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HIGHLIGHTS OF A STAR-FILLED 08-09 BROADWAY SEASON

2008-2009 Broadway Season Officially Ends

 

HIGHLIGHTS OF AN HISTORIC STAR-FILLED YEAR,

PACKED WITH PLAYS,  INCLUDES: 

 

The Seagull • A Man For All Seasons •  To Be Or Not To Be • All My Sons • White Christmas 

 Shrek •  Pal Joey •  Soul of Shaolin•  The American Plan  • Hedda Gabler •  33 Variations 

God Of Carnage •  Impressionism •  Exit The King • Mary Stuart •  The Norman Conquests 

The Philanthropist • Accent on Youth •  Waiting for Godot 

 

as well as the stars:

Joan Allen •  Matthew Broderick •  Stockard Channing    Jeff Daniels   Hope Davis

Jane Fonda    Sutton Foster   James Gandolfini •  John Glover •  John Goodman

Colin Hanks   Marcia Gay Harden • Katie Holmes   Jeremy Irons  •  Bill Irwin

Brian d’Arcy James   Nathan Lane •   Frank Langella John Lithgow   Samantha Mathis

Jan Maxwell   Janet McTeer •  Mary Loiuse Parker    David Hyde Pierce

Lily Rabe  David Rasche   Matthew Risch     Mercedes Ruehl    Geoffrey Rush

Susan Sarandon •  Peter Sarsgaard   Christopher Sieber  Kristin Scott Thomas

Harriet Walter • Steven Weber •  Dianne Wiest   Patrick Wilson

 

Visit the link below for a 2.5 minute glance back at the stars and shows this season

www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZ1ZH2TZNT8

 

 

Here are some highlights from the season. 

 

This was one of the busiest, starriest and eclectic Broadway seasons in years, featuring productions and performances that will make it one to remember.   Starting in October with The Seagull starring Kristin Scott Thomas and Peter Sarsgaard, through last night’s Roundabout Theatre Company revival of Waiting for Godot starring Nathan Lane, Bill Irwin, John Goodman and John Glover, 43 productions have opened on Broadway, including 10 new musicals, nine new plays, four musical revivals, 16 play revivals and five “special events.” 

 

Fall kicked off with the Royal Court’s acclaimed production of Chekhov’s The Seagull directed Ian Rickson, examining the romantic entanglements and regrets of a group of artists gathered on a Russian estate. 

 

Roundabout Theatre Company began autumn exploring politics, religion and power with Frank Langella in A Man for All Seasons directed by Doug Hughes, and wrapped up 2008 with Stockard Channing , Martha Plimpton  and Matthew Risch in Pal Joey, directed by Joe Mantello.  Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler starring Mary Louise Parker rang in the new year at Roundabout, in an adaptation by Christopher Shinn.

 

 

Arthur Miller’s All My Sons, asked audiences to reexamine the costs of war when it returned to Broadway this fall, directed by Simon McBurney and starring John Lithgow, Patrick Wilson, Dianne Wiest and Katie Holmes. 

 

Snow fell early on Broadway when Irving Berlin’s White Christmas, a new stage adaptation of the classic film, opened in November starring Stephen Bogardus, Kerry O’Malley, Jeffry Denman and Meredith Patterson, featuring direction by Tony Award winner Walter Bobbie and choreography by Randy Skinner.

 

The Great White Way saw green in December when Shrek The Musical landed at the Broadway Theatre starring Brian d’Arcy James as the loveable ogre and Sutton Foster as Princess Fiona. Also starring Daniel Breaker, Christopher Sieber and John Tartaglia, the new musical is directed by Jason Moore and written by David Lindsay Abaire (book & lyrics) and Jeanine Tesori (musical) with choreography by Josh Prince.   Flying monks were spotted a few blocks south when Soul of Shaolin played a limited run at the Minskoff.

 

Manhattan Theatre Club opened their season with To Be Or Not to Be, directed by Casey Nicholaw and began the new year in the Catskill Mountains of the 1960s with Richard Greenberg’s The American Plan starring Mercedes Ruehl and Lily Rabe.  They wrapped up their season with Samuel Raphaelson’s on-and-off stage love story, Accent on Youth starring David Hyde Pierce and directed by Daniel Sullivan.

