theater, not far from a tank that collects the 400 gallons of water it takes to produce an onstage thunderstorm. “They are the wife, the girlfriend, the mother, the daughter. Rather than being the center of their own story, they’re usually a planet revolving around a male figure.”

 

“It’s not that you want the big central roles necessarily,” she continued. “It’s just that you want your person to have a life outside, to be a complex three-dimensional person who isn’t just there to offset somebody else or fulfill a function in the story.”

 

To read the complete article, click on the following link:

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/24/theater/24cohe.html?scp=1&sq=Cue%20the%20Ingenues&st=cse

 

 

The Leonard Lopate Show, WNYC Radio

Girls and Women

 

The new production of Mary Stuart is the first Broadway revival of the show in 40 years and we’re joined by two of its stars: Janet McTeer and Harriet Walter.

 

To listen to the interview, click on the following link:

http://www.wnyc.org/shows/lopate/episodes/2009/05/22

 

 

Bergen Record

A water-drenched speech

By Bob Feldberg

 

Sometimes, a scene in a show, or a performance, hits you in a certain way.

 

It may have something to do with excellence, but it needn’t. It’s just a moment that jumps out and plants itself in your brain, to stay.

 

As a fond farewell to the 2008-09 Broadway theater season, here are some of my memorable moments:

 

In Mary Stuart, rain falls in one of the key dramatic scenes. But it isn’t that showery kind of precipitation you sometimes see in a production.

 

This is a downpour, a drenching, flooding rain. And as a soaked-to-the-skin Janet McTeer, playing Mary, Queen of Scots, delivers her most intense speech of the evening, you wonder whether she’ll finish it before contracting pneumonia.

 

To read the complete article, click here:

http://www.northjersey.com/entertainment/stage/Feldberg_A_water-drenched_speech_and_gender-bending_flair.html

 

 

Backstage

Tony Talk

A roundtable chat about craft and career with six nominees for Broadway’s biggest honor

By Simi Horowitz

 

Back Stage: Was there ever an artistic turning point when you saw the approach to acting in a new light?

Harriet Walter: One of the moments that unlocked something for me was a production of All’s Well That Ends Well. In England I did it with Peggy Ashcroft. She was in her 70s, and I was in my late 20s, early 30s. It was a difficult part for me and I was working myself up to tears and torment—the right state to be in for that character—while Peggy Ashcroft would be sitting calmly in her chair, getting the little details right, like where her bag was going to be placed. Her performance was so simple and so immediately direct and there was no fuss. And I remember her saying, “The audience doesn’t really know if you’re crying. Just get to that moment in the play, and you’ll reach it when you reach it. You’re taking yourself out of the time of the play if you’re trying to cook yourself up into something.” She started that lesson that I’m learning every night: that I just sit and receive and exist in the moment. But it takes 30 years to get there. It was a lesson of peeling away, simplifying, and not putting yourself and your angst in the way of communicating.

 

To read the complete article, click here:

http://www.backstage.com/bso/news-and-features-features/tony-talk-1003977682.story?imw=Y

 

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www.MaryStuartOnBroadway.com 

 

 

HIGHLIGHTS OF A STAR-FILLED 08-09 BROADWAY SEASON

2008-2009 Broadway Season Officially Ends

 

HIGHLIGHTS OF AN HISTORIC STAR-FILLED YEAR,

PACKED WITH PLAYS,  INCLUDES: 

 

The Seagull • A Man For All Seasons •  To Be Or Not To Be • All My Sons • White Christmas 

 Shrek •  Pal Joey •  Soul of Shaolin•  The American Plan  • Hedda Gabler •  33 Variations 

God Of Carnage •  Impressionism •  Exit The King • Mary Stuart •  The Norman Conquests 

The Philanthropist • Accent on Youth •  Waiting for Godot 

 

as well as the stars:

Joan Allen •  Matthew Broderick •  Stockard Channing    Jeff Daniels   Hope Davis

Jane Fonda    Sutton Foster   James Gandolfini •  John Glover •  John Goodman

Colin Hanks   Marcia Gay Harden • Katie Holmes   Jeremy Irons  •  Bill Irwin

Brian d’Arcy James   Nathan Lane •   Frank Langella John Lithgow   Samantha Mathis

Jan Maxwell   Janet McTeer •  Mary Loiuse Parker    David Hyde Pierce

Lily Rabe  David Rasche   Matthew Risch     Mercedes Ruehl    Geoffrey Rush

Susan Sarandon •  Peter Sarsgaard   Christopher Sieber  Kristin Scott Thomas

Harriet Walter • Steven Weber •  Dianne Wiest   Patrick Wilson

 

Visit the link below for a 2.5 minute glance back at the stars and shows this season

www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZ1ZH2TZNT8

 

 

Here are some highlights from the season. 

