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Critics Cheer for Cherry, Sally & Mrs. Warren’s Profession

CRITICS ARE CHEERING FOR

CHERRY JONES, SALLY HAWKINS AND MRS. WARREN!

MRS. WARREN’S PROFESSION

At

Roundabout Theatre Company

Read the reviews!

Roundabout Theatre Company (Todd Haimes, Artistic Director) presents a new Broadway production of George Bernard Shaw’s play Mrs. Warren’s Profession, starring Tony® Award winner Cherry Jones as “Kitty Warren” & Golden Globe winner Sally Hawkins making her Broadway debut as “Vivie Warren”, directed by Tony® Award winner Doug HughesMrs. Warren’s Profession is playing at the American Airlines Theatre (227 West 42nd St).  This is a limited engagement through November 28th, 2010.

NEW YORK TIMES by Ben Brantley

“The delightful surprise of Mrs. Warren’s Profession, which opened on Sunday night at the American Airlines Theater, is that Cherry Jones, in the title role, does not nearly glow. She glitters.  Allow me to elaborate on degrees of light from within in acting — and Ms. Jones’s dazzling command of them. By glowing I mean that incandescence associated particularly with actresses who seem haloed by emotional purity and intensity. They are women who were born to play Joan of Arc.  For decades Julie Harris was a byword for glowing in the American theater; more recently Ms. Jones has assumed that mantle, generating good glow in ravishing performances that include her Tony-winning turns as the love-starved dutiful spinster-daughter of The Heiress and the nun with a detective’s instincts in Doubt.  The glowing part in “Mrs. Warren’s Profession” is that of the title character’s daughter, Vivie (a role assayed here by the talented Sally Hawkins).  Ms. Jones, in her first Broadway appearance in four years, is as illuminating as ever, confirming her reputation as an actress of not only formidable charisma but also meticulous craft.”

TIME OUT NY MAGAZINE by David Cote

“Roundabout Theatre Company’s handsome and absorbing revival of Mrs. Warren’s Profession is about a self-possessed young lady who learns that her education was paid for thorough the sexual slavery of girls peddled by her mother.  Hawkins is a mostly refreshing Vivie—she’s coltish and keen but still a touch awkward.  Cherry Jones makes a full meal of a role for which she is perfectly suited. Jones is deliciously sensual and arch in a series of gaudy outfits, and her second-act speeches about pulling herself out of poverty are utterly spellbinding. Debonair Mark Harelik does sturdy work as Warren’s bullish business partner, Crofts, and Adam Driver is amusingly oleaginous as Vivie’s charming but morally flaccid lover, Frank. With grand sets and Doug Hughes’s smart, careful staging, so much goes right here.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS by Mark Kennedy

“A new revival by the Roundabout Theatre Company, comes as a happy surprise. Helmed by Doug Hughes and starring Cherry Jones and Sally Hawkins, the work is made urgent and subversive.  There are fireworks inside the American Airlines Theatre: Jones and Broadway newcomer Hawkins (Mike Leigh’s ‘Happy-Go-Lucky’) are first-rate as they circle each other in scene after scene, parrying and thrusting.”

BERGEN RECORD by Robert Feldberg

“People may come out of Mrs. Warren’s Profession talking about Sally Hawkins.

The petite British actress, has a small, wiry frame, but she gives Vivie an aura of steeliness, along with a very capable intelligence.  She is Shaw’s New Woman, rejecting domesticity in order to take her place at England’s capitalist table.  Vivie is the central character, and Hawkins makes her provocative in all her beliefs and conflicts.

Jones nestles us in the palm of her hand when she commandingly delivers the famous speech in which Kitty defends her choices as the best a poor, marginally educated, good-looking girl could make.”

NEWSDAY by Linda Winer

“Doug Hughes is a very good director. The competent cast includes several New York stage pros (Edward Hibbert, Mark Harelik, Michael Siberry), plus the Broadway debuts of enjoyable English actress Sally Hawkins (a favorite of Mike Leigh movies) and an intriguing, risk-taking newcomer named Adam Driver.  Then there is Cherry Jones, back onstage.  Jones could not give a bad performance if paid to do so.”

VARIETY by Marilyn Stasio

“In reviving Mrs. Warren’s Profession, the Roundabout performs a double service. The first favor is in bringing this bracing play of ideas back to Broadway for the first time in almost 35 years. Making the gift even more attractive, the production stars Cherry Jones as the imperishable Mrs. Kitty Warren, a character whose flashing intelligence and flamboyant manner make her a perfect match-up for this remarkable actress. Jones couldn’t be more delicious.  The stages of Jones’ perf are so subtly orchestrated that it’s impossible to spot those critical moments when she realizes that things aren’t going the way she planned. Almost imperceptibly, she softens the rough edges of Mrs. Warren’s earthy vulgarity, allowing her togather her thoughts and deliver a heartfelt explanation to her daughter, defending her unorthodox profession without apologizing for it. The moment is electric, bristling with sharply remembered pain and immediate maternal anxiety.”

HOLLYWOOD REPORTER by Frank Scheck

“In her first stage appearance since her Emmy-winning presidential turn in ‘24,’ Jones well captures the complex nature of her character. The actress certainly nails her showcase scene. Hawkins delivers a strong portrayal that resembles her very different, award-winning turn as the perpetually cheery optimist in Mike Leigh’s film “Happy-Go-Lucky” only in its fierce intensity.  It certainly looks handsome enough, with excellent contributions from Scott Pask’s sets, including a perfectly lovely cottage garden, and Catherine Zuber’s handsome period costumes (Mrs. Warren has never looked better). And the play, whose characters also include a hypocritical reverend with a secret sexual past, has more relevance than one might expect.”

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