 

This spring, Jane Fonda returned to Broadway after 46 years to confront an obsession with Beethoven and to settle with her on stage daughter played by Samantha Mathis in Moisés Kaufman’s 33 Variations, alongside Colin Hanks and Zach Grenier.  Jeff Daniels, Hope Davis, James Gandolfini and Marcia Gay Harden tried to make nice (and failed) in Yasmina Reza’s comedy God of Carnage directed by Matthew Warchus.  Jeremy Irons and Joan Allen returned to Broadway after long absences to star in Michael Jacobs’ examination of art and love in Impressionism, directed by Tony Award-winner Jack O’Brien.

 

Fictitious monarchs Geoffrey Rush, Susan Sarandon, and Lauren Ambrose – and unappreciated servant Andrea Martin – added their regal presence to the Rialto in Eugene Ionesco’s Exit the King under the direction of Broadway newcomer Neil Armfield.  Historic British royalty was welcomed when Harriet Walter and Janet McTeer took to the stage in the Donmar Warehouse production of Mary Stuart, directed by Phyllida Lloyd.  And The Norman Conquests, Alan Ayckbourn’s trilogy, showcased a somewhat more middle class group of Brits, helmed by the busy Matthew Warchus.

 

Christopher Hampton’s The Philanthropist , directed by David Grindley and starring Matthew Broderick and Steven Weber, looked at the empty, insular lives of college intellectuals.  Appropriately closing the season is Samuel Beckett’s historic Waiting for Godot starring Nathan Lane, Bill Irwin, John Goodman and John Glover, and directed by Anthony Page.  It tells of two seemingly homeless men waiting for someone or something to explain life’s meaning – which, of course, never shows up.  Vladimir and Estragon might be relieved to know that as of yesterday, this year’s season has arrived at its end.

 

Please visit the link below for a 2.5 minute long glance back at the stars and shows this season  www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZ1ZH2TZNT8

 

 

#  #  #  # 

 

2008-2009 DRAMA LEAGUE AWARD NOMINATIONS

2008-2009 DRAMA LEAGUE AWARD NOMINATIONS

 

Nominations for the 75th annual Drama League Awards, celebrating excellence in Broadway and Off-Broadway theatre, were announced this morning.

 

 

33 VARIATIONS has been nominated for Distinguished Production of a Play (Moisés Kaufman) and Distinguished Performance Award (Jane Fonda).

 

 

ACCENT ON YOUTH has been nominated for a Distinguished Performance Award (David Hyde Pierce).

 

 

ALL MY SONS has been nominated for a Distinguished Performance Award (Patrick Wilson), as well as an honor for previous Distinguished Performance Award winner John Lithgow.

 

 

THE CRIPPLE OF INISHMAAN has been nominated Distinguished Revival of a Play (Garry Hynes) and Distinguished Performance Award (David Pearse).

 

 

DISTRACTED has been nominated for Distinguished Performance Award (Cynthia Nixon).

 

 

EXIT THE KING has been nominated for Distinguished Revival of a Play and two Distinguished Performance Awards  (Geoffrey Rush and Susan Sarandon).

 

 

GOD OF CARNAGE has been nominated for Distinguished Production of a Play and two nominations for the Distinguished Performance Award (Marcia Gay Harden and James Gandolfini).

 

 

MARY STUART has been nominated Distinguished Revival of a Play and two Distinguished Performance Awards (Janet McTeer, Harriet Walter).

 

 

THE NORMAN CONQUESTS has been nominated for Distinguished Revival of a Play and Distinguished Performance Award (Ben Miles).

 

 

PAL JOEY has been nominated for Distinguished Revival of a Musical and Distinguished Performance Award (Martha Plimpton).

 

 

RUINED has been nominated for Distinguished Production of a Play (Lynn Nottage) and Distinguished Performance Award (Saidah Arrika Ekulona).

 

 

THE SEAGULL has been nominated for Distinguished Revival of a Play and Distinguished Performance Award (Kristin Scott Thomas).  

 

 

SHREK THE MUSICAL has been nominated for Distinguished Production of a Musical and two Distinguished Performance  Awards (Sutton Foster , Christopher Sieber).

 

 

WAITING FOR GODOT has been nominated for two Distinguished Performance Awards  (John Glover , Bill Irwin).