 

This was one of the busiest, starriest and eclectic Broadway seasons in years, featuring productions and performances that will make it one to remember.   Starting in October with The Seagull starring Kristin Scott Thomas and Peter Sarsgaard, through last night’s Roundabout Theatre Company revival of Waiting for Godot starring Nathan Lane, Bill Irwin, John Goodman and John Glover, 43 productions have opened on Broadway, including 10 new musicals, nine new plays, four musical revivals, 16 play revivals and five “special events.” 

 

Fall kicked off with the Royal Court’s acclaimed production of Chekhov’s The Seagull directed Ian Rickson, examining the romantic entanglements and regrets of a group of artists gathered on a Russian estate. 

 

Roundabout Theatre Company began autumn exploring politics, religion and power with Frank Langella in A Man for All Seasons directed by Doug Hughes, and wrapped up 2008 with Stockard Channing , Martha Plimpton  and Matthew Risch in Pal Joey, directed by Joe Mantello.  Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler starring Mary Louise Parker rang in the new year at Roundabout, in an adaptation by Christopher Shinn.

 

 

Arthur Miller’s All My Sons, asked audiences to reexamine the costs of war when it returned to Broadway this fall, directed by Simon McBurney and starring John Lithgow, Patrick Wilson, Dianne Wiest and Katie Holmes. 

 

Snow fell early on Broadway when Irving Berlin’s White Christmas, a new stage adaptation of the classic film, opened in November starring Stephen Bogardus, Kerry O’Malley, Jeffry Denman and Meredith Patterson, featuring direction by Tony Award winner Walter Bobbie and choreography by Randy Skinner.

 

The Great White Way saw green in December when Shrek The Musical landed at the Broadway Theatre starring Brian d’Arcy James as the loveable ogre and Sutton Foster as Princess Fiona. Also starring Daniel Breaker, Christopher Sieber and John Tartaglia, the new musical is directed by Jason Moore and written by David Lindsay Abaire (book & lyrics) and Jeanine Tesori (musical) with choreography by Josh Prince.   Flying monks were spotted a few blocks south when Soul of Shaolin played a limited run at the Minskoff.

 

Manhattan Theatre Club opened their season with To Be Or Not to Be, directed by Casey Nicholaw and began the new year in the Catskill Mountains of the 1960s with Richard Greenberg’s The American Plan starring Mercedes Ruehl and Lily Rabe.  They wrapped up their season with Samuel Raphaelson’s on-and-off stage love story, Accent on Youth starring David Hyde Pierce and directed by Daniel Sullivan.

 

This spring, Jane Fonda returned to Broadway after 46 years to confront an obsession with Beethoven and to settle with her on stage daughter played by Samantha Mathis in Moisés Kaufman’s 33 Variations, alongside Colin Hanks and Zach Grenier.  Jeff Daniels, Hope Davis, James Gandolfini and Marcia Gay Harden tried to make nice (and failed) in Yasmina Reza’s comedy God of Carnage directed by Matthew Warchus.  Jeremy Irons and Joan Allen returned to Broadway after long absences to star in Michael Jacobs’ examination of art and love in Impressionism, directed by Tony Award-winner Jack O’Brien.

 

Fictitious monarchs Geoffrey Rush, Susan Sarandon, and Lauren Ambrose – and unappreciated servant Andrea Martin – added their regal presence to the Rialto in Eugene Ionesco’s Exit the King under the direction of Broadway newcomer Neil Armfield.  Historic British royalty was welcomed when Harriet Walter and Janet McTeer took to the stage in the Donmar Warehouse production of Mary Stuart, directed by Phyllida Lloyd.  And The Norman Conquests, Alan Ayckbourn’s trilogy, showcased a somewhat more middle class group of Brits, helmed by the busy Matthew Warchus.

 

Christopher Hampton’s The Philanthropist , directed by David Grindley and starring Matthew Broderick and Steven Weber, looked at the empty, insular lives of college intellectuals.  Appropriately closing the season is Samuel Beckett’s historic Waiting for Godot starring Nathan Lane, Bill Irwin, John Goodman and John Glover, and directed by Anthony Page.  It tells of two seemingly homeless men waiting for someone or something to explain life’s meaning – which, of course, never shows up.  Vladimir and Estragon might be relieved to know that as of yesterday, this year’s season has arrived at its end.

 

Please visit the link below for a 2.5 minute long glance back at the stars and shows this season  www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZ1ZH2TZNT8

 

 

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MARY STUART STAR HARRIET WALTER AT DRAMA BOOK SHOP ON MAY 4

MARY STUART STAR
HARRIET WALTER
TO APPEAR AT DRAMA BOOK SHOP ON MAY 4

WALTER DISCUSSES ACCLAIMED PRODUCTION

OF SCHILLER’S CLASSIC PLAY AND HER BOOK, OTHER PEOPLE’S SHOES,

WITH THEATERMANIA’S DAVID FINKLE

Harriet Walter, who stars as Elizabeth I in the acclaimed new Broadway production of Friedrich Schiller’s MARY STUART, will speak on Monday, May 4 at 6:00 PM at The Drama Book Shop (250 West 40th Street).  In a conversation with TheaterMania’s chief theatre critic David Finkle, Walter will discuss her guide for actors, Other People’s Shoes, as well as the praised new version of Schiller’s MARY STUART, written by Peter Oswald.  The event is free and open to the public.  Seats are available on a first come, first served basis. 