 

 

Not for profit company nominations:

 

ATLANTIC THEATER COMPANY has been honored with two nominations for THE CRIPPLE OF INISHMAAN.

 

 

MANHATAN THEATRE CLUB productions have been honored with three nominations including two for RUINED and one for ACCENT ON YOUTH.

 

 

ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY productions have been honored with five nominations including two for WAITING FOR GODOT, two for PAL JOEY and onefor DISTRACTED. In addition past recipients of the Distinguished Performance Award will be honored on the dais for their work this season which includes: Stockard Channing (PAL JOEY), Frank Langella (A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS) and Mary-Louise Parker (HEDDA GABLER). 

 

 

 TO READ THE COMPLETE LIST OF NOMINEES, VISIT: http://tinyurl.com/c7f89a

2008-2009 OUTER CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD NOMINATIONS

2008-2009 OUTER CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD NOMINATIONS

 

Nominations for the 59th annual Outer Critics Circle Awards, celebrating excellence in Broadway and Off-Broadway theatre, were announced this morning.

 

 

 

33 VARIATIONS has been nominated for five Outer Critics Circle Awards including: Outstanding New Broadway Play (Moisés Kaufman), Outstanding Director of a Play (Moisés Kaufman), Outstanding Featured Actor in a Play (Zach Grenier), Outstanding Set Design (Derek McLane) and Outstanding Lighting Design (David Lander).

 

 

A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS has been nominated for one Outer Critic’s Circle Award including: Outstanding Featured Actor in a Play (Patrick Page).

 

 

BODY AWARENESS has received a John Gassner Award nomination for playwright Annie Baker.

 

 

THE CRIPPLE OF INISHMAAN has received three nominations, including Outstanding Revival of a Play (Broadway or Off-Broadway), Outstanding Director of a Play (Garry Hynes), and Outstanding Featured Actor in a Play (David Pearse).

 

 

EXIT THE KING by Eugene Ionesco has been nominated for two Outer Critics Circle Awards, including: Outstanding Actor in a Play (Geoffrey Rush), and Outstanding Featured Actress in a Play (Andrea Martin). The production is directed by Neil Armfield.

 

 

FARRAGUT NORTH has received two nominations: Outstanding New Off-Broadway Play and the John Gassner Award (Beau Willimon).

 

 

GOD OF CARNAGE by Yasmina Reza has been nominated for two Outer Critics Circle Awards, including: Outstanding New Play and Outstanding Actress in a play (Marcia Gay Harden). The production is directed by Matthew Warchus.

 

 

HUMOR ABUSE, which just concluded its extended run at MTC, has received a nomination for Outstanding Solo Performance (Lorenzo Pisoni).

 

 

MARY STUART has been nominated for three Outer Critics Circle Awards: Outstanding Actress in a Play (Janet McTeer, Harriet Walter) and Outstanding Featured Actor in a Play (John Benjamin Hickey).

 

 

THE NORMAN CONQUESTS has been nominated for two Outer Critics Circle Awards: Outstanding Revival of a Play and Outstanding Director of a Play (Matthew Warchus).  The production has won an award for Outstanding Ensemble Performance for the cast (Amelia Bullmore, Jessica Hynes, Stephen Mangan, Ben Miles, Paul Ritter, Amanda Root).

 

 

PAL JOEY has been nominated for two Outer Critics Circle Awards including: Outstanding Revival of a Musical and Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical (Martha Plimpton).

 

 

RUINED, currently at Manhattan Theatre Club, has received five Outer Critics Circle Award nominations: Outstanding Off-Broadway Play, Outstanding Lead Actress (Saidah Arrika Ekulona), Outstanding Featured Actor (Russell G. Jones), Outstanding Featured Actress (Condola Rashad), and Outstanding Lighting Design (Peter Kaczorowski).

 

 

SHREK THE MUSICAL has been nominated for 10 Outer Critics Circle Awards, including: Outstanding New Broadway Musical, Outstanding New Score (David Lindsay-Abaire & Jeanine Tesori), Outstanding Director of a Musical (Jason Moore), Outstanding Choreographer (Josh Prince), Outstanding Set Design (Tim Hatley), Outstanding Costume Design (Tim Hatley), Outstanding Actor in a Musical (Brian d’Arcy James), Outstanding Actress in a Musical (Sutton Foster), Outstanding Featured Actor in a Musical (Daniel Breaker), Outstanding Featured Actor in a Musical (Christopher Sieber).

 

 

WAITING FOR GODOT has been nominated for five Outer Critics Circle Awards including: Outstanding Revival of a Play, Outstanding Actor in a Play (Bill Irwin & Nathan Lane) Outstanding Director of a Play (Anthony Page) and Outstanding Set Design

(Santo Loquasto).

 

 

WHAT’S THAT SMELL? THE MUSIC OF JACOB STERLING has received two nominations, for Outstanding New Off-Broadway Musical and Outstanding Actor in a Musical (David Pittu).

 

 

ATLANTIC THEATER COMPANY productions have been honored with eight nominations: including three for THE CRIPPLE OF INISHMAAN, two for FARRUGUT NORTH, two for WHAT’S THAT SMELL? THE MUSIC OF JACOB STERLING and one for BODY AWARENESS

 

 

MANHATAN THEATRE CLUB productions have been honored with six Outer Critics Circle nominations: RUINED, received five nominations, the most nominations for an Off-Broadway show; and one nomination for HUMOR ABUSE

 

 

ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY productions have been honored with eight nominations including five for WAITING FOR GODOT, two for PAL JOEY, and one for A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS.

 

 

TO READ THE COMPLETE LIST OF NOMINEES, VISIT:  http://tinyurl.com/crfaja

A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS CONCLUDES LIMITED ENGAGEMENT 12/14/08

ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY

Final Week!

 

 

3-Time Tony Award® Winner

FRANK LANGELLA

 

In a new Broadway production of

A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS

By Robert Bolt

Directed by Doug Hughes

 

concludes its limited engagement Sunday, December 14th!

 

“Frank Langella is a living legend. His More is luminous.”

-Ben Brantley, The New York Times

 

“Gripping and absorbing. Frank Langella mesmerizes in a majestic and commanding performance. His physical decline — from a towering figure to an ashen, limping man — is shattering.”

-David Rooney, Variety

 

“Frank Langella gives an Indelible, irresistible performance.”

-Elysa Gardner, USA Today

 

On Broadway at the American Airlines Theatre

 

Roundabout Theatre Company‘s (Todd Haimes, Artistic Director) limited engagement of A Man for All Seasons will play its final performance on Sunday, December 14th at 2:00 PM. This revival of Robert Bolt’s classic A Man for All Seasons stars Frank Langella as “Sir Thomas More,” and is directed by Doug Hughes at the American Airlines Theatre (227 West 42nd St). 

 

A Man for All Seasons began previews on September 12th and opened officially on October 7th, 2008. When it closes it will have played 29 preview performances and 73 regular performances.

 

The cast includes Hannah Cabell (Margaret More), Michael Esper (William Roper), Michel Gill (Duke of Norfolk), Zach Grenier (Thomas Cromwell), Dakin Matthews (Cardinal Wolsey), George Morfogen (Thomas Cranmer, Archbishop), Patrick Page (King Henry VIII), Maryann Plunkett (Alice More), Jeremy Strong (Richard Rich), Charles Borland (Jailor), Peter Bradbury (Steward), Patricia Hodges (Woman), Triney Sandoval (Thomas Chapuys) and Emily Dorsch.

  

The design team includes Santo Loquasto (sets), Catherine Zuber (costumes), David Lander (lights),

David Van Tieghem (original music & sound) and Tom Watson (hair & wigs).

 

A Man for All Seasons is a timeless exploration of politics, religion and power. Robert Bolt’s classic drama is based on the fascinating true story of English Chancellor Sir Thomas More and his moral objection to King Henry VIII’s plan to leave the Catholic Church.

 

TICKET INFORMATION & PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE:

Tickets are available by calling Roundabout Ticket Services at (212)719-1300, online at www.roundabouttheatre.org or at the American Airlines theatre box office (227 West 42 Street). 

Ticket prices range from $66.50 to $111.50.

 

A Man for All Seasons will play Tuesday through Saturday evening at 8:00 p.m. with Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m. 

 

www.roundabouttheatre.org

### 

 

A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS EXTENDS

Roundabout Theatre Company

 

Announces

 

ONE WEEK EXTENSION!