Harriet Walter, considered one of England’s greatest classical actresses, is a three-time Olivier Award winner for her performances in Twelfth Night, A Question of Geography  and Three Sisters. Her film credits include the Academy Award-nominated Atonement, Babel and Sense & Sensibility.

Walter stars opposite Janet McTeer as Mary, Queen of Scots in the Donmar Warehouse production of MARY STUART, in a new version by Peter Oswald and directed by Phyllida Lloyd.  The production is playing at the Broadhurst Theatre (235 West 44th Street) for a limited engagement through August 16. 

Seduction, greed and deception lie at the heart of the bitter rivalry between Mary, Queen of Scots (Janet McTeer) and her cousin, Elizabeth I (Harriet Walter) of England. After being implicated in her husband’s murder, Mary turns to Elizabeth for help but finds her cousin distrustful of her motives. Thus begins a bloody feud that will threaten not just their family bond, but the crown of England… MARY STUART tells the story of two iconic women whose lust for power reveals one of the most thrilling displays of passion and politics the world has ever seen.

Joining Ms. McTeer and Ms. Walter, are Michael Countryman as Sir Amias Paulet; Adam Greer as O’Kelly; John Benjamin Hickey as Earl of Leicester; Michael Rudko as Count Aubespine/Melvil; Robert Stanton as William Davison; Maria Tucci as Hanna Kennedy; Chandler Williams as Mortimer; Nicholas Woodeson as Lord Burleigh and Brian Murray as Earl of Shrewsbury.   The company also features Jacqueline Antaramian, Tony Carlin, Monique Fowler and Guy Paul

The first Broadway production of MARY STUART in almost 40 years is produced by Arielle Tepper Madover, Debra Black, Neal Street Productions/Matthew Byam Shaw, Scott Delman, Barbara Whitman, Jean Doumanian/Ruth Hendel, David Binder/CarlWend Productions/Spring Sirkin, Daryl Roth/James L. Nederlander/Chase Miskin.

The production is designed by Anthony Ward, with lighting by Hugh Vanstone and sound by Paul Arditti. 

The Donmar Warehouse production of MARY STUART played from July 14 through September 3, 2005.  It then transferred into London’s West End to the Apollo, where it was produced by Arielle Tepper Madover, ACT Productions, Neal Street Productions & Matthew Byam Shaw and played from October 7, 2005 to January 14, 2006.

Tickets are $69.50-$116.50.  Performances are Tuesday through Saturday at 8:00 PM, with matinees Wednesday and Saturday at 2:00 PM, Sunday at 3:00 PM.  Call Telecharge at 212-239-6200 or visit www.telecharge.com.

www.MaryStuartOnBroadway.com  

MARY STUART DESIGNER ANTHONY WARD FEATURED ON W.COM

 

ANTHONY WARD FEATURED ON W.COM

 

 

EDITOR’S BLOG

MARY STUART: COSTUME DRAMA DRAMA

 

Once in a while, something nifty can come of reduced circumstances. Such is the case with the stunningly stripped-down new production of Mary Stuart at the Broadhurst Theater, which I saw right before it opened to rave reviews on Sunday. Faced with a budget that wouldn’t allow for full-on Elizabethan excess, British costume and set designer Anthony Ward opted to outfit only the play’s two queens in period dress. The guys-and there’s a veritable horde of them-merely wear business suits. In other words, there’s no Jonathan Rhys Meyers equivalent trotting around in gonzo Tudor finery. And though it’s a bit jarring at first, the juxtaposition of creaky versus modern totally works. 

 

According to Ward, who was also responsible for the look of the original London production at the Donmar Warehouse, budget constraints even dictated the limited number of costume changes for female leads Janet McTeer (Mary Queen of Scots) and Harriet Walter (Elizabeth). In total, Elizabeth wears just three gowns, and Mary just two. What few dresses they do wear aren’t piled with jewels either. For Mary, who has been ruthlessly liberated from all earthly treasures and imprisoned for nearly 20 years when the play opens, bijoux simply aren’t an option. But even the all-powerful Elizabeth isn’t all rocked-out. Rather, for much of the first act, Ward lets a gown of Chinese brocade create the grandeur. “It’s like a gold medallion on a black duchesse satin,” he explains. “You get that notion of clusters of jewels, but in a rather simple way.”

 

To read the complete article, please click on the following link:

http://www.wmagazine.com/w/blogs/editorsblog/2009/04/22/once-in-a-while-something.htm?printable=true

 

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www.MaryStuartOnBroadway.com