Through December 14th, 2008

 

 3-Time Tony Award® Winner

FRANK LANGELLA

 

In a new Broadway production of

A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS

By Robert Bolt

Directed by Doug Hughes

 

“Frank Langella’s Sir Thomas More is a luminous entity.  Stage actors don’t reach the living legend status achieved by this charismatic star without giving good glow.  Mr. Langella haloes himself with such incandescence that you may wish you had brought along a pair of polarized glasses.  He is inarguably a Great Presence.”

– New York Times, Ben Brantley

 

On Broadway at the American Airlines Theatre

 

 

Roundabout Theatre Company (Todd Haimes, Artistic Director) is pleased to announce a one week extension of Robert Bolt’s A Man for All Seasons starring three time Tony Award® Winner Frank Langella as “Sir Thomas More.”  Directed by Tony Award® Winner Doug Hughes, the new Broadway production will extend through December 14th, 2008.

 

A Man for All Seasons officially opened to critical praise on Tuesday, October 7th, 2008 at the American Airlines Theatre on Broadway (227 West 42nd Street).

 

The cast includes Hannah Cabell (Margaret More), Michael Esper (William Roper), Michel Gill (Duke of Norfolk), Zach Grenier (Thomas Cromwell), Dakin Matthews (Cardinal Wolsey), George Morfogen (Thomas Cranmer, Archbishop), Patrick Page (King Henry VIII), Maryann Plunkett (Alice More), Jeremy Strong (Richard Rich), Charles Borland (Jailor), Peter Bradbury (Steward), Patricia Hodges (Woman), Triney Sandoval (Thomas Chapuys) and Emily Dorsch.

 

The design team includes Santo Loquasto (sets), Catherine Zuber (costumes), David Lander (lights), David Van Tieghem (original music & sound) and Tom Watson (hair & wigs).

 

A Man for All Seasons is a timeless exploration of politics, religion and power. Robert Bolt’s classic drama is based on the fascinating true story of English Chancellor Sir Thomas More and his moral objection to King Henry VIII’s plan to leave the Catholic Church.

 

 

Frank Langella returns to Broadway following his Tony winning role in Frost/Nixon in 2007. Langella returns to Roundabout Theatre Company following the 1997 Off-Broadway production of Cyrano de Bergerac in which he starred, directed and adapted the book. Other Roundabout productions include The Father (1996) and The Tempest (1989). Doug Hughes is a Resident Director at Roundabout Theatre Company where he recently directed Patrick Marber’s Howard Katz, Eugene O’Neill’s A Touch of the Poet, Richard Greenberg’s comedy A Naked Girl on the Appian Way, Jon Robin Baitz’s The Paris Letter and Stephen Belber’s McReele.  Hughes earned the 2005 Tony®, Drama Desk, Outer Critics Circle and Lucille Lortel Awards for Best Direction of John Patrick Shanley’s Doubt

 

A Man for All Seasons premiered on Broadway in 1961 and won the Tony Award for Best Play. In 1966, the play was made into a feature film and went on to win six Oscars.  This production marks the play’s first Broadway revival!

 

TICKET INFORMATION:

Tickets are available by calling Roundabout Ticket Services at (212)719-1300, online at www.roundabouttheatre.org or at the American Airlines theatre box office (227 West 42 Street). 

A Man for All Seasons will play a limited engagement. Ticket prices range from $66.50 to $111.50.

 

PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE:

A Man for All Seasons will play Tuesday through Saturday evening at 8:00 p.m. with Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m. 

 

BIOGRAPHIES:

Frank Langella (Sir Thomas More). Broadway: Frost Nixon (Morgan), Match (Belber),  Fortune’s Fool (Turgenev), The Father (Strindberg), Present Laughter (Coward), Amadeus (Schaffer), Hurlyburly (Rabe), Passion (Nichol), Seascape (Albee), Design for Living (Coward), Sherlock’s Last Case (Marowitz), Dracula (Hamilton-Dean), A Cry of Players (Gibson), Yerma (Lorca).  Off-Broadway: Cyrano (Rostand), After the Fall (Miller), The Old Glory: Benito Cereno (Lowell), The White Devil (Webster), The Prince of Homburg (Von Kliest), The Immoralist (Gide), The Tempest (Shakespeare), and A Christmas Carol (Menken/Ahrens). Films: Good Night, and Good Luck; Superman Returns; Starting Out in the Evening; Lolita; Dave; The Ninth Gate; Dracula; Those Lips, Those Eyes; I’m Losing You; Diary of a Mad Housewife; The Twelve Chairs.  Directors include George C. Scott, Arthur Penn, Roman Polanski, Adrian Lyne, Sir Peter Hall, Mike Nichols, Susan Stroman, Ivan Reitman, Ridley Scott, George Clooney, Bryan Singer, and Mel Brooks. Television: PBS’ “Eccentricities of a Nightingale” and Chekhov’s “The Seagull,” ABC’s “The Beast,” HBO’s “The Doomsday Gun”, Vonnegut’s “Monkey House” for Showtime and HBO’s “Unscripted” executive produced by George Clooney. Honors: Induction into the 2003 Theatre Hall of Fame, three Tonys, five Drama Desks, three Obies, three Outer Critics Circles, the Drama League, the National Society of Film Critics, the Cable Ace Award, Boston Film Critics Award, as well as Golden Globe, Emmy and Olivier nominations, and an Independent Spirit Award nomination. The film Frost/Nixon directed by Ron Howard will open December 5, 2008.

 

ROBERT BOLT (Playwright). Robert Oxton Bolt was born in Sale in Manchester on 15 August 1924, the son of a shopkeeper. Early education at Manchester Grammar School was followed by a history degree at Manchester University. After serving in the Royal Air Force in World War II, Bolt qualified as a teacher and taught English in the prestigious private school Millfield between 1950 and 1958. It was here that, in his spare time, he wrote both radio and stage plays. Many of his radio plays received an airing and he also did some producing. In 1958, encouraged by the London success of his play The Flowering Cherry, he gave up teaching to concentrate full time on his writing. In 1960 he had two plays running in London, The Tiger and the Horse and A Man for All Seasons. The eponymous role of Sir Thomas More shot actor Paul Scofield to stardom, and A Man for All Seasons proved a huge hit both in London’s West End and on Broadway where in 1962 it was voted Best Foreign Play of the Year. This success attracted the attention of Hollywood, and producer Sam Spiegel approached Bolt to revise Michael Wilson’s script for Lawrence of Arabia. Directed by David Lean, it was Bolt’s first successful screenplay and he received an Academy Award nomination for it. Bolt won his first Oscar for his next collaboration with Lean, Doctor Zhivago in 1963. In 1966 his screen adaptation of A Man for All Seasons won him a second Oscar. Meanwhile, on stage, Bolt produced Gentle Jack in 1963 and a play for children, The Thwarting of Baron Bolligrew at Christmas 1965. In 1970 another historical play, charting the relationship between Mary Queen of Scots and Elizabeth I, Vivat! Vivat! Regina! played to full houses at the Chichester Festival and later enjoyed a long run in the West End.  When it was transferred to Broadway two years later it was nominated for a Tony Award for Best Play. Meanwhile, Bolt wrote the screenplay for two films starring his then wife, Sarah Miles; Ryan’s Daughter in 1970 and the historical costume drama Lady Caroline Lamb in 1972. Sarah was both his second and fourth (last) wife; the first married in 1967, but divorced in 1976, then after a third marriage ended in divorce in 1985, Sarah and Bolt remarried in 1988. In 1972, Bolt was appointed a CBE. In 1976, David Lean approached Bolt with an idea to rework the story of the infamous Bounty mutiny and, for two years, he worked on this epic project, creating two versions. Before he could complete the second, however, Bolt suffered a massive heart attack in April 1979, followed by a stroke. His one completed script was made into the film The Bounty five years later in 1981, directed by Roger Donaldson. His final film script, for The Mission, was produced in 1986. Robert Bolt died on 12 February 1995 at the age of seventy.

 

DOUG HUGHES (Director) recently directed Theresa Rebeck’s Mauritius for MTC.  He also directed John Patrick Shanley’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Doubt (2005 Tony, Lucille Lortel, Outer Critics and Drama Desk Awards for Best Direction of a Play) and Shanley’s Defiance.  Hughes is the Resident Director at Roundabout Theatre Company, where he has directed Howard Katz, A Touch of the Poet, A Naked Girl on the Appian Way, The Paris

Letter and McReele.  Other work in New York includes Inherit The Wind at the Lyceum Theatre (Drama Desk Nomination, Best Director; Tony Award Nomination, Best Revival), The House in Town at Lincoln Center, Frozen (Tony Award, Outer Critics Circle and Lortel nominations) and The Grey Zone (1996 Obie Award, Direction) at MCC; Engaged at TFANA; Flesh and Blood (Callaway Award, Best Direction) at NYTW; Othello at the Public and Lake Hollywood at Signature. In May 2005, Hughes received an Obie Award for Sustained Excellence. 

 

Lead support provided by Roundabout’s Play Production Fund partners: Beth and Ravenel Curry, Steven and Liz Goldstone, The Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation, Mary and David Solomon..

 

Roundabout Theatre Company is one of the country’s leading not-for-profit theatres.  The company contributes invaluably to New York’s cultural life by staging the highest quality revivals of classic plays and musicals as well as new plays by established writers. Roundabout consistently partners great artists with great works to bring a fresh and exciting interpretation that makes each production relevant and important to today’s audiences.

 

Roundabout Theatre Company currently produces at three permanent homes each of which is designed specifically to enhance the needs of the Roundabout’s mission.  Off-Broadway, the Harold and Miriam Steinberg Center for Theatre, which houses the Laura Pels Theatre and Black Box Theatre, with its simple sophisticated design is perfectly suited to showcasing new plays. The grandeur of its Broadway home on 42nd Street, American Airlines Theatre, sets the ideal stage for the classics.  Roundabout’s Studio 54 provides an exciting and intimate Broadway venue for its musical and special event productions.  Together these three distinctive venues serve to enhance the work on each of its stages.

 

Roundabout productions are made possible, in part, with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, the National Endowment for the Arts; and the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation.  American Express is the 2008-2009 season sponsor of the Roundabout Theatre Company.  American Airlines is the official airline of Roundabout Theatre Company.  The Westin New York is the official hotel of Roundabout Theatre Company.   

 

Roundabout Theatre Company‘s 2008-2009 season also includes Robert Bolt’s A Man for All Seasons, starring Frank Langella, directed by Doug Hughes; Rodgers & Hart’s Pal Joey, starring Stockard Channing, Christian Hoff & Martha Plimpton, directed by Joe Mantello; David Rabe’s Streamers, directed by Scott Ellis; Steven Levenson’s The Language of Trees, directed by Alex Timbers; Henrik Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler, starring Mary-Louise Parker, directed by Ian Rickson; Lisa Loomer’s Distracted featuring Cynthia Nixon, directed by Mark Brokaw and Christopher Hampton’s The Philanthropist, starring Matthew Broderick, directed by David Grindley.  Roundabout’s sold out production of The 39 Steps transferred to the Cort Theatre on April 29th, 2008.

 

Roundabout Theatre Company‘s critically acclaimed Broadway production of Reginald Rose’s Twelve Angry Men is currently booking the third year of its multi-award winning tour.  Twelve Angry Men is directed by Tony-nominated director Scott Ellis (Curtains).

 

www.roundabouttheatre.org

A MAN FOR ALL SEASON’S PATRICK PAGE IN THE NEW YORK TIMES

Roundabout Theatre Company’s A Man for All Seasons, starring Frank Langella opens tomorrow on Broadway at the American Airlines Theatre.

 

The New York Times 

Arts & Leisure 

October 5, 2008

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/05/theater/05mill.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=patrick%20page&st=cse&oref=slogin

 

The Grinch Meets Sir Thomas More

By STUART MILLER

 

LAST year, the director Doug Hughes took his nephew to see “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! The Musical” on Broadway. Mr. Hughes was simply looking for some holiday fun, but he rediscovered, beneath the Grinch’s furry green costume, a fondly remembered Shakespearean actor.

 

Since coming to New York in 1993, Patrick Page has been known mostly for cartoonish roles, including more than three years as Lumiere in “Beauty and the Beast” and three more as Scar in “The Lion King.” But in regional theater he is known as a Shakespearean leading man.

 

“I had met him years ago at Seattle Rep,” Mr. Hughes said, “and seeing him as the Grinch helped me connect the dots and realize that this was that fantastic actor who had played Hamlet, Claudius, Iago, Brutus, Antony and the Scottish king.”

 

So when time came to cast his revival of Robert Bolt’s play “A Man for All Seasons,” Mr. Hughes said, he knew exactly who he wanted to play Henry VIII opposite Frank Langella’s Sir Thomas More. “It is just one big scene, but it is crucial to the play, so I asked Patrick,” he said. “Whether it’s the Grinch or Iago or Henry, he has the imagination and skill to portray a character of this size that becomes a living, breathing, walking metaphor, and he could absolutely match up with Langella.”

 

Mr. Langella, by contrast, had never seen Mr. Page’s work. But, he wrote in an e-mail message: “The role of Henry was his four lines into his audition. Unmistakable gifts. The single most intelligent, beautifully prepared and excitingly acted audition I have ever seen an actor give.”

 

Mr. Page, 46, agrees that there is a through line from Macbeth and Iago to Scar and the Grinch to Henry: “a long line of egotists.” Whether it’s committing murder to ascend to the throne (in Shakespeare or Disney), or stopping Christmas and all that noise, noise, noise, or ditching one wife for another no matter the consequences, “these characters all have very strong desires and a ruthlessness about achieving them,” he said. “That, of course, is very fun to play.”

 

To read the full article click here:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/05/theater/05mill.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=patrick%20page&st=cse&oref=slogin  

 

 

 

A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS BEGINS PREVIEWS TOMORROW

Previews begin tomorrow Friday, September 12th at 8pm! 

 

ROUNDABOUT THEATRE COMPANY

presents

 

FRANK LANGELLA

 

In a new Broadway production of

A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS

By Robert Bolt

 

with

Hannah Cabell, Michael Esper, Michel Gill, Zach Grenier, Dakin Matthews,

George Morfogen, Patrick Page, Maryann Plunkett, Jeremy Strong

Charles Borland, Peter Bradbury, Patricia Hodges, Triney Sandoval, Emily Dorsch

 

Directed by Doug Hughes

 

Opening night is October 7th, 2008

at the American Airlines Theatre on Broadway

 

 

Roundabout Theatre Company’s (Todd Haimes, Artistic Director) new Broadway production of A Man for All Seasons, starring Frank Langella as “Sir Thomas More”, begins previews tomorrow Friday, September 12th at 8:00PM.  A Man for All Seasons, by Robert Bolt and directed by Doug Hughes is playing at the American Airlines Theatre (227 West 42nd Street). 

 

The cast includes Hannah Cabell (Margaret More), Michael Esper (William Roper), Michel Gill (Duke of Norfolk), Zach Grenier (Thomas Cromwell), Dakin Matthews (Cardinal Wolsey), George Morfogen (Thomas Cranmer, Archbishop), Patrick Page (King Henry VIII), Maryann Plunkett (Alice More), Jeremy Strong (Richard Rich), Charles Borland (Jailor), Peter Bradbury (Steward), Patricia Hodges (Woman), Triney Sandoval (Thomas Chapuys) and Emily Dorsch.

 

A Man for All Seasons will open officially on Tuesday, October 7th, 2008.   This is a limited engagement through December 7th, 2008.

 

The design team will include Santo Loquasto (sets), Catherine Zuber (costumes), David Lander (lights), David Van Tieghem (original music & sound) and Tom Watson (hair & wigs).

 

A Man for All Seasons is a timeless exploration of politics, religion and power. Robert Bolt’s classic drama is based on the fascinating true story of English Chancellor Sir Thomas More and his moral objection to King Henry VIII’s plan to leave the Catholic Church.

 

TICKET INFORMATION:

Tickets are available by calling Roundabout Ticket Services at (212)719-1300, online at www.roundabouttheatre.org or at the American Airlines Box Office (227 West 42nd Street). Ticket prices range from $66.50 to $111.50.

 

Through ACCESS Roundabout, 100 tickets are available for the first preview performance (September 12th) for only $10 each. 

 

PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE:

A Man for All Seasons plays Tuesday through Saturday evenings at 8:00PM with a Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday matinee at 2:00PM. 

 

www.roundabouttheatre.org